New Trailer + Poster Spotlight: Wes Anderson’s The French Dispatch

Something super fun just arrived in my inbox today! I was in the middle of a rather long, tedious training for my new job, but upon opening this email, a huge smile formed on my face!

Ooooh!! I absolutely adore this poster, I wish I could have it to hang on my wall right now! Wes Anderson‘s upcoming movie has The Adventures of Tintin vibe to it, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé that I grew up reading religiously as a kid.

Here’s the premise…

THE FRENCH DISPATCH brings to life a collection of stories from the final issue of an American magazine published in a fictional 20th-century French city. It stars Benicio del Toro, Adrien Brody, Tilda Swinton, Léa Seydoux, Frances McDormand, Timothée Chalamet, Lyna Khoudri, Jeffrey Wright, Mathieu Amalric, Stephen Park, Bill Murray and Owen Wilson.

What a cast!! I know lots of [thirsty] people are going nuts over ‘it boy’ Timothée Chalamet writing naked in a bath tub 🤣 – I didn’t even notice him until an article specifically mentioned about it in the headline! In any case, I wonder if he’ll actually be speaking French in the movie? The internet would probably spontaneously combust!

Upon further reading, the Tintin vibe seems intentional given Tintin is a globe-trotting reporter. Per Wiki, the film has been described as “a love letter to journalists set at an outpost of an American newspaper in a fictional 20th-century French city”, centering on three storylines.

When speaking to French publication Charente Libre last year, Anderson noted: “The story is not easy to explain, [It’s about an] American journalist based in France [who] creates his magazine. It is more a portrait of this man, of this journalist who fights to write what he wants to write. It’s not a movie about freedom of the press, but when you talk about reporters you also talk about what’s going on in the real world.”

Per tradition of Wes Anderson’s movies, it’s another awesome ensemble cast, many of whom have worked with the Texas-born filmmaker. The screenplay was written by Anderson, Roman Coppola, Hugo Guinness, and Jason Schwartzman.

Now here’s the trailer! 

It’s classic Wes w/ his usual visual flair, distinct camera work and quirks! I love it!! It looks so much like Grand Budapest Hotel and I saw some of the cast are back as well. I can’t wait to step into this world of global journalism filled w/ intrigue and idiosyncrasies.

It’s scheduled to be released on July 24.


What do you think of The French Dispatch?

FlixChatter Review: SICARIO: DAY OF THE SOLDADO (2018)

Denis Villeneuve’s SICARIO was one of the best films of 2015 and one of my favorites that year. It was well received by many movie critics, but it wasn’t a huge box office hit, so I didn’t expect or wanted to see a sequel. But these days Hollywood studios will try to turn ANY movie into a franchise and now part 2 of the hit man saga has been unleash to multiplexes.

The story kicks off with terrorist bombings, including one at a major convenient store in the heartland of America. Special agent Matt Gravers (Josh Brolin) has been summon by his boss Cynthia Foards (Catherine Keener) to find out who’s responsible for the bombings. With the blessing from the Secretary of Defense James Riley (Matthew Modine), Gravers was given a mission to do whatever it takes to get a payback for the bombings.

After interrogating a Somalian pirate, he found out that the drug cartels in Mexico are smuggling terrorists through southern border of Texas. With a help of his trusted assassin Alejandro (Benicio Del Toro), they devised a plan to kidnap a daughter of one of the big drug cartels and made it look like it’s another cartel who did it. Their goal is to start a war between the cartels, hoping they would all kill each other and wouldn’t be able to smuggle people to the United States. The victim is teenager named Isabel Reyes (Isabela Moner), whose father happens to be the biggest drug lord in Mexico. Once Graves and his men took Isabel, things went south fast and Alejandro must use skills to protect Isabel from danger.

With Villeneuve being busy with other projects, stepping into the director’s chair this time is Stefano Sollima, whose previous projects were mostly TV shows in Italy. I thought he did a decent job by following Villeneuve’s template, in fact I think most people would think this film was directed by Villeneuve if they didn’t know a new director was hired for the job. The look and feel were no different from the last film. There’s nothing wrong with following the previous director’s style but for me, if a new director takes over a franchise, I expect to see that person to bring in their own creative vision. Sollima did stage a pretty impressive action sequence in a desert where Graves and his men got ambushed.

Taylor Sheridan’s script is solid but not as good as the first one. Here he tackled several political subjects that are relevant to our real-world issues such as immigration debate, terrorism and politics bickering. But I thought with all those complex ideas he came up with, they just masked a very thin plot. If you’ve seen the trailers of this film, you pretty much know the whole story and that’s pretty disappointing to me. There were opportunities to make this one even compelling than the first film, but the story ended way too fast. I understand they’re planning a trilogy, so hopefully the third film will give us better story.

Performances were pretty decent all around, Brolin and Del Toro looked very comfortable in their respective roles and some of the young actors were pretty good. I thought Keener’s and Modine’s character were kind of wasted, they didn’t really have much to do and could’ve been played by unknown actors.

I was looking forward to this sequel and was a disappointed, mostly with the script. I think they missed an opportunity to make this one as good or better than the last film. Still a solid thriller and fans of the first film should check it out.

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So have you seen Sicario: Day of the Soldado? Well, what did you think?

FlixChatter Review: SICARIO (2015)

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Director Denis Villeneuve loves to make films about dark subjects, in his latest one he decides to tackle the dark world of war on drugs here in United States.

After a raid that’s gone terribly wrong on a home that belongs to a very powerful drug cartel, young FBI agent Kate Macer (Emily Blunt) decides to volunteer to be part of a secret mission that’s being lead by a mysterious agent named Matt Graver (Josh Brolin). She’s on a need-to-know basis on this mission, she also meets another mysterious agent named Alejandro (Benicio Del Toro); who tells her that they’re going to find the biggest drug dealer in the world and take him down. Their first task was to transfer a prisoner from Mexico back to the States but some thugs decided to attempt the break the prisoner free.

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This lead to a shootout that killed all of the thugs in the middle of the highway and Macer was not too happy about it. She’s a by the book type of an agent and thought what happened during the shootout was illegal. But both Graver and Alejandro told her this is how it’s done in the real world and she has to deal with it. As the movie progresses, Macer starts to wonder if she’s in over her head and not sure if she could trust either of the men she thought had her back.

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I can’t say that I’m a fan of Emily Blunt since I haven’t seen many of her work. But she’s very good here as the ambitious young agent who thinks she can make a difference. Basically she represents us the audience, she’s seeing this ugly world of drug war for the first time, there are no rules and innocent people gets kill in the middle of it. Brolin is his usual self; he’s a mysterious character that you don’t really know which side he’s on. Del Toro on the other hand, really shines in this movie. His character is a cross between James Bond and Anton Chigurh from No Country For Old Men. He’s a cold blooded killer that can’t stop, but there’s a reason behind his madness.

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Director Denis Villeneuve did a great job of setting up the tension of every intense scenes but chose not to show the graphic violence you’d expect in this kind of film. The script by Taylor Sheridan is very well-written and full of twists and turns. For example, there’s a potential love story that I thought would derail the movie but then it turned ugly real fast. You think you figured something out, but he threw a curve ball at you.

Last but certainly not least is Roger Deakins‘ excellent cinematography, just like his other famous work, the shots in this film were all jaw dropping. There were a lot of wide shots of landscape and city that you have to see on the big screen to appreciate his beautiful work; maybe the Oscar voters will finally give him the golden statue this year.

With great performances, tight direction, well-written script and superlative cinematography, this is one of the year’s best films and I can’t wait to see it again. It’s very highly recommended.

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So have you seen SICARIO? Well, what did you think?

007 December Blogathon – 10 Reasons Why Licence to Kill (1989) is one of my all time favorite Bond films

007-december-blogathonMost of you who read this blog regularly knows I’m a huge Bond fan as I grew up watching them with my two brothers. Over the years I’ve become more partial to Timothy Dalton’s portrayal as Bond and I always appreciate both of his Bond films. I only wish he had the chance to do a third (which was he was under contract for until MGM legal battles delay production for six years!)

I’ve recently rewatched Licence To Kill again for MovieRob’s Bond December Blogathon, and still thoroughly enjoyed it. I’ve done a special appreciation for Dalton in the film, but this post will highlight TEN reasons why the film itself is one of my favorite Bond films of all time.

ltk_movieposter10. The hard-edged but also hugely personal storyline, interwoven with the Japanese Ronin tales with Bond as a rogue agent avenging the death of his friends. People complain that Bond might’ve been too dark but perhaps Licence to Kill was way ahead of its time as with Skyfall, people didn’t seem to mind the personal angle of the story. It’s a grounded, more realistic tale that doesn’t pit Bond as ‘savior of the world’ that’s become cliched and derivative.

9. Memorable opening scene that thrillingly and effectively sets up to the origin of Bond’s personal vendetta and the kind of ruthless gangster he has to contend with. It later featured a high-flying action as Bond and his CIA ally Felix Leiter captures drug lord Frank Sanchez by hooking his plane like a fish, literally!

8. Michael Kamen’s score – I’m a huge fan of John Barry’s work with the Bond franchise but as he was unavailable at the time. Given that the film’s released in the late 80s and Kamen’s scored other successful action franchises like Lethal Weapon and Die Hard, he seems to be the perfect composer for the job. There’s even a bit of John Barry’s elegant sound to it, but mixed with a darker tone and heart-pounding up-tempo style for the action scenes.



7. Memorable Bond girls who are more than mere eye candy
– with interesting but believable names, not preposterous ones like Dr. Christmas Jones or Pussy Galore. I especially love Carey Lowell as Pam Bouvier, a beautiful and strong former CIA pilot who’s saved Bond’s ass many times over. Talisa Soto is perfect as Sanchez’s sultry mistress and though she may seem Bimbo-like at times, her character actually has a purpose in Bond’s quest to get close to Sanchez.

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6. Great character reinvention – as this is longtime Bond director John Glen’s final Bond outing and the fact that Dalton’s keen on returning to Ian Flemming’s work, Licence to Kill feels like Bond of a new era, a complete break of the Moore’s mischievous style in every way. There is nothing whimsical about Licence to Kill, though I wouldn’t say it’s devoid of humor. Q’s intro to the film is actually quite hilarious, but it’s not just humor for the sake of it.

5. Gritty set pieces and spectacular action. Dalton did most of his own stunts, even when he was high up in the air in the ‘plane hooking’ scene, and the climactic truck chase is still as bad ass and riveting by today’s standards. If you look at the featurette, the scene isn’t crafted by CGI, but they used real tanker trucks and feature incredible stunts in the dangerous and supposedly haunted twisty highway of Rumorosa, Mexico. Sure there aren’t many of Q’s gadgets in this movie, but who with thrilling stunts like these, who needs ‘em?

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4. A formidable villain in Robert Davi. Frank Sanchez breaks the mold of the typical sociopath hellbent on ruling the world. There’s no over-the-top plan to recreate the human race and all that, Sanchez is simply a power-hungry and greedy mafia-type who strives to be a cocaine billionaire. Davi is one of my fave Bond villains because he’s menacing, brutal and cold-blooded killer but he’s also suave and sophisticated, one of those rare villains that’s as charismatic as Bond himself. Oh and who could forget one of his loco henchmen Dario in the form of young Benicio Del Toro.

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3. Suspenseful interaction between Bond & Sanchez – In many Bond films, when Bond meets his villain, usually they know he’s the enemy [which then calls for one of his henchmen to go after him]. But in this case, Bond enters Sanchez’ world as an ally, a trusted friend. I love their first meeting when Bond offers himself to Sanchez as someone who’d be good for someone of his stature… he’s not just a problem solver, but ‘more of a problem eliminator.’ As Bond sneaks out to infiltrate his organization and slowly tear it apart, there’s always tension that Sanchez will suspect something and he’d get caught at any moment.

2. Great climactic scene – not only is the CGI-free action stunts are incredible, but it’s such a pivotal moment between two men that’s been built up from the start. Thanks to strong character development between Bond and Sanchez, this climactic battle feels deeply personal to both of them. In a strange way, you also feel for Sanchez in that up until Bond showed the silver cigarette lighter from Leiter, he had no clue why Bond betrayed him. It’s a fiery finale, in every sense of the word, but it’s also a satisfying one and definitely one of the most memorable villain deaths.

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1. Timothy Dalton – Bond with substance, bad-ass but refined, gritty without being thuggish and he can be menacing and vulnerable in a matter of seconds. Case in point, when Bond confronts Pam Bouvier in the hotel room, he was angry enough to pull the trigger on her, but when she reveals the truth that ‘there’s more to it than his personal vendetta,’ Dalton’s expression immediately immediately softens and the remorse is palpable on his face as he hands her gun back to her.

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Nice to see the glamorous playboy actually fights out of love and loyalty and the story utilizes Dalton’s Shakespearean training perfectly. He’s not a super spy that people can’t relate to, but he’s plays Bond as a human being with real angst and real feelings, but as it’s said in the poster, he’s got a real dangerous side to him that is both intimidating and sexy. He’s believably ruthless, too, as when he threatened a beautiful woman “Make a sound, and you’re dead!” we believe that he actually could pull the trigger. The tall and lean Dalton is both a physical and cerebral Bond and he has that understated swagger that effective but isn’t showy.

So there, I’ve made my case for both Licence to Kill and Dalton as Bond. It’s a pity this film is known as the lowest-grossing Bond film but I think it’s so criminally underrated and I urge people who haven’t seen this to give it a shot. I’d say people who like Daniel Craig’s Bonds will appreciate the tough-edged story and exhilarating action. Not to mention a fantastic performance from both actors playing Bond and his nemesis. What else could you ask for?


So have you seen Licence to Kill? Let me know what YOU think!

Five for the Fifth: SEPTEMBER 2014 Edition

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Welcome to FlixChatter’s primary blog series! As is customary for this monthly feature, I get to post five random news item/observation/poster, etc. and then turn it over to you to share your take on that given topic. You can see the previous five-for-the-fifth posts here.

1. As customary with Five for the Fifth, I’d like to highlight a filmmaker/actor who’s having a birthday today. Well, it so happens that Paddy Considine turns 41 today.

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The underrated British actor is perhaps most well-known to mainstream audiences from his brief role in Bourne Ultimatum, remember the Waterloo station scene? I actually first saw Paddy in the excellent 2002 drama In America, as well as in two of the Edgar Wright’s Cornetto trilogy: Hot Fuzz and The World’s End. Aside from being a terrific actor, Considine is also an acclaimed filmmaker. He won a BAFTA for his directing work in Tyrannosaur starring Peter Mullan.

So what’s your favorite film from this talented English actor?
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2. I haven’t posted a trailer in a while and this one caught my attention from the past week, Escobar: Paradise Lost.

In Colombia, a young surfer meets the woman of his dreams – and then he meets her uncle, Pablo Escobar.

I thought that the casting of Josh Hutcherson as the young surfer is interesting as I’ve only seen him in The Hunger Games so far. Benicio del Toro seems suited to play the mighty powerful Colombian drug kingpin, and he looks quite menacing in the trailer.

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I’ve been meaning to check out this documentary called The Two Escobars that focuses on the lives of two unrelated men who shares the same last name but somehow their lives were inextricably – and fatally – intertwined. Now I’m not sure how historically-accurate Paradise Lost is, other than using Pablo’s character in the story.

Thoughts on this one? Does the trailer pique your interest?

3. Most of you are probably familiar with Dan Stevens from his Downton Abbey role as Matthew Crawley. Well, if you google him now, he looks quite different from his Downton days. He apparently lost a lot of weight and had been training extensively to look leaner and athletic. I wasn’t watching the show yet when he reportedly left the show to pursue a Hollywood career, and so far it seems, it’s paid off.

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Stevens in Downton Abbey
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Stevens in The Guest
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Stevens in Walk Among the Tombstones

The English actor seems adamant to shed his period drama image as his upcoming roles are pretty bad ass. He’s playing the lead in The Guest as a soldier who introduces himself to the Peterson family, claiming to be a friend of their son who died in action. It’s an R-rated thriller that looks quite sinister. Another film he’s starring that’s also out this month looks to be quite a violent one. This time he’s playing supporting role to Liam Neeson’s A Walk Among the Tombstones, as a Brooklyn drug trafficker  whose wife was murdered.

The actor’s uprooted his family to NYC as well, perhaps to make things easier for his career as Hollywood beckons. Quoted in Daily Mail, he admitted that it was the hardest decision he had to make leaving Downton, but he said ‘I’ve got an appetite to learn new things. It’s nothing more than that.’

So my question to you is, which actor/actress (be it TV or film) would you like to see reinvent themselves in a similar fashion?

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4. Ok, now some casting news that’s been circulating the blogosphere this past week. Well, this happens to be a remake of Escape from New York that’s been in development hell for some time, heh perhaps that’s a sign they should’ve left it well enough alone? Reportedly Charlie Hunnam has just been cast as Snake Plissken, a role that Kurt Russell was perhaps best known for.

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Apparently Dan Stevens was up for the role as well, interestingly enough. I think Hunnam is better-suited as Plissken though, he’s got more of that devil-may-care grit and bad-assery about him that comes more naturally to him than Stevens. I remember a few years back there were reports that Russell was miffed that the studio was considering Gerry Butler, a Scot, to play an iconic all-American role. Ahah well, this time they gave it to an English actor anyway. Seems that Hunnam’s one busy actor, he’s also working on yet another King Arthur adaptation (directed by Guy Ritchie) with him in the title role.

In any case, here’s the rumored plot for the Escape of New York remake per Firstshowing: Rather than just focusing on Snake Plissken venturing through the prison that is New York, this time the story sees Plissken teaming with “a rogues gallery of criminals who look to leave the island-turned-prison in exchange for the rescue of the captured U.S. President.”

What do you think of this casting news and this remake project in particular?

5. This month Five for the Fifth’s guest is my pal Tim from Tim Film Reviews Blog.

TimFilmReviewsSo here it is in his own words:

It’s a question I’ve been pondering since the recent release schedule. Most people associate comic-book movies with big budget tentpole Summer movies, but there are actually quite a few small to medium budget movies made well under $100M. Dredd, Kick-Ass, Scott Pilgrim, Blade, Hellboy, etc. just to name a few.

Well, do you think superhero/comic book films should get a big-budget treatment?


Well, that’s it for the September 2014 edition of Five for the Fifth, folks. Now, please pick a question out of the five above or better yet, do ‘em all! 😀

The [Untouchables] prequel I actually would LOVE to see: Capone Rising

Now, there are few prequels made that actually worked. In fact, I could only think of two that I actually like: Rise of the Planet of the Apes and X-Men: First Class. And The Hobbit is poised to join the scarce number of prequels people anticipated most, but generally speaking, few prequels—or sequels, for that matter—are really that necessary. But I’d like to argue that the prequel to The Untouchables is one I wish would get made real soon!

This Collider interview with Brian De Palma is one that sparked me to write this post, though I have mentioned it three years ago here when the film was supposedly in negotiation and they were still casting who would play Capone. Now before I get to that, here’s an excerpt from that interview:

Collider: The Untouchables was a huge favorite of mine growing up and I was always excited the few times your prequel Capone Rising would move forward before fizzling out. Is there any chance of that happening at this point?

De Palma: I don’t know. We’ve had it cast many times, but we’ve just never been able to get everything together at the same time. It’s owned by Paramount so there’s nothing I can do.

Who did you plan to cast in that?

De Palma: At one point I think I had Nicolas Cage playing Capone. Gerard Butler was going to do the Sean Connery part. I think we even had Benicio Del Toro as Capone at one point. We had so many great people attached. It’s one of those legendarily great scripts that actors would die to play, but we’ve just never been able to get it all together with Paramount.

Ok, you probably think that I’m excited for this because of Gerry Butler‘s involvement, and you’d be half right. I’d LOVE to see him with directors like De Palma, but I also LOVE the original film that garnered Sean Connery his only Oscar for Best Actor in a Supporting Role. I think Butler would’ve been perfect as a young Irish-American officer Jimmy Malone. Reportedly the script would explore how Malone wasn’t always the good, incorruptible cop. Now, I found the synopsis from Mafia Wiki (boy there’s apparently a wiki for everything!) on Capone Rising:

It tells the story of Al Capone, his arrival in Chicago and his dealings with cop Jimmy Malone and Capone’s subsequent rise to power. Beginning with Capone’s killing of Edwin Macy in New York, Capone moves to Chicago. Jimmy Malone, recently promoted to detective, befriends Capone. He is not bribed by money, but respects him by arresting his henchmen but not Capone as his 9 year old son is present. Capone returns the favor by letting a witness to a murder, a maid named Halina, live. He changes his mind and has her killed on a train. In revenge, Malone soon begins to rally Irish gangsters, culminating in the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre.

Eight months ago, I read reports earlier this year that Tom Hardy was cast to play the iconic gangster Capone for David Yates’ Cicero, and I think Hardy could pull it off better than Nic Cage! According to Screenrant, the project isn’t supposed to start until 2013, so it’d be a dream to see Hardy and Butler in a movie together again since Rocknrolla.

I always love seeing villains who started out as friends first, or at least they saw eye-to-eye before they went separate ways. It’ll be a much different relationship obviously, I don’t think we’ll be seeing these two slow-dancing like this again, ahah.

Interestingly enough, the Mafia Wiki reported that Antoine Fuqua was initially going to direct Capone Rising, instead of De Palma. And now Fuqua is directing Butler in the White House thriller Olympus Has Fallen. I sincerely hope Butler would sign on again as he originally did in 2007 if this movie would ever get off the ground!!


Well, what do you think of this prequel folks? Anybody else want to see this movie get made soon?

The Wolfman’s Awesomely-eerie Posters & Trailer

The Wolfman recently released a series of awesome-looking posters. I’ve got to admit I wasn’t too interested in this flick until I caught the trailer as my hubby was watching. It boast an all-star cast including Benicio del Toro as the cursed monster and Emily Blunt as the woman he loves, Gwen Conliffe. Surely you can’t judge a movie by the cast alone, but with Sir Anthony Hopkins AND Hugo Weaving involvement, it can’t be all bad.

The Wolfman centers on an American man, Lawrence Talbot, who upon his return to his ancestral home in Great Britain is bitten, and subsequently cursed by, a werewolf. The haunted nobleman, is lured back to his family estate after his brother vanishes. Reunited with his estranged father, Talbot sets out to find his brother… and discovers a horrifying destiny for himself. From the trailer (take a peek below the posters), this looks terrifying but also tragic and heartbreaking, which is a good thing as I couldn’t care less watching a heartless monster running around like say, that madman Jason from the Halloween series.


These posters are viscerally terrifying but definitely artistic. They totally capture the dark Gothic mood of the original 1941 film this one is based on. EMPIRE also has the third poster with Emily Blunt hiding in the woods, not as scary as you don’t see much of the Wolfman himself.

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According to IMDb, this movie was at first slated to hit cinemas in 2007, but difficulties to find a director made this release date impossible. Then a new release date was set for February 2009, then November 2009 and then finally February 12, 2010. Just in time to counter all those cutesy romance movies released on Valentine’s Day!