Thursday Movie Picks 2021: Oscar Winners Edition – Best Picture

ThursdayMoviePicksHappy first full week of 2021! It’s also the first TMP of the week. The Thursday Movie Picks blogathon was spearheaded by Wandering Through the Shelves Blog.

The rules are simple simple: Each week there is a topic for you to create a list of three movies. Your picks can either be favourites/best, worst, hidden gems, or if you’re up to it one of each. This Thursday’s theme is… Oscar Winners Edition – Best Picture.

Well, Oscar nominations isn’t coming out until March 15 this year, but naturally Oscar talks have already begun and film fans are likely making their predictions already. For this Best Picture edition however, I thought I’d take a walk down memory lane and pick from three different genres released in three different decades. I’m also picking those that I actually enjoy watching more than once.

In any case, here are my three picks:

The Sound of Music – 1965

Directed by Robert Wise

I’ve mentioned this a few times on this blog that this is one of the three VHS my late mother brought home from a European trip when I was in my early teens, which also marks my introduction to big Hollywood movies. The other two are also Oscar Best Picture winners: Gone with the Wind and My Fair Lady. 

I’ve since watched The Sound of Music at least a dozen times. I know a few of the songs by heart to this day, and there’s such a timeless quality to the story and obviously the music. Irwin Kostal also won an Oscar for Best Music in this movie, his second one after scoring West Side Story a few years prior. Well, both of the lead actors are still working today. In fact, it’s quite amusing to hear Dame Julie Andrews’ voice in Bridgerton series as Lady Whistledown.

Fun Trivia:

Christopher Plummer accidentally said the word “Captain” to Julie Andrews during the argument scene. Despite the error, producer and director Robert Wise thought it was that amusing, and liked it so much, he kept it in the movie.


Forrest Gump (1994)

Directed by Robert Zemeckis

I actually haven’t seen this one in a while but I’ve definitely seen it at least 2-3 times. It’s crazy that this movie is 26 years old already and Tom Hanks is still one of the best and most prolific actors working today. This is easily one of Hanks’ most memorable performance even in his illustrious career filled with indelible characters. It’s also one of the most quotable movies, some hilarious and some profound. It’s nice to see a character like Forrest Gump being such a popular icon… an earnest, good-to-the-bone human being that’s lacking any kind of malice, you could say he’s the modern day George Bailey.

Fun Trivia:
Tom Hanks signed onto this film after an hour and a half of reading the script, but agreed to take the role only on the condition that the film was historically accurate. He initially wanted to ease Forrest’s pronounced Southern accent, but was eventually persuaded by Robert Zemeckis to portray the heavy accent stressed in the novel, and he patterned his accent after Michael Conner Humphreys (young Forrest), who actually spoke that way.


The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003)

Directed by Peter Jackson

It’s quite rare for a big franchise film to get an Oscar nomination and this one won 11 Oscars, rivaling Titanic and Ben-Hur, the latter is one of my all time favorites. I actually think The Two Towers is as good if not better, which was also nominated for Oscar’s Best Picture. The Battle of Helm’s Deep is perhaps one of the most amazing battle scenes ever filmed. But of course, The Return of the King is a spectacular end to the trilogy, with Aragorn leading the forces of good against Sauron’s evil army. This was the first fantasy film to ever win Best Picture. It’s still a rarity for fantasy films to nab the award, though The Shape of Water did win Best Picture in 2017.

Fun Trivia:

The last shot of principal photography was when the newly-crowned Aragorn bows to the four Hobbits. Although Viggo Mortensen did not need to be on-set for that day, he nevertheless insisted on attending. He didn’t have a crown (it wasn’t necessary, he wasn’t being filmed), so he fashioned one out of paper. With each successive take, the crown was becoming more ornate and sillier as crew members kept decorating it, so the four actors playing the Hobbits often had difficulty suppressing their giggles.


What do you think of my picks? Have you seen any of them?

FlixChatter Review: TOLKIEN (2019)

Review by Vitali Gueron

When most people hear the name Tolkien, they might think of the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, (both of which were later turned into very successful film series by Peter Jackson, earning numerous accolades and awards) or they might think of English professor J. R. R. Tolkien (Nicholas Hoult), a poet, philologist, and academic who grew up relatively poor, never knew his father and lost his mother at a very young age. He was looked after by Father Francis Morgan, a Roman Catholic priest and former protege of Cardinal John Henry Newman, who served as Tolkien’s guardian and father figure. He attended King Edward’s School and met three of his best friends there. They formed a semi-secret society they called the T.C.B.S. The initials stood for Tea Club and Barrovian Society, alluding to their fondness for drinking tea in Barrow’s Stores near the school and, secretly, in the school library. The film Tolkien is much more about the young Tolkien, having meetings with his T.C.B.S. friends and then having to fight in World War I, and losing most of his close acquaintances as a result.

The teenager Tolkien (Harry Gilby) was at first a shy kid at King Edward’s School in Birmingham, England. Having moved there from Bloemfontein, South Africa where the family was living prior to Tolkien’s father’s death, his mother Mabel (Laura Donnelly) and brother Hilary Tolkien (played in youth by Guillermo Bedward and as an adult by James MacCallum) were new to Birmingham and didn’t have the means to live a comfortable live but were provided assistance by the Roman Catholic church. After Mabel’s death, Father Francis Morgan (Colm Meaney) took on the responsibility of guardianship of J. R. R. Tolkien, and advised him even during his years at Exeter College, Oxford. At the age of 16, Tolkien met Edith Mary Bratt (Lily Collins), who was three years his senior, when he and his brother Hilary moved into the boarding house where she lived in Duchess Road, Edgbaston. Tolkien falls in love with Edith, but is soon off to fight in World War I, leaving Edith for the time being.

While Tolkien is off fighting in the battles of World War I, he experiences first had the horrors of war, the death and destruction are just beneath his feet. He is shown throughout the film in the battle trenches and on the battle fields, fighting his own battles with trench fever. The scenes of battle, fire and death are what some believe gave him the inspiration for Mordor, the dark place where the arch-villain Sauron lives in the fictional world of Middle-earth, as told in the books of The Lord of the Rings. Tolkien is taken back to England and spends time at the hospital recovering and being back with Edith, but he also looses his close friends Geoffrey Bache Smith (Anthony Boyle) and Robert Q. Gilson (Patrick Gibson). His other friend and fellow T.C.B.S. member Christopher Wiseman (Tom Glynn-Carney) also comes back from war, but has many mental scars and never fully recovers from his wounds.

In the third act of the film, we see that Tolkien has married Edith and is starting to embrace fatherhood. He also meets with Geoffrey Bache Smith’s mother (Genevieve O’Reilly) and convinces her to publish some of Geoffrey’s poetry as a token to his memory. Part of Tolkien’s best memories before the war were spending time with his friends in the T.C.B.S. and forming what he later coined as the term “a fellowship” of friends. This is also the basis for the name of Tolkien’s first of three volumes in The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring.

Most casual fans of Tolkien, The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, might be a little disappointed in the film because it doesn’t have any of the fairytale or imaginative qualities that the fictional volumes that Tolkien wrote have. What the film does have are two strong performances by two young but compelling actors; Nicholas Hoult and Lily Collins. Their chemistry does not feel like its forced or out of place, and both help one another out by being interesting when sometimes the dialogue given to them is less so. I also especially like the moments when the young actors of Tolkien’s schoolboy life are on screen, headed by Harry Gilby, they form the Tea Club with fellow actors Adam Bregman, Albie Marber and Ty Tennant. These kids seem far more sophisticated and scholarly than normal kids, drinking tea at Barrow’s Stores and dreaming of worlds beyond their own.

Overall, this rather unimaginative film has a few shining moments, headlined by Hoult and Collins onscreen together. Strong followers of The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit might find deeper meaning in Tolkien’s life, but otherwise most audience members will be left empty-handed in understanding what really went on in Tolkien’s mind and how he was able to write such epic high fantasy novels. Maybe, just maybe, that part is up to us and in our imagination.


Have you seen TOLKIEN? Well, what did you think? 

Musings on the final Hobbit trilogy: The Battle of the Five Armies

TheHobbitBattleOfFiveArmies

Seems like it was ages ago since I saw the first Hobbit film. But in fact it was exactly two years ago that The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey was released. There were – and still are – quibbles about how a 320-page book warrants a three-film adaptation, and I was actually one of those people who didn’t mind it. I LOVED the Middle-Earth universe that J.R.R. Tolkien built, and The Lord of the Rings is perhaps my favorite film trilogy ever and so in my mind it was a worthwhile journey. The second film introduced us to the best CGI-dragon ever conceived on film, and so The Desolation of Smaug was even more exciting second chapter in The Hobbit journey. I listed 10 reasons why I loved that movie, with the wine barrel sequence and of course Smaug himself being the major highlights.

For some odd reason though, the third and final film just didn’t give me as much of a rush as the first two. I mean, I saw the trailer, then the second one, but I wasn’t feverishly anticipating it. In fact I didn’t even post hardly anything about it until I finally saw it early this month at a press screening. Perhaps I’m not the only one who’s feeling meh about the final Hobbit. Per EW, though the film won the box office this weekend with $56 mil, compared to the rest of the Hobbit films, The Battle of the Five Armies didn’t fare as well: The first film in the trilogy made $84.6 million its opening weekend while the second took in $73.6 million. The studio marketing machine emphasized on the phrase “One Last Time” and how one feels about such sentiment depends on how one feels on this franchise. As for me, as much as I’ve enjoyed the excursion to Middle Earth, there and back again as it were, I was ready to bid my farewell to Bilbo & co.

There are a few things that I love about the first two films that I still like this time around, so let’s start with those…

  • I still love Martin Freeman as Bilbo, he’s just so easy to root for. He pretty much is the most selfless character in the whole Middle Earth, and he pretty much risk his neck every time he goes out of his way to prevent war. I’ve always liked his casting and not only he has a believable resemblance to Ian Holm but he has that manic energy and whimsical antics that makes him so fun to watch.TheHobbit3_Bilbo
  • The character arc of Thorin is a strong one here, and Richard Armitage shows that inner conflict convincingly. The role takes advantage of the actor’s specialty of projecting ‘dark, brooding, conflicted’ in a magnetic way. The scenes where he struggles with the dragon sickness is one of the main highlights in the film, though how he recovers from it seems too quick and too easy, and perhaps there’s more of it that’s left in the cutting room floor?
    TheHobbit3_Thorin///
  • The slithery Smaug, voiced by Benedict Cumberbatch, is still awesome to behold. I’d say if there is one thing that makes it worthwhile to see The Hobbit movies in 3D glory, it’d be to see Smaug. Too bad the fire-breathing dragon didn’t quite have much screen time despite that awesome cliffhanger we saw in the second film. The action-packed sequence in Lake Town, involving Bard the Bowman (Luke Evans) doing what he does best, is thrilling to watch. The special effects with Dolby Atmos sound is especially incredible in this sequence and I have to admit I wish Smaug had more screen time. But of course, he’s done his duties… that is to lead everyone to the main event: The Battles of the Five Armies.

    TheHobbit3_Smaug

Now, people who have been anticipating the battle sequences, this movie certainly delivers. It’s amazing how in the book, the only reference to the battle only amounts to a sentence, but here we’ve got at least a whole hour worth of battle sequences. We’ve got the Dwarves, Laketown people, and the Elves fighting a whole bunch of Orcs and Goblins, including a whole army of the Dol Guldur Orcs that are supposedly VERY scary and powerful.

That brings me to the not-so-good things about this film:

  • You’d think that the battle would be the most exciting part of the film, I mean I was expecting something in the vein of Battle of Helms Deep in LOTR: Two Towers, which was one of the most amazing rain scenes ever filmed, but it’s not even close. Somehow I find the whole sequence to be rather boring and by the end of it, I was getting so battle fatigue I couldn’t care less who wins. It’s hard enough to keep up with the current participants as it is, we’ve got Thorin’s cousin, Dwarves of the Iron Hills, joining in. Led by Billy Connolly whose accent is so distracting it’s hard to concentrate on what the heck is going on. I have to admit that my mind wandered for most of the battle scenes. In fact, I started noticing the strange looking codpiece that Azog, the Orc chief, is wearing. Seriously, I never noticed that before but I couldn’t stop giggling once I noticed that.
    TheHobbit3_AzogOrcs
  • I think the battle would’ve held more meaning to me if I had a firm grasp just what’s really at stake here. But even those lovable dwarves in the first two films just aren’t so fun here as they’re barely even in the movie! Even the dramatic tension surrounding the Arkenstone of Thrain, that is THE single most important gem of the whole Erebor’s vast treasure, just wasn’t as compelling as I’d imagine. I get that it’s a family heirloom for generations until it’s lost to Smaug, but somewhere along the way, its significance to the people is dwarfed (pardon the pun) by the overwhelming visual spectacle and action extravaganza. What’s worse is that the two main characters, Bilbo and Gandalf, often end up in the sidelines during most of the action. I don’t know why Peter Jackson would rather give a lot of screen time to Alfrid (Ryan Gage), the conniving servant of the Laketown Master, that doesn’t serve the story much at all. He sort of became a comic relief by the end before he disappeared and never to be seen again.
    … 
  • The unnecessary and uninvolving romance between Tauriel and Kili is once again aggravating because it’s yet additional filler on top of the already piled-up filler to make up the three films. I literally roll my eyes every time they appear on screen and the repeated farewell scenes. No offense to Evangeline Lily and Adrian Turner but really, I feel nothing for their characters and their supposed *relationship.* Meanwhile, Legolas (played by the eternally youthful Orlando Bloom) is reduced to nothing more than a Ninja Elf with his Matrix-like moves. Never mind the character inconsistencies with the follow-up movies, when the fight scene was over, some people actually applauded him in the theater.
    TheHobbit3_TaurielKili
  • Despite all of those thrilling fight and battle sequences, I was left feeling meh and unfazed. Even when one major character perished, followed by yet another seemingly-endless farewell, I still remain emotionally-detached. I mean I cried when Boromir met his end and I still get teary-eyed thinking about that scene. Now, it’s no fault to the actors in The Hobbit as I think they all did a good job in their respective roles, but more of a problem with the script (done by no less than FOUR writers: Fran Walsh, Philippa Boyens, Peter Jackson and Guillermo del Toro).
  • The scenes with Gandalf, Galadriel and Saruman as they battle the evil Sauron seems disconnected with the battle of the five armies. I don’t know if it’s the choppy editing or that simply an issue that there are just too much going on. In the Lord of the Rings, it’s clear who the main enemy is, but The Hobbit trilogy overall lacks the focus that gives the quest real meaning.
  • [SPOILER WARNING]
    Towards the end, there’s all these references to The Lord of the Rings. Thranduil (Lee Pace) told Legolas to find Aragorn, even though he didn’t specifically mentioned his name, it’s obvious who he’s referring to. Now, I don’t know how old Aragorn is supposed to be during The Hobbit timeframe, but this scene just feels forced to me. Pretty much every reference to LOTR, whether it’s Bilbo playing with the ring, the appearance of the demon Sauron, feels like nothing more than nostalgia. I suppose the continuity is to be expected, but it just further proves how much The Hobbit as a franchise just won’t hold up on its own and it reinforces the fact that they don’t measure up to LOTR movies.

TheHobbit3_ThranduilBard

In summary, the final Hobbit does have its moments and some of the action sequences are pretty entertaining. The attention to detail is amazing too, there’s really a lot to marvel in terms of visuals, and I remember ooh-aahing Thranduil’s Elven Elk with its majestic antlers. But overall, there are more bad than good here, which is pretty disappointing. I expected something more epic in terms of story, not just visual spectacle. It’s actually the shortest of all the Hobbit movies, only 144 min compared to 169 and 161 min of the previous two films, yet I checked my watch the most often whilst watching this. I’d think that even the most ardent Middle Earth fans should feel relieved that it’s finally over, if only it could’ve ended on a much higher note.

I don’t think I’ll be revisiting the Hobbit movies anytime soon, but for what it’s worth, it does make me want to rewatch my Lord of the Rings extended box-set.

2halfReels


Well, what did you think of the final Hobbit movie? 

The Alphabet Movie Meme

AlphabetMovieMeme Boy it’s been a while since I did a movie meme, but this idea by Katy at the Drama Llama is just too fun to resist. Thanks Karamel Kinema for the awesome banner image. Well, it’s pretty self-explanatory what this meme is all about, so lets just get started.

Anticipating Movie of 2014

XMenDaysOfFuturePast

I was going to answer Interstellar but that Nolan movie isn’t out until November so I set my sight to something a bit closer that’s out in May. The trailer for X-Men Days of Future Past makes my head spins but it also gets me super psyched to see it!

Book Adaptation I’d Love To See

BookAdaptation_LoveWalkedIn

A couple of years ago I posted this list of books my pal Ted and I would like to see being adapted on screen. I haven’t read hardly any good book since (yes I wish I were a voracious reader) but out of those, I’d think this one would’ve been adapted by now. It’s an unusual love story in that it’s not just between a man and a woman, and it’s got a slight throwback to Hollywood’s golden era that I think would be cool to see on screen.

Celebrity I’d Most Like To Meet

Male

RA_Bafta_Closeup

I simply have to find out if Richard Armitage actually looks THIS perfect up close. He seems like an intelligent bloke, so I’m sure he’d make a fascinating company over coffee … and I wonder if I could ever beat him in a staring contest 😉

Female

CateBlanchett

I bow to the great Cate Blanchett. She is such a phenomenal actress whose beauty, intellect and immense talent makes her a modern screen legend.

Dream Director-Actor Pairing

Michael Mann and Tom Hiddleston

Mann_Hiddleston

I love Michael Mann’s cerebral thrillers. I’d love to see the exquisite Tom Hiddleston tackles something like Heat, The Insider or even playing a chilling baddie like Tom Cruise in Collateral. The versatile Brit can do anything, I’d love to see him display his range.

Essential Classic Film

Roman Holiday

RomanHoliday

It remains one of the most romantic and beautifully-shot film ever, starring two of my all time favorite movie couple. I’ve listed 59 reasons why it’s awesome. I’m sure I can come up with more.

Favorite Film Franchise

The Lord of the Rings

LOTR_trilogy

One of these days I have GOT to find time to watch the extended version. It’s nothing short of astonishing how Peter Jackson has brought J.R.R. Tolkien’s stupendous literary work to life.

Genre(s) I Watch The Most

Action Thriller and Period Drama

Action_PeriodDramaGenres

I think I watch these two genres as frequently. It should be no surprise that most of them have a British cast 😉

Hidden Gem

Dear Frankie

DearFrankie

There are many other movie gems I could recommend but I always go with this one as it was made with a itsy-bitsy budget, but the story, Scottish setting, and acting are all superb that I wish more people would see it.

Important Moment in My Film Life

FlixChatterLOGOMy passion for movies practically soars exponentially after I started blogging. Thanks to fellow cinephiles who inspire me every day and makes me love movies all the more!

Just Right for A Rainy Day

Sleepless in Seattle

SleeplessInSeattle

“It rains nine months of the year in Seattle.” Well if one day I move to Seattle, I’d be happy to still be watching this whilst I’m vegging out on the sofa. I LOVE LOVE LOVE this movie, Nora Ephron’s script is so brilliant that it kept this movie from being unbearably sappy. If only rom-coms today are half as good as this.

Kiddie Movie I Still Shamelessly Enjoy

Sleeping Beauty

SleepingBeautyBriarRose

I’ve loved this as a kid and Briar Rose/Aurora is my favorite Disney princess! Even to this day, before all the CGI technology in animation, the visuals are still amazingly beautiful, and the music based on Tchaikovsky’s ballet is equally enchanting.

Location I’d Most Like To Visit

RivendellMiddleEarth

No doubt it’d be Middle Earth, especially if Aragorn or Thorin would be willing to be my tour guide 😉

Marathons I Watched

Gregory Peck Movie Marathon

GregPeckDVDCase

Some of you likely remember when I was besotted by this Hollywood’s classic leading man. I blogged about some of ’em already, that’s perhaps the last extensive movie marathon I did, which was well worth the effort!

Netflix Movie I Actually Watched

I have Netflix Streaming which is one my the primary sources to rent movies from. This is the last one I rented as they’ve got quite a nice selections of documentaries. Clearly I’m fascinated by all things Middle Earth.

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One Movie I Saw In Theaters More Than Once

Idris_PacRim

I’ll go with the latest one I saw twice in the theater in 2013, and that’d be Pacific Rim. I’m not ashamed to say that I LOVE that movie, and really, when you’ve got exhilarating action, great music PLUS sexy Idris Elba as Stacker Pentecost in his smashing black armored Jaeger suit, what’s not to love?

Preferred Place To Watch A Movie (Cinema or at home)

Either place is fine by me. As much as I love the comfort of watching films whilst vegging out on my sofa, some films are meant to be seen on the big screen. Unless of course I have a home cinema like THIS.

DreamHomeCinema

Quote that Inspires Me

The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers

SamFrodo_TwoTowers

Samwise Gamgee, is one of the most selfless and wisest movie characters ever brought on screen. The unsung hero of the LOTR trilogy always puts others first before his own. Apparently when Tolkien wrote him, he was inspired by the character of English soldiers he met during World War I.

Remakes (Friend or Foe?)

Generally speaking… foe. But not every remake is terrible. I actually like the Coen Brothers’ True Grit, Sydney Pollack’s Sabrina, Peter Jackson’s King Kong, James Mangold’s 3:10 To Yuma, just to name a few.

Ben-Hur1959

Heck, even one of my favorite films of all time, Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ is a remake of the 1925 silent film with the same name.

Snack I Enjoy Most

Peanuts

FaveSnack_Peanuts

Twist(s) That Boggles My Mind

Sixth Sense & Unbreakable

SixthSense_Unbreakable_Finale

Whatever has happened to M. Night now, it doesn’t change the fact that Sixth Sense and Unbreakable, which he made back to back, are both phenomenal films. Both endings floored me, and it was such a great feeling when a film managed to surprise you in such a big way.

Unapologetic Fanperson For

Timothy Dalton

TimothyDalton

Dalton seems to have always marched to the beat of his own drum and I love him for it. He’s so criminally underrated and I’m front of the line in the Dalton-is-Best-Bond brigade. He’s obviously fantastic as a hero, byronic (Jane Eyre) or otherwise, but also as a villain (The Rocketeer).

Very Excited For Award Show Season?

Sure, why not. Bring. It. On.

Wish I Never Watched…

The Exorcist

TheExorcist

I really wish I hadn’t seen this. THAT face still haunts me to this day. I remember that after watching it in college, I asked my then boyfriend (now my hubby) to sleep in the living room as I didn’t dare to be alone in my apartment!!

XXX Movie I First Watched At A Young Age (R or NC-17!)

I don’t remember the name of it, as all I remember was that it has ‘Girl’ in it in the title. It could’ve been a foreign film as it was in black and white. I must’ve been only 11 or so, but that was the first time I saw full frontal nudity on screen!

Your latest movie-related obsession

Hmmm, does Richard Armitage count? He’s my latest obsession and he’s a movie actor so yeah, that’s my answer right now. My formerly-Gregory-Peck-filled Tumblr‘s been pretty much been taken over that beautiful man. Yes, I think I’m secretly moving up the rank in the Armitage Army 😉

ZZZ-Catchers (name a movie that has put you to sleep)

The Great Gatsby (1974)
GreatGatsby1974
Say what you will about the Baz Luhrmann’s film but at least it wasn’t boring! I was thinking of comparing this one to the contemporary version but I couldn’t even go through it! I finally turned it off after I dozed off a couple of times.

Well that’s my Alphabet Movie Meme, folks! Feel free to continue this movie meme (make sure you link back to Katy’s post). I’d love to see the answers you come up with!

[Fan] Poster Spotlight: Man of Steel + Q&A w/ designer Patrick Connan

It’s been a while since I’ve done a Poster Spotlight, so I thought it’s time to do one as part of the Man of Steel Countdown!

I first noticed this poster last week when I came across a tweet from the movie’s official Twitter account. Here’s the beautiful poster titled…

Dark Side of the Man

DarkSideOftheManPoster
Click image to see a larger version


Isn’t that awesome? I love the simplicity of the design, yet it has so much energy to it. Seems that fan-made posters are getting more and more creative these days, way better than the ones the studios churn out. I checked out the Barbarian Factory blog and was quite blown away by other poster designs featured there, including the ones for Star Trek (the JJ Abrams reboot) and The Lord of the Rings. I decided to contact the designer via Twitter and Parisian-based designer Patrick Connan kindly obliged for a quick Q&A. Read on:

1. How long have you been a designer & do you specifically do poster designs?

I am a graphic designer for almost 10 years, it has been 5 years since I worked for a very large Parisian agency specializing in the design of film posters. Being a huge fan of movies, I have to admit that I finally get to combine my two passions!

2. I notice you have a ton of film-related posters on your blog, when did you start designing those? I presume you also run the Geek Art website?

Indeed, as I said earlier, being passionate about cinema I like to give my perspective on a film that I liked and I eagerly awaits! I decided to work for me, in addition to my daily work in my office since the beginning of March this year. It came to me like that, all of a sudden I wanted to illustrate the bad-ass movies I loved as a kid, and then many other things, and since I can’t stop doing stuffs!!! No, I am not the manager of the Geek-Art.net site, but thanks to Thomas Olivri (Master & Commander of geek-art) my visibility on the net could be powered with my series on the Lord of the Rings, and for this, I can not thank him enough!

3. What tools do you use to create the posters?

I mostly use Illustrator and Photoshop to create my posters, and of course the layout using InDesign! I work with my tablet mainly. Once I have more space in my apartment I can finally get back to draw, because of lack of space I have to put it aside!

4. Are you a fan of Superman in general? What inspires you to design the Man of Steel poster?

I’m sure there are fans more diligent than me about Superman, however I adored watching old movies and series with Dean Cain and Teri Hatcher when I was a kid! I have never had the opportunity to read some comics, because in France there is not the same enthusiasm for them in the United States for example. For this poster I wanted to give a retro look, original and minimalist, and the parallel with the Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon seemed to flow naturally!

5. Tell us anything you’d like us to know about your movie poster design and when it’ll be available for sale.

Thanks Patrick for the quick interview … and for creating such an awesome poster!

Now, before I sign off, I’ve got to share this final Man of Steel trailer. I’m running out of words already to express how I feel about this film… every trailer just gets better and better. So just watch it. now.

I know you want to 😀


Check out the other Man of Steel Countdown posts from the past three weeks

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What do you think of the poster & this latest trailer?