Music Break: Ten Favorite Oscar-Winning Film Scores

TenFaveOscarWinningScores

The Oscars is just a week away, folks! Well, a week ago, as I was listening to 99.5 Classical MPR they were playing my favorite score from Titanic and I knew I had to make a post of it. For this post I’m focusing more on the instrumental themes instead of the songs, hence my exclusion of Sound of Music, My Fair Lady, etc. Y’know, I’m still surprised that some of my all time fave scores did NOT win an Oscar, i.e. Gone with the Wind, Superman, Indiana Jones, Gladiator, The Hours, and The Passion of the Christ, just to name a few. Heck, the one I considered one of the greatest scores ever, Somewhere in Time, wasn’t even nominated! But its composer John Barry had been nominated six times. John Williams, the reigning champion of the most-nominated composer ever with 44 (he beat Alfred Newman who had 43 noms) have made some truly iconic scores, but my faves did not win, so I only included the one I love the most.

Thanks to Wikipedia for making it easy for me to see the winners all the way from the 1930s. Now, I’ve seen most of the films the scores appear in, with a couple of exceptions (Out of Africa and Dances with Wolves). So in any case, here are my Top 10 Fave Oscar-Winning Scores, in order of release:

BEN-HUR – Miklós Rózsa

Ever since I saw this as a young girl with my late mother, few films have touched me as much as Ben-Hur did and Rozsa’s score is one of the reasons it’s such an enduring epic.

 

Lawrence of Arabia – Maurice Jarre

I actually just saw this film two years ago but I’ve heard the soundtrack years before and it’s remained one of my favorites!

 

Out of Africa – John Barry

Ahhh John Barry… nobody could create a more lush and devastatingly gorgeous music that pierces your soul. I haven’t seen the film yet but I’m actually afraid the music would actually eclipse the film itself.

 

The Little Mermaid – Alan Menken

I grew up listening to all Disney Princess songs and I somehow identified with Ariel’s loneliness and her yearning to belong in someone else’s world. Mr. Menken is an absolute musical genius in that he somehow could capture the sentiment of her character.

I also have a special fondness for the Caribbean-influenced style of Under the Sea. I LOVE the little crab Sebastian so much I actually bought the tiny stuffed animal, and I’m still using The Little Mermaid‘s beach towel to this day 😀

 

Schindler’s List – John Williams

Perhaps one of the most hauntingly-beautiful music ever conceived. I never NOT tear up whenever I listen to this. Itzhak Perlman‘s violin solo adds so much to the piece, making it ever so unforgettable.

 

Beauty & The Beast – Alan Menken

I was just listening to this the other day and out of all the music in the wonderful album, this has to be my favorite. Yes, it even beats the more popular Tale as old as time. The scene itself of the Beast’s transformation is beautifully-done and it always packs such an emotional punch.

 

Dances with Wolves – John Barry

Another one by John Barry, can’t you tell I absolute LOVE this man’s work? I really should see this film already, as I’ve listened to the soundtrack more often than I can count.

 

Titanic – James Horner

THIS is the piece that was played in Classical MPR on my way home from work last week. I’m glad they chose to play Take Her to Sea Mr Murdock instead of the massively popular My Heart Will Go On. I always remember the first time I beheld the majestic ocean liner on the big screen and there’s a lump in my throat when that music came on. There’s such an energy to it, a joyful optimism of that day that’s so infectious, which makes the doom fate of Titanic later on in the film even more heart-wrenching.

 

The Lord of the Rings: Return of the King – Howard Shore

I really think the soundtrack of the entire trilogy is simply exceptional. It’s just as epic as Peter Jackson’s creation and it really transport you into the realm of Middle Earth!

 

The Artist – Ludovic Bource

The strength of a lot of silent films is the soundtrack and The Artist is no exception. I love most of the tracks but this waltz is my absolute favorite. I LOVE Bérénice Bejo in the role, this music is as pretty and playful as Peppy herself, there’s such a wistful nostalgic vibe that takes you back to those Chaplin classics.


Hope you enjoyed this week’s music break! Which of these Oscar-winning score(s) is your favorite?

The Spielberg Blogathon: Reminiscing about Raiders of the Lost Ark & Jurassic Park

SpielbergBlogathon

This post is part of the SPIELBERG BLOGATHON hosted by Outspoken & Freckled, It Rains… You Get Wet, and Once Upon A Screen taking place August 23-24. Please visit these host blogs for a full list of participating blogs

TedSaydalavongBanner

When Ruth asked me to participate in the Steven Spielberg blogathon, I wasn’t sure what to write about so I figured I should do a write up about two films of his that I’ve watched many times. These two films also made me into a film fanatic and home theater enthusiast that I am today.

Raiders of the Lost Ark

I was born in the Far East and the martial arts films was the only genre I’d watch, but after seeing this film I became a fan of American action films. I think I was about 8 or 9 years old when I first saw this film, my family and I were living in the Philippines Islands at the time and I saw it at some old movie theater. I was too young to really understood what the film was about but the visual and of course the action pulled me in. I still remember that the film’s climatic scene gave me nightmares, I freaked out when I saw the villains’ faces melt off and they were burned alive.

But I still thought the film was magic and when my family and I arrived to the States a year later, I begged my parents to buy me a VHS copy of the film. What’s so funny was that I didn’t know there were sequels until I saw a TV spot of The Last Crusade the year we arrived in the States. Unfortunately I didn’t get to see the third film on the big screen but watched it several times on VHS. Then a couple of years later I watched Temple of Doom on the old Sci-Fi Channel. I enjoyed the two sequels but to me Raiders is still the best in the series.

RaidersOftheLostArk

I’ve owned this film on many formats, first I had the VHS copy then later when I was able to afford a LaserDisc player, I bought a LD version of the film. When DVD became popular, I of course bought the DVD set then just a couple of years ago I got the Bluray set, unfortunately I had to buy the dreadful fourth film too.

Since Spielberg is a big fan of David Lean and Lawrence of Arabia is one of his favorite films, he even stated that the film’s script is the best ever written, so Raiders of the Lost Ark was his ultimate tribute to Lean’s classic film.

 

Jurassic Park

The summer of 1993 was dubbed Arnold vs. Sly since both of those action stars had two big films opening in the same summer and the so-called industry “experts” predicted that Sly’s Cliffhanger and Arnold’s Last Action Hero would dominate the box office. Of course Spielberg’s Jurassic Park was also one of the hyped up films but no one expected it would stomped both Sly’s and Arnold’s films. Sure I was excited to see new action films from Sly and Arnold but I super excited to see this film about dinosaurs. It’s one of the first films to have included full CGI effects in many scenes and it’s about dinosaurs!

Yes, like many kids back in those days, I was obsessed with dinosaurs and I’ve just finished Michael Crichton’s novel that it’s based on. I still remember to this day which theater I saw the film at on opening weekend and still remember how at awe I was after the film was over. The first time I saw the CGI dinosaurs, my jaw dropped and throughout the film, I had a smile on my face. It’s one of the best experiences I’ve ever had at the cinemas. I actually went to see the film twice on the opening weekend, around this time digital surround sound was pretty new in movie theaters so I wanted to hear the T-Rex’s roar in full digital sound over and over again. I was bummed that I couldn’t make it to the re-release on IMAX last year. With an opening weekend of over $50mil, it’s a record opening at that time. I think the summer of 1993 should’ve been called, T-Rex stomped Sly and Arnold.

JurassicParkStills

Like Raiders of the Lost Ark, I’ve owned this film on many formats. First VHS then LaserDisc and years later on DVD. Recently I bought it on Bluray but I have yet to watch it. Apparently Universal didn’t give the film a proper HD transfer so I was hesitant to buy it. Since I haven’t watched the film in a couple of years, I need to see and hear it in HD soon. This film also turned me into a home theater enthusiast, as mentioned earlier, I saw the film at a theater that has the new digital surround sound and after experiencing that, I wanted to have a home theater. Of course being a high school kid, I didn’t have the money to buy home theater products yet. But as I’ve gotten older and can earn bigger pay checks, I’ve invested some good amount of cash on home entertainment. In a way, I can thank and blame this Spielberg’s film for making me obsess with home theater.

Spielberg is one of the best filmmakers ever and these two films proved that he can make films that can please both the critics and audiences.

TedS_post


What do you think of these two films, were you lucky enough to have seen them on the big screen? Do share your memories on the comments section.

Guest Post: A tribute to PETER O’TOOLE – He will be missed but certainly not forgotten

Huge thanks to Dave W. for this special tribute of his personal favorite thespian


PeterOTooleTribute

Peter O’Toole – Always a Bridesmaid, Never a Bride

With the passing of Peter O’Toole at age 81 this past weekend cinema has lost one of the truly great actors in the history of film. I thought it fitting to honor him as he was a personal favorite of mine. He has been out of the limelight for some time since he retired from acting but his legacy should not be forgotten. This truly was a man who commanded the silver screen as few ever have.

It was once suggested by playwright Noël Coward that if Peter O’Toole was any prettier that he would have been called “Florence of Arabia”. With handsome looks and his devil-may-care attitude, he became quite known for cavorting about town with his close pals Richard Burton and Richard Harris when it was still considered ‘charming’ to be an alcoholic. Consider the time that Peter and Peter Finch (Network) were refused last orders in a pub. Not to be deterred, they whipped out their checkbooks and bought the pub. Realizing what they did the next day they went down to the pub to find that the owner hadn’t cashed their checks and he graciously offered to rip them up. They soon became fast friends and even attend the owner’s funeral a year later. Of course they showed up at the wrong one. Standing their sobbing while their friend was being put to rest 100 yards away. As Peter famously said of himself “I loved the drinking, and waking up in the morning to find I was in Mexico,” “It was part and parcel of being an idiot.”

OToole_RichardHarris
O’Toole with one of his ‘Hellraiser’ buddies Richard Harris

What shouldn’t be lost is what a tremendous actor he really was despite all his bad boy behavior. Sadly he’s is known for having the most Oscar nominations without a win (8). When told he’d be receiving an honorary Oscar he replied in a letter to the academy “I am still in the game and might win the lovely bugger outright. Would the Academy please defer the honor until I am 80?” After some convincing he finally accepted his long overdue Oscar from the Academy.

While not a definitive list, here’s 5 good places to start to see what all the fuss is about.

LAWRENCE OF ARABIA

To say that they don’t make ‘em like they used to anymore is an understatement. Required viewing for any serious film buff this film is at the apex of great filmmaking. Peter’s first major film role as T.E. Lawrence was a performance for the ages. If there was ever a film meant to be seen on the big screen David Lean’s epic was it… and I’ve been lucky enough to see it twice in the theater.

THE LION IN WINTER

The Lion In Winter was actually Anthony Hopkins first film role. In this clip he speaks graciously of working with O’Toole and Hepburn. Watching these titans go head to head in person must have been something to see for the fledgling actor.

Peter sent the script to Katherine only a week after her longtime love Spencer Tracy died. She phoned up right away and said “I might as well do it before I die.” Unbeknownst to many O’Toole was quite fond of Katherine Hepburn. Although he has never publicly talked about their relationship, he later admitted he worshipped Hepburn. “I loved her, no question, in the proper platonic sense but, yes, I loved her. We were filming one day and I kept her waiting on set because I was still in my caravan, playing cards. She stormed in and shouted: “You are a real nut and I’ve met some nuts in my day.” And then she hit me. A couple of hours later, I went to see her and gave her a present to say I was sorry for keeping her waiting.  She said: “Don’t worry, pig. I only hit the people I love.” Pig. LOL.

THE STUNT MAN

The Stunt Man was a kind of rebirth for Peter in the 80’s. With his career flagging… the bombastic, over the top, perfectly suited role of Eli Cross, a tyrannical film director whose ego knew no boundaries, came along. One of the best “films within a film” ever made. Even if a bit dated and Steve Railsback’s performance is not so great it’s still a great watch. Peter said of the film upon finally being released after being unable to find a distributor, “This film didn’t get released, it escaped.”

MY FAVORITE YEAR

Following on the heels of The Stunt Man came another winner in My Favorite Year.  Swashbuckling actor Allan Swann (read: Errol Flynn) is a washed-up, boozing womanizer who’s the idol of a young, idealistic TV writer Benjy Stone. Swann is in town to do a guest spot on a variety show, Benjy must babysit the perpetually inebriated actor and that’s when the hijinks ensue. It’s a nostalgic look at 50’s TV and one can’t but help but feel the character of Allan Swann in not that much of a stretch for the perpetually inebriated O’Toole. Mel Brooks executive produced the film basing Mark Linn-Baker’s character Benjy on himself and Woody Allen who wrote for Sid Caesar’s Your Show of Shows.

VENUS

Some 24 years passed between My Favorite Year and Venus for Peter to receive his last Academy Award nomination but what a charming, sweet performance to go out on. Falling for a girl, Jessie, 50 years his junior, who is out to care for him, he walks a fine line with his delicate performance of a man who’s found love in the twilight of his life. The film never gets creepy or maudlin thanks to the fine direction and performances. Watch out for Vanessa Redgrave who plays a small but wonderful bit part in this. The scene below with Jessie (Venus), a young Jodie Whittaker of Broadchurch fame, has Peter quoting Shakespeare… like only he can.

While the above films are a good start feel free to delve into his other works like Beckett, Goodbye Mr. Chips, The Ruling Class, Lord Jim, etc. A talent like this doesn’t come around very often.

Peter O’Toole will be missed but certainly not forgotten.


So in celebration of his wonderful work, what’s YOUR favorite Peter O’Toole film?

The Weekend That Was… RIP Peter O’Toole & Interstellar teaser

How’s your weekend everyone? Was it an eventful one or busy with Christmas shopping? Well, the arctic air still hasn’t left us yet, it’s really getting pathetic that we got excited when temps go even 15 above zero! Today it’s almost 30˚ F and boy did it feel good! Here’s a recap of what I saw, as well as a few film-related events happening this weekend:

Well this weekend I got to see the new *rePOTO_CameronMackintoshimagined* version of The Phantom of the Opera, created by Cameron Mackintosh. It’s incredible that POTO is celebrating 25 years on Broadway this year and this new production — with a new set, choreography, lighting and scenic design — has premiered in the UK last year. This is the third time I saw POTO on stage and I was mesmerized once again. It’s really all about those gorgeous, haunting music and the younger cast definitely bring the story to life. I LOVE the stage production but it also makes me appreciate the 2004 film with Gerry Butler in the title role, which is decidedly faithful to the stage version. I appreciate both format but the nice thing about the film is that I can easily watch that over and over again on my Blu-ray 😀

As I saw three advanced screening during the weekThe Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug (check out my thoughts on the movie), Saving Mr. Banks and Inside Llewyn Davis), so this weekend I opted for home cinema. Thanks to Kim and Fernando for recommending these two animated features.

GiftOfNightFury
As a big fan of How to Train Your Dragon, I definitely enjoyed this short film immensely. The baby dragons are as adorable as ever, but once again, the relationship between Hiccup and Toothless the Night Fury is at the heart of it. I can’t wait for the follow-up to HTTYD coming next year!

HunchbackOfNotreDame

I actually have seen Hunchback of Notre Dame a long time ago but for some reason I didn’t remember much of it. It’s darker than the average Disney animated features, but the story demands it so it works well here. Of course it’s not without the conventional Disney ballads and goofy-but-endearing characters, but the story definitely has a good message of good vs. evil and a heartwarming tale about the triumph of the outcasts.


This weekend, we saw the passing of a true Hollywood legend, Peter O’Toole. Apparently he was being treated at London’s Wellington hospital after a long illness. He was 81.

RIP_PeterOToole

I had just seen his most iconic role in Lawrence of Arabia for the first time earlier this year. In fact, I got the Blu-ray version and both my husband and I was really blown away by it. It definitely lives up to the masterpiece status, both the film and Mr. O’Toole’s performance are hugely iconic. I have only seen Mr. O’Toole in The Lion in Winter, his cameo in One Night with the King, and his voice work in Ratatouille. I should try to see his comedic work in My Favorite Year (which my friend Kevin has reviewed here) and How To Steal A Million with Audrey Hepburn.

Farewell Mr. O’Toole, may you rest in peace.


INTERSTELLARbnr

As 2013 draws to a close, soon comes a time of huge buzz and anticipation for 2014 movies. One of the big ones is Christopher Nolan’s sci-fi INTERSTELLAR. I just had to post the trailer here in case you haven’t seen it yet:

In the future, governments and economies across the globe have collapsed, food is scarce, NASA is no more, and the 20th Century is to blame. A mysterious rip in spacetime opens and it’s up to whatever is left of NASA to explore and offer up hope for mankind.

Ok so yes I’m a bit of a Nolan groupie but his trailers always get me salivating and frustrated that we have to wait a whole year for this!! The story is intriguing and mysterious, as every Nolan film is shrouded in secrecy. But the cast also got me excited. Matthew McConaughey is hotter than hot right now and I LOVE Jessica Chastain, plus the supporting cast looks great with Nolan regular Michael Caine, John Lithgow, David Oyelowo, Anne Hathaway and Casey Affleck!

Oh, I also just came across this brilliant fan-made, crossover video from episodes of BBC’s Dr. Who and Sherlock. It’s too awesome not to share:


Well, that’s the weekend recap folks, what did you watch this weekend?

Question of the Week: What’s your favorite biopic(s)?

A biographical film, or biopic (/ˈbɵpɪk/; abbreviation for biographical motion picture), is a film that dramatizes the life of an actual person or people.

JeannedArcThis week I saw two press screenings (The Butler and Jobs) that are both based on real-life characters. So I thought I’d blog about one of Hollywood’s favorite genre [or is it sub-genre?]. There are a plethora of biopics getting made every single year. I mean, if you look at this list of biopics in Wikipedia, the number is in the thousands, dating all the way to the year 1900 with short, silent film Jeanne d’Arc by Georges Méliès — clearly Joan of Arc is a popular subject that’s been filmed time and time again. Just in 2000s alone, there are nearly 500 biopics in just one decade! I think biopics have become a favorite for actors to portray, perhaps because they tend to be popular come award season. A bunch of actors have won Oscars portraying real-life characters, as Daniel Day Lewis did most recently playing President Lincoln.

Obviously, just like any genre/sub-genre, there are good and bad biopics, and there’ll never be a shortage of them in the years to come. I for one don’t mind them, especially when the subject matter are intriguing and even inspiring. I prefer biopics that focus on a certain period of the person’s life instead of an overarching biography, just because it’s so challenging to do the latter and make it compelling. I’m excluding documentaries for this post, as it’s kind of a whole different genre entirely.

If I were to choose my top 10 favorites from what I’ve seen, it’d probably look something like this (in no particular order):

  1. Schindler’s List (1993)
  2. Veronica Guerin (2003)
  3. Ray (2004)
  4. The Insider (1999)
  5. Lawrence of Arabia (1962)
  6. Elizabeth (1998)
  7. Hotel Rwanda (2004)
  8. Amazing Grace (2006)
  9. The Queen (2006)
  10. Walk The Line (2005)

5 Honorable Mentions: Amadeus, The King’s Speech, The Fighter, Nowhere Boy, The Aviator

I say ‘favorite’ because a large part of how well we receive a biopic is how much we care about the subject matter. I mean, I’m fascinated by royal families (esp. British), but I know some people don’t and they probably aren’t going to be keen on films about them. Of course another big thing is how well we think the actors portray the real-life persona on screen, physical resemblance notwithstanding. Keep in mind I haven’t seen some of the essentials like Gandhi, Citizen Kane, The Passion of Joan of Arc, Ragging Bull, etc.


So my question to you two-fold… do you like Biopics and which ones are your favorite?

Monthly Roundup: What I Watched in March

Well, it’s been fun folks! After about three + years of blogging… FlixChatter is closing up shop so this is the last monthly recap you’ll see on this blog. THANK YOU for being such loyal supporters of this blog… I really appreciate your readership and all the wonderful comments. I’ll be moving to Antarctica next week on a secret expedition, and that is why I haven’t mentioned about it on Twitter nor on the blog. I’d imagine it’d be tough to be online whilst I’m on the ship… so for now, I wish you all a wonderful Spring season and hope to see you all again soon!

MikeWazowkiAprilFools He..he.. did I fool you a bit there? 😀 Sorry folks, can’t help myself. Nah, I’m not giving up blogging that easily, sorry to disappoint you, ahah. I meant every word about being thankful for all your support though! MarchRecap Well, March has been relatively slow in terms of movie watching, believe it or not. I’ve been quite busy at work so I couldn’t go to too many press screenings. I actually declined the press screenings to see The Host, The Croods, and G.I. Joe, but my friend Ted and my hubby did go to see G.I. Joe, in fact, I’ll be posting Ted’s review tomorrow, so stay tuned!

Here are some posts you might’ve missed in March:

Oh and if you missed it, my blog pals Terrence, Keith and I put together a special collaborative list of 10 Redeeming Films we’d recommend. Check it out and add your own pick to the list! Now, as far as movie watching, it’s actually been a pretty good month as I saw about 20 films and TV shows. That’s quite a lot for my standards, usually I can only fit a dozen or so.

New to Me:

Holy Motors

HolyMotors

 Jack The Giant Slayer

JackGiantSlayer

Lawrence of Arabia

LawrenceOfArabia

Olympus Has Fallen

Olympus

Oz The Great & Powerful

Oz

Red Cliff

RedCliff

Stoker

Stoker

The Intouchables

Intouchables

Wreck-It-Ralph

Ralph


Rewatch:

Ben-Hur

BenHur Mrs Brown

MrsBrown

Favorite Movie seen in March:

LawrenceOfArabiaPoster

I finally bought the Blu-ray of Lawrence of Arabia which was practically a steal at only $10 bucks on Amazon!! It’s perhaps one of the best Blu-ray purchases ever as the transfer is so amazingly good. This is the FIRST time I saw Sir David Lean’s masterpiece and though I was a bit puzzled about the story due to my lack of history knowledge, I was floored by this film. I mean, just the visuals alone, all those spectacular long shots in the dessert — not to mention the sublime beauty of Peter O’Toole and Omar Sharif, ehm — it made me regret not seeing this on the big screen when it was re-released last October!!

I just saw the Making Of documentary that’s included in the disc last night, it was so entertaining it made me want to see it again! Well, I’m planning to see it again relatively soon anyway, but not until I read more about the historical background of the subject matter. I think that’d make me appreciate this film even more. I will do an appreciation post at some point, I feel really inadequate to review this right now, but let’s just say, yes I was most definitely impressed. I really think this film has stood the test of time.

..


Well, that’s my March Recap. What’s YOUR favorite movie seen the past month?

Random Question: What movies you wish would get a theatrical re-release?

Hello everyone! Welcome to another collaborative post with my lovely friend Paula G! This time we each came up with five movies we wish we could see on the big screen (either a repeat viewing or for the first time).

Seems like almost every other week nowadays we hear news of previously-released films being shown again on the big screen for one reason or another. Of course Hollywood is all feverish now with the 3D hype so every darn thing is getting the 3D treatment that serves no purpose whatsoever! There’ve been reports that Star Wars, Titanic and The Lion King are all being converted to 3D for a re-release in the near future… apparently both George Lucas and James Cameron are running out of hundred-dollar bills to swim in.

Now, I do think some films are meant to be seen in its big screen glory and obviously there are many we missed out on, either because they’re out before we were born or we simply didn’t get a chance to see ’em during their theatrical run. I’m fine with digital remastering, just save the unnecessary 3D please, thank you very much!

So without further ado, here are our picks starting with …

Paula’s List:

1. Lawrence of Arabia  (1962)
I just saw David Lean’s Bridge On The River Kwai on a big screen here and I noticed a lot of things I’d missed when watching it on TV, so it’s only logical to choose Lawrence of Arabia, with its desert panoramas and perfect compositions. It’s stunning on a small screen and probably only more so when seen at its proper size.

… 

2. Black Narcissus (1947)
One of my favorite films ever, by my favorite directing duo Powell & Pressburger. The radiant colors and intricate settings would look even better larger, and the denouement would be even more tragic. Possibly some of the visual effects might be more noticeably artificial but Jack Cardiff’s cinematography would thrive.


3. Atonement (2007)
Psst…confession time…I’ve never seen all of Atonement. You know the drill…All together now…”It’s in the queue” But I have seen the 5-minute marvel that is the Dunkirk tracking shot and it deeply affects me. I’ve been known to cry. Not seeing this at a proper cinema is one of my biggest movie-viewing regrets.


… 

4. Valhalla Rising (2009)
OK, so, this film doesn’t have much dialogue. It’s about a one-eyed Viking who ends up on a ship headed for the New World. It’s paced slowly. There’s some nasty violence (though there’s way less than you’d think from watching the trailer) and some really weird stuff goes down. BUT Mads Mikkelsen plays the one-eyed Viking, and it is beautifully shot. It has gorgeous scenic vistas, both glowingly warm and gloomy cold. Between the visuals and the sound, it’s almost sensory overload on a small screen. I can only imagine what effect all of this would have on a big screen.


5. Children of Men (2006)
I have never seen this one on any screen. It may well resemble my nightmares too closely for me to ever see it. But what I have seen of it, including this 10-minute tracking shot below is disturbing and incredible. It was nominated for the Editing and Cinematography Academy Awards and it seems like it should have won.


Ruth’s List:

1. Ben-Hur  (1959)
It’s no secret that I love and greatly admire this film. The chariots scene alone is worth the price of admission, but there are lots to marvel in one of the best Hollywood epic ever. I don’t mind that it’s 3.5 hours long, I’ve seen this film multiple times and there’s not a single seen not worth watching.

… 
2. Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981)
Cowboys & Aliens is out tomorrow, and seeing him wearing that Cowboy hat somehow reminds me of his iconic Fedora as Indiana Jones. I was only a toddler when this movie came out so I didn’t see it until perhaps a decade later with my two twin brothers. We all absolutely loved it, and upon several viewing later, it never lost its appeal. Oh how wonderful it’d be to see Indy’s classic adventures on the big screen.

3. The Rocketeer (1991)
Ok, I’m feeling nostalgic again… especially after seeing the Captain America. I actually saw this on the big screen and I remember discussing it in detail with one of my brothers on the way home. Director Joe Johnston certainly knows how to create a stylish yet authentic retro vibe in his movies, the 1930s Hollywood era he created was awesome, complete with Terry O’Quinn as Howard Hughes (way more fitting than Leo was in The Aviator) and Timothy Dalton as an Errol Flynn-like movie star Neville Sinclair. They did show it at El Capitan theater with the cast & crew for their 20th Anniversary celebration last April (per HeroComplex), oh how I wish I could’ve been there!


4. Superman: The Movie (1978)
Christopher Reeve was my first ever movie crush, I think some of your already known that. I was only 4-5 years old when I saw it playing at a local cinema next door back in my home country. It was pure magic and I remember renting Superman I and II so many times from the video store that my uncle finally bought me a copy. This Lois Lane chopper scene with that iconic John Williams score never ever fails to move me. Yes, I did believe a man could fly… in fact, I still do 🙂


5. L.A. Confidential (1997)
I guess I have a penchant for a retro vibe in movies and this noir thriller not only looks good but it’s got one of the best script and ensemble cast ever! It was nominated for 9 Oscars and won 2 (one of them for Best Adapted Screenplay) and I think both Guy Pearce and Russell Crowe each deserved a nod for their performance. It’s such a juicy, multi-layered story full of twists and witty dialog aplenty that would be such a treat to see in a dark theater. I shall dedicate a proper post for this film, perhaps in a couple of months to coincide with its anniversary date of release.



Well, now your turn folks. What movie(s) do YOU wish would get a theatrical re-release? Better yet, share your own top five!