A-Z Favorite Movie Titles Blogathon

FaveMovieTitleBlogathon

I’m a little late to this but I promised Brittani @ Rambling Film I’d do this when I get back from holiday. I can’t possibly missed not participating in her debut blogathon! Here are the rules:

1) Going through the alphabet, list your favorite movie title beginning with each letter.

2) You don’t have to necessarily like the movie to use it’s title.

3) Use the banner at the top of this post in yours.

4) Please have submissions in by Friday, May 30th*.

Now, even though Brittani said I don’t have to like the movie to use its title, my list consist of movies I love, not always a favorite but those I don’t mind seeing more than once. Of course there are a couple of guilty pleasures thrown in. For the purpose of narrowing things down, I’m only including movies from 90s and up. So here goes:

10 Things I Hate About You

Amazing Grace

Belle

Casino Royale

A-ZBlogathon_DieHard

Elizabeth

Four Weddings and A Funeral

Gladiator

How to Train Your Dragon

Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade

Jurassic Park

The King's Speech

Licence To Kill

The Man In The Iron Mask

Nowhere Boy

One Fine Day

Pacific Rim

The Queen

The Rocketeer

Sense & Sensibility

Toy Story

V For Vendetta

A Walk In the Clouds

X-Men 2000

The Young Victoria

A-ZMovies_Unbreakable

A-ZMovies_ZeroDarkThirty


Check out what my fellow bloggers pick for their Favorite Movie Titles here.


So that’s that folks. Are any of your favorites on my list?

ABC’s TOY STORY of TERROR – The only Halloween Special I’m excited for this month

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Wahoo!! My favorite toy gang is back! Can you believe it that it’s been 3 years since TOY STORY 3 was released? Well, that film made my top five of 2010, one of those rare movies that garners a full 5/5 score from moi. Now, I did have a small quibble about that film in that it didn’t have enough Mr. Pricklepants, voiced by, who else, Timothy Dalton of course!

So imagine my thrill when I heard his deep, inimitable voice narrating this spooktastic half-hour special coming to ABC on Wednesday, October 16 at 8 p.m. ET. Of course it’s always fun to see Woody, Buzz and the his riotous team back together again!

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This is the plot per Huffington Post: What starts out as a fun road trip for the “Toy Story” gang takes an unexpected turn for the worse when the trip detours to a roadside motel. After one of the toys goes missing, the others find themselves caught up in a mysterious sequence of events that must be solved before they all suffer the same fate in “Toy Story of TERROR!”

Angus MacLane, one of Pixar’s animators who worked on a bunch of Pixar animations since A Bug’s Life is directing the short feature, and Oscar-winning composer Michael Giacchino who won for UP worked on the score.

Check out the trailer:

I LOVE all the vocal talents here, Tom Hanks as Woody, Tim Allen as Buzz, Joan Cusack as Jessie, Don Rickles as Mr. Potato Head, Wallace Shawn as Rex and Kristen Schaal as Trixie. A while back Tom Hanks described the challenges of voicing Woody on the Graham Norton show. Oh you’ve got to see it for yourself, it’s such a hoot! It shows just how awesome and affable Hanks is, and makes you truly appreciate his — and others’ — voice work in this Pixar masterpiece trilogy.


Related post: Top 10 Favorite Pixar Characters


Can’t wait to see this one. How about you, folks?

Guest Commentary: A thing or two the movie industry can learn from Steve Jobs

Thanks to my beloved hubby Ivan M. (a.k.a. Pixelcrave) for this special contribution.

I love Pixar movies! I have watched every one of them (except for the last one, Cars 2) and can honestly say each one is very much enjoyable to watch. Even the weakest one in my book (Cars) was still a fun experience.

With the recent news about Steve Jobs stepping down from his CEO role at Apple, the focus has mainly been of his “fruit” company and its ubiquitous gadgets that start with a lowercase “i”. But it’s hard to think about Pixar without acknowledging the fact that after all Jobs was the first to recognize its potentials, and made the investment in what would eventually be one of the best contributions to the movie industry.

A lot has been said since the news came about, including a few movies-related articles like this that highlight the “origin” story of Pixar — how Jobs purchased an almost defunct computer graphics division from George Lucas for $10 million, stroke a big distribution deal with Disney, and turned it into an animation powerhouse that has produced twelve feature films, most of which have received critical and financial success.

It’d be a very long post to even try to list all the things that you can learn from Mr. Jobs. But for the purpose of this article, I’d like to focus on only two things that are very much relevant to the movies & entertainment industry.

Quality over quantity

When Jobs returned to Apple in 1996 (after being ousted by his own company 11 years earlier), the company was in a big financial red. Jobs’ first order of business to return to black is by terminating a number of Apple products and only focus on a handful of core products that he believes has the most potentials to succeed.

Jobs applied the same principle to Pixar. He is not as hands-on nor micro-managing in Pixar as he is in Apple, but the one thing he made sure of was for Pixar to focus on quality movies — even if that means not producing as many movies as possible, despite pressure from analysts. Contrast this to how Hollywood studios have been operating, creating sequels after sequels in a ridiculously short period of time, all for the sake of generating profits even if it compromise quality.

“The great thing about Steve is that he knows that great business comes from great product. First you have to get the product right, whether it’s the iPod or an animated movie,” says Peter Schneider, the former chairman of Disney’s studio. In fact, Jobs admitted that Pixar often had to make a difficult decision to halt production of each of its movies, to first fix outstanding issues with a storyline or character. Think about it: there are only 12 Pixar movies since Jobs bought the company 25 years ago! That’s a minuscule number compared to Hollywood’s standard. Yet, the $602 million average gross of its movies is by far the highest of any studio in the industry (per Wikipedia). “I’m as proud of what we don’t do as I am of what we do,” Jobs often says.

Ideas first and foremost

Neither iPod nor iPhone were successful because they were the first in the market. They were successful because they were designed around the idea of simplicity — something that’s not typically associated with hi-tech gadgets. Pixar’s Toy Story was the first feature film that was made entirely with CGI. Yet its technology was not the big idea that eventually skyrocketed the company’s valuation into over $7 billion when Disney acquired it in 2006. Toy Story and other Pixar’s movies that follow simply connect with audiences — whether it’s children, younger/older generations, even people of various cultures. The storyline & strong character development behind every movie are ultimately what drive the company’s success. Talking about the working culture at Apple, Jobs once said in an interview, “you have to be run by ideas, not hierarchy. The best ideas have to win, otherwise good people don’t stay.”

I can only ponder how many movies out there today where the original ideas and vision have been compromised because of pressure from big studios who get the paycheck. It’s no surprise that a lot of the critically-acclaimed movies are coming from smaller, independent studios where ideas and creativity can be nurtured more freely.

Ultimately, the movie industry is as much about making money as any other for-profit business out there — Pixar and Apple not excluded. But what Steve has demonstrated through his two jobs is that he doesn’t compromise creativity and quality for the sole purpose of generating more revenue. For as many good quality movies out there, there are far more money-machine garbage out there that diminish the creative side of the industry.

Here’s hoping more non-compromising creative minds in the industry would share Jobs’ thinking when he says, “quality is more important than quantity. One home run is much better than two doubles.”


So what do you think about Pixar and Steve Jobs in particular? Please share your thoughts in the comments.

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