January 2016 BLIND SPOT: Marie Antoinette (2006)

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I have to confess that since I visited Paris a couple of years ago, I’ve become slightly obsessed with French history. Sofia Coppola‘s retelling of France’s iconic but ill-fated queen promises a character study of the title role instead of a historical account that led to the fall of Versailles. I have no problem with that, after all I’m not expecting a documentary of the subject. If one actually wants to learn more in depth about French history that’s also visually stunning, there’s a good three-part docs called The Rise & Fall of Versailles on Hulu.

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It’s loosely based on the Marie Antoinette biography by Lady Antonia Fraser which reveal the humanity of the French icon. The film opened with the archduchess of Austria at 14, being betrothed to Louis Auguste by her mother Empress Maria Theresa to secure the fragile allegiance between France and Austria. I can only imagine what it must’ve been like for a teenage girl like her to have to part with her family, and her beloved pug, and enter a strange new world on her own. I think the film captured that sense of alienation perfectly, as well as the intense loneliness, not to mention utter bewilderment, of all the new traditions she must quickly become accustomed to. Some of the most amusing scenes pertain to the mystifying traditions at Versailles.

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There’s one where the young queen had to be dressed in front of dozens of courtiers. Given that the most important courtier had to dress her, she literally had to stand shivering in the cold room waiting for someone to finally put clothes on her!

Kirsten Dunst was quite mesmerizing in the title role and being that she was Austrian, I thought she looked the part physically. There’s a playfulness as well as fragility in her performance, and despite being in her early 20s at the time, she looked quite believable as a teen. Jason Schwartzman on the other hand, seems miscast here as Louix XVI. He wasn’t given much to do here either, perhaps that’s purposely done to further the sense of estranged marriage between the two.

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Some critics have said the film is style over substance and there’s certainly style in abundance. The film is lavish and absolutely gorgeous to look at. I have to admit that the first half hour or so I was marveling at the spectacular set pieces and colorful costumes, but the film grew rather tedious and repetitive that it threatened to grind it to a halt. Coppola seems obsessed with the unconsummated marriage that the scenes of Marie being frustrated in bed is played over and over again. I understand Coppola intended to create an unconventional biopic, and that’s to be commended, but it feels overly indulgent. The young queen might’ve been giddy and frivolous, but it doesn’t mean the film depicting her has to be done in the same way.

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“Qu’ils mangent de la brioche,” (Let them eat cake)

As a character study, I feel that Coppola didn’t really go deep enough into the titular heroine. Marie Antoinette is depicted as a friendly, vivacious and sweet, though like most teen, she has a penchant for gossip and spectacular parties. ‘The Party That Started A Revolution’ one of the film tagline says, and well, the queen sure gave some ridiculously opulent parties in a time where the French citizens were starving. Whether she actually uttered the heartless remark ‘let them eat cake’ had been largely disputed, but she did say that line in this film. There’s perhaps a good five minutes or so devoted to the Revolution, there’s not even a mention of the Guillotine anywhere in the film. By the time the crowds had seized Versailles and the royal family escorted to Paris to await their doomed fate, I felt a tremendous sympathy for the characters, but more because of what I’ve learned in history about them, not necessarily due to their depictions here.

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The supporting cast was filled with actors who’ve become quite famous of late, especially Tom Hardy who had basically a cameo here as one of the French aristocrats. The other pretty boy was Jamie Dornan as a French soldier who became Marie Antoinette’s lover Count Axel Fersen. There’s also Rose Byrne as Duchesse de Polignac, the queen’s best friend. Rip Torn played Louis XV here, a role which was apparently offered to French actor Alain Delon, which I think would’ve been perfect. According to IMDb trivia, it has been speculated that Delon did not have confidence in the young American director to do justice to a film on this period of French history.


In any case, the star of this film is definitely Dunst, who carried the film with her charisma. She’s able to convey a variety of emotions throughout and make me sympathize with her despite her obvious flaws. The feeling of total isolation and tremendous pressure of having to produce an heir seemed so unbearable and she conveyed those emotions convincingly.

Technically the movie is a marvel. The cinematography by Lance Acord is simply stunning, a *decadence porn* displaying the most extravagant aristocracy lifestyle in history. I also like the use of contemporary music, as I quite like anachronism in period films when it’s used well. I think Sofia Coppola has been known for having good soundtrack in her movies. This one called Fools Rush In is one of my favorites:


Overall I think Marie Antoinette is a pretty shallow affair, an incomplete and rather unmoving character study that could’ve been much tightly-edited. The film tends to only focus on certain aspects of the character and leave others out, for example the infamous diamond necklace affair that forever tarnished her reputation wasn’t mentioned here. I do think the second half of the film is a bit more interesting as the revolution drew near. I’d still recommend this if you’re into this genre and anything to do with French history. I’d also still applaud Coppola for taking a novel approach to the subject, even if it’s far from being a superior work.

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Check out my full 2016 lineup by clicking the graphic below

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Well, have you seen Marie Antoinette? Well, what did you think?

Everybody’s Chattin, Weekend Roundup + Music Break: The Eagles’ Hotel California

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Happy Tuesday everybody! It’s a short week with the Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday, and thank God we got an extra day off in the coldest weekend of Minnesota Winter. Well I sure hope this is as cold as it gets, with temps reaching double digits BELOW ZERO. We barely made it to zero the past couple of days! But hey, it’s gonna be in the 20s tomorrow, heat wave! 😛

Well, since I haven’t been doing a Weekend Roundup post in a while, I thought I’d share with you what I’ve been watching this weekend…


I’m not going to review Sicario as Ted has already done it here. But here’s my reaction:


I wish I had seen Sicario sooner, it’d surely make my top 10 list! Oh, and Benicio Del Toro was surely robbed of a Best Supporting Actor nomination!

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Stanley in French TV Movie ‘Figaro’ (2008)

Marie Antoinette was pretty interesting but it’s way too s-l-o-w and it felt so repetitive as for a while the film just didn’t go anywhere. It seems that Sofia Coppola is a hit and miss and this is certainly no Lost in Translation. I think I probably enjoyed it a bit more as I’m intrigued by French history but under a different director I think the film would’ve been a much better film.

Kirsten Dunst was surprisingly good in the title role though, and I did like the use of modern music in some of the scenes, but overall the movie is rather meh. Wish Stanley Weber had played Marie’s lover Count Axel Fersen instead of Jamie ‘Christian Grey’ Dornan. Stanley might still be in acting school back in 2006 but heck, I think he could still pull it off, I mean he IS French and quite a seductive one, I might add 😉

No doubt it was bittersweet watching Alan Rickman as Col. Brandon once again in Sense & Sensibility. I had to admit I teared up a bit when he showed up on screen for the first time… I wrote a tribute for him this weekend, I shall miss him dearly. As for 45 Years, it’s such a delicate and beautifully-told story that shows how delicate love truly is. Charlotte Rampling is wonderful, her Oscar nomination is well-deserved.

So about those links…

Keith reviewed 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi. I was as surprised as he was that this wasn’t another crappy Bayhem, I think he did the story justice. (Check out my interview w/ the three soldiers who lived it)

I’ll be participating in Cindy’s Lucky 13 Film Club next month, woo hoo! Check out next month’s topic and hope you’ll participate!

Reviews galore… Steven and Ian reviewed The Revenant, Mike reviewed the indie sci-fi 400 Days, and Vinnie reviewed The Man From U.N.C.L.E. (Speaking of 400 Days, check out my Q&A with the writer/director Matt Osterman)

A couple of awesome music-related lists! Chris picks his top 10 best albums of 2015 and Margaret lists her picks of 10 best film tracks of 2015.

Last but not least, Dan wrote about Tom Hardy winning Best British/Irish Actor of the Year at London Critics’ Circle Award. Woo hoo!! Definitely well-deserved, let’s hope he wins an Oscar too!


Music Break

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This music break is dedicated to Glenn Frey, one of the founding members of The Eagles who just passed away. Yes, another rock royalty has left us… boy it hasn’t been a good start to the new year has it? 😦

I love what the author of this CNN article (who wrote the biographic To the Limit: The Untold Story of the Eagles) said… “The passing of Glenn Frey both recalls and closes the book on one of rock’s most celebrated rock ‘n’ roll songwriting teams, but for many of us it also signals something more personal: the passing of a time when the Eagles’ “Hotel California” was the anthem for the youth of America in the ’70s — the way Beatles music was for the children of the ’60s…[Hotel California] described both the band’s self-destruction by excess, its awareness of that self-destruction and its inability to stop it. (‘You can check out any time, but you can never leave. …’).” 


Hotel California is certainly my favorite from The Eagles, and also one of my favorite songs from the 70s. There’s something so eerie in the poetically-mesmerizing lyrics that always hypnotized me every time that song came on the radio. It also has a cinematic quality in that I somehow visualize the song every time I heard it.

Rest in peace, Mr. Frey.

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Hope you enjoyed today’s music break!

Weekend Roundup: The Americans (FX series) and The Bling Ring reviews

Happy Weekend everybody! WOW, everything’s still very much awesome for The LEGO Movie, winning box office for the third straight weekend with $31 mil. It’s now made $183 mil domestically, and with a production budget on only $60 mil, that’s quite a huge hit for Warner Bros. The McG/Luc Besson’s spy thriller 3 Days to Kill (review coming later this week) is a distant second with $12 mil but with a low production budget of $28 mil, I’d think they’d still turn a profit. Pompeii on the other hand, lives up to its subject matter, being a major box office disaster as it only made a measly 10% of its $100 mil budget, ouch!

It’s home cinema this weekend for me, catching up on some older films and TV series I’ve been meaning to check out. Here are my thoughts:

The Americans (FX series)

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Two Soviet intelligence agents pose as a married couple to spy on the American government.

A few people have mentioned about this show, but finally my hubby and I had a chance to check out the pilot last Friday. We’re definitely gonna try to catch up with Season 1 as there are only 13 episodes.

I thought the concept of having two Russian protagonists in an American show is very intriguing. It certainly offers a fresh twist to an otherwise run-of-the-mill spy show. It’s set in the 80s during the Reagan-era Cold War, and according to IMDb, the show is based on a true story that broke in 2010 of Russian sleeper agents hiding in plain sites in the US for decades. So just like in the series, their children, coworkers, friends, and neighbors had no idea they were spies.

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Having just seen Austenland, it’s quite a change to see Keri Russell as a bad ass spy here, in the opening sequence she’s dressed like a hooker seducing an FBI agent. Welsh actor Matthew Rhys, with impeccable American accent, plays her *husband* aka spy partner. Both are excellent in the role of married couple Elizabeth & Phillip Jennings, who look like a typical suburban DC couple with a couple of kids posing as travel agents. The pilot presents quite a dilemma for the couple when their assignment involves kidnapping a defecting KGB agent whom Elizabeth had a personal vendetta. Their loyalties to Mother Russia is tested as the Jennings don’t always share the same feelings about their job. Of course things are about to get even more interesting when one of the FBI agent hot on the trail of the kidnapping suspects move in to their neighborhood! A strange twist of coincidence or is there more to it than that?? Well, I can’t wait to find out! Nice to see Noah Emmerich as FBI agent Stan Beeman, he’s one of those character actors I’m always impressed with every time I see him in a movie or TV series.

I think the most riveting of all is how the American audience are no doubt compelled to perceive the “enemy” of the states in a whole new light. I definitely sympathize with them more than I probably should. But really, are they really so different from our own agents working in a foreign country? The sharp script keeps me engrossed and in suspense. I love that this spy series is not about the cool action and gadget you’ll find in escapist fun like James Bond, but it’s more in the vein of Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy that explores the tricky adventure of espionage and really get into the intricate psyche of a secret agent.

I refrain from giving a rating at this point as I’ve only seen the pilot. But I highly recommend this one if you’re a fan of the spy genre or if you’re looking for a quality show to get hooked to.

Now switching gear to Sofia Coppola’s latest effort from last year. 

The Bling Ring (2013)

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At first glance I really wasn’t all that enthused to watch this film. I mean I couldn’t be more disinterested in seeing materialistic and fame-obsessed teenagers robbing their favorite celebrities. I find the whole TMZ culture so loathsome, I don’t even care to read US magazine anymore even when I’m at the salon. It’s interesting why Coppola choose to do a film on them, but perhaps there’s some kind of message she’s trying to tell us with this story. Well, unfortunately this film is as shallow as protagonists depicted here.

The film basically shows us how these teens, led by its ringleader Rebecca (Katie Chang) and her new BFF Marc (Israel Broussard), rob one celebrity’s house after another. They’re mostly C-list celebs who are more famous for their shenanigans (Lindsay Lohan, Paris Hilton) or those famous for being in the fashion mags instead of actual work (Audrina Patridge, Rachel Bilson). So apparently none of these celebs have heard of home security as even Hilton’s mansion was so easy to break into, in fact, the group barely had to break anything to access their homes. I don’t know what is more repulsive than witnessing these kids stealing things left and right or seeing the excessive decadence on display.

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I have to admit I wasn’t as bored out of my wits watching this as I did watching her last film Somewhere, but I felt that even that movie perhaps had a bit more depth as at the very least Coppola tried to present some kind of redeeming quality for the disenchanted Hollywood actor. In this film, the characters only pass through time, living their incredibly shallow life in succession, simply motivated by the grand hedonistic lifestyle and self-indulgence. It’s stylishly shot but everything is so detached. Despite a few engaging and hilarious moments in a self-parody kind of way, I struggle to find a meaning – if any – that Coppola is trying to say here.

The only saving grace here seems to be Emma Watson, simply because it’s amusing to see her portray someone so different from Hermione Granger in Harry Potter. Her American accent is spot on and she certainly has the gift of comedy. It’s amusing to think that the young actress is surely as wealthy – if not more – as the victims that her character rob in this movie! But even she could barely save this vapid drivel. Even though it’s only 90-min long, it felt pretty tedious by the repetitive stealing-and-partying scenes displayed over and over. It’s darn near impossible to sympathize with any of the characters the way Coppola depicted them here. I think Marc was perhaps the most sympathetic character in the film as he seems to be the only one who has the slightest bit of remorse. But really, that’s not saying much.

This is the third film by Sofia Coppola I saw, but so far my favorite is by far still Lost in Translation. I might give her other earlier films a try, hopefully The Virgin Suicides and Marie Antoinette fare much better than this one.

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So what did you watch this weekend? Thoughts on The Americans series and/or The Bling Ring? 

Spotlight on Bill Murray & my Top Five Favorite Roles

BillMurrayBday It was Bill Murray‘s birthday this past Saturday, he turned 63. I know it’s a bit late but I can’t resist making a tribute to the comedian whose practically a legend. I’ve always been a big fan of the Illinois native, he’s perhaps my favorite SNL-grad (he’s one of the original members) who’s made it big in Hollywood. Murray’s one of those comedians who’s just naturally funny. His deadpan expression alone is just hilarious, which he certainly puts to good use in various roles that have achieved cult status over the years. He’s apparently not just quirky in his roles, but Mr. Murray seems to be just as amusing in real life. You’ve got to check out this awesome infographic that I found on HuffingtonPost site Click the larger image to view the entire thing.

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There’s also a site aptly called BillMurrayStory.com… with a tagline ‘no one would ever believe you‘ 😀 Very few actors have become a cultural phenomenon of sort. I remember reading how people all over the states were making banners to invite Mr. Murray to their parties as he’s been known as a party crasher! Now, before I posted clips of my favorite roles from the 6’2″ actor, here are some interesting trivia that you might not know about (thanks to IMDb):

BillMurrayLostInTranslationSofia Coppola wrote the lead role of Bob Harris in Lost in Translation (2003), with Murray specifically in mind. She did not know the actor and even enlisted the help of her famous father, Francis Ford Coppola, to track down the sometimes quite elusive Murray. Once he finally read the script, though, he agreed to do it on the spot. Murray and Sofia Coppola are now good friends.

He has rubbed some collaborators the wrong way because he has a tendency to re-write and improvise his way through scripts until many of his scenes barely resembles the original versions. Most collaborators ultimately find, though, it’s to the improvement of the films.

Has no agent, no business manager, or favorite hair and make-up artist. He travels without an entourage.

Was considered for the role of Batman/Bruce Wayne in the 1989 Batman film when it was set to be identical to the 1960s TV Series before Tim Burton came along. He’s also considered for the role of Han Solo in Star Wars (1977).

Turned down Steve Carell’s role in Little Miss Sunshine (2006), which became one of the few choices in his career that he regretted.

Was considered and tested for the voice role of Sulley in Monsters, Inc. (2001), but the director, Pete Docter, said that when the filmmakers decided to offer it to Murray, they were unable to make contact with him and took that to mean “no”.

Was a frequent collaborator with Harold Ramis throughout the 1980s, but their working relationship ended during the filming of Groundhog Day (1993) due to differing views on what the film should be: Ramis claims that Murray wanted the film to be more philosophical, while Ramis himself simply meant for it to be a comedy. Ramis also cites that Murray’s personal problems at the time (namely the ending of his first marriage) had a negative effect on his work ethic, causing him to be uncharacteristically harsh during filming, as another reason for the end of their working relationship.

Appeared in Zombieland (2009) as a favor to Woody Harrelson, movie co-star and big “Bill Murray” fan.

Now, I can’t really remember when I first saw Bill Murray. Most likely it’s in Ghostbusters (1984) as my brothers were a big fan of that movie. I still need to see a lot more of his films, especially the two by Wes Anderson that I missed out on: Rushmore and The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou. But out of about a dozen roles, here are five of my favorites (in alphabetical order):

BROKEN FLOWERS

This is the only film by Jim Jarmusch I saw so far. Murray plays a womanizer who received an anonymous letter from a former lover informing him that he has a son who may be looking for him. This is kind of a road film of sort following his journey to visit his old flames. The female cast is pretty awesome here, esp. Jessica Lange, Sharon Stone and Tilda Swinton. Murray’s performance is quite restrained here and more reflective, but his deadpan mannerism is perfect for the role of Don Johnston who’ve lived his life on auto pilot. This scene with Lange and her cat is particularly amusing. http://youtu.be/kRg5-TIF9LQ

GHOSTBUSTERS

You can’t talk about Bill Murray’s career and not mention his early iconic role. I saw this years ago as a kid but his role with fellow SNL cast member Dan Aykroyd is always fun to watch. Murray plays a lovable wiseguy like nobody’s business and Peter Venkman got the best lines in this Ivan Reitman’s comedy classic.

GROUNDHOG DAY

This is one of his films that never seem to get old! As someone who’s made a career out of sarcastic and insolent antiheroes, his performance as Phil Connors is downright iconic. His dry ironic humor is full on as the frustrated weather who find himself living the same day over and over. It’s absolutely hilarious but at the same time, the poignant and philosophical aspect makes this a compelling watch worth revisiting year after year. This is one of my favorite scenes ever! http://youtu.be/6VF5P7qLaEQ

LARGER THAN LIFE

The premise of this movie, about a guy who inherits a circus elephant, lends itself to hilarity. Bill Murray manages not to be upstaged by the adorable Vera the elephant. The funniest parts are when Murray’s character Jack and Vera hit the road in order to deliver the elephant to a San Diego zoo. Along the way, they encounter a psychotic truck driver, played by an unhinged Matthew McConnaughey in perhaps his best comedic role he’s ever done. The scene at the truck stop alone is worth a watch! http://youtu.be/XVV18VB9cFo

LOST IN TRANSLATION

I think if I could only name one BEST Bill Murray performance, I’d have to say this one. I mean there are some truly hilarious scenes but there’s a layer of vulnerability that he captured as the faded movie star Bob Harris that’s just as compelling to watch. His tentative relationship with a young woman who’s disillusioned with her new marriage is wonderfully written. I always say this is my favorite role of Scarlett Johansson as well. Seems that this film isn’t for everyone though. I actually recommended this film to a couple friends who didn’t find it enjoyable nor funny. For me though, the two scenes below at the photoshoot and in his hotel room with a Japanese female escort had me in stitches! I can’t imagine anyone else playing this role. http://youtu.be/gXGXZiX0pCA http://youtu.be/lPQ6VQzuyxU

HONORABLE MENTIONS

  • The Royal Tennenbaums
  • The Fantastic Mr. Fox
  • Moonrise Kingdom


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So what’s YOUR favorite Bill Murray role(s)?

Weekend Roundup: Somewhere and Super 8

You can call it the ‘Elle Fanning movie weekend’ 😀 I had never seen her in anything, and suddenly within one weekend, I saw two movies starring Dakota’s 13-year-old little sister. I didn’t think I’d have time to see two movies this weekend given how busy things got, but we had to watch Somewhere as we actually got it last weekend from Netflix! I really should’ve just returned it when we couldn’t watch it last week 😦

Somewhere (2010)

I think the more fitting title for this is Nowhere. The fourth feature film from Sofia Coppola promises much but delivers little. The movie centers on a 30-something Hollywood star Johnny Marco who seemingly has everything a man could want: girls, money, fast cars, etc. I mean the guy lives at the Chateau Marmont Hotel for crying out loud. But despite his fame and fortune, he is disillusioned with his career, it’s not until his young daughter’s visit that he’s compelled to rethink what he’s done with his life.

Coppola illustrates Johnny’s boredom over and over again in almost mind-numbing repetition, just like the intro with Johnny driving his black Ferrari as fast as he could in a loop five times before he finally stops and still bored out of his wits. He falls asleep watching two blond twins pole-dancing in his hotel room, and he even dozes off right in the middle of sex!

The reason I rented this is because I like Lost in Translation, though it’s quite a polarizing film as I know a few of my friends hated it. So I came in with a moderate expectation that I’d at least appreciate it even if I may not thoroughly enjoy it. Boy, was I wrong. Stephen Dorff ain’t no Bill Murray, whose screen charisma can lift and spice up Coppola’s low key, almost lethargic style. There’s nothing wrong with being minimalistic if the director can tackle it properly, but I don’t think this movie has a compelling story — nor performance — to justify it. Speaking of minimalistic, not only is there no editor in this movie, there don’t seem to be a hairstylist either judging from Dorff’s hairstyle (or lack thereof).

Speaking of performances, Stephen Dorff looks believably weary and lonely, but I don’t really buy him as this big movie star. I mean, yes I get it that he’s desensitized to life’s pleasures, hence his bored look throughout the film, but I’d think he’d at least appear charismatic in front of the public so we see the duality of his persona. But no, there’s none of that movie star’s charm present at all, whether he’s in Hollywood, Italy or whatever.

Elle Fanning on the other hand, is quite memorable as Johnny’s 11-year-old daughter. But the series of activities they spend together fail to really engage not because of lack of chemistry, but because Coppola’s lack of direction. As for the denouement, well, there really isn’t one… and boy do I feel cheated as I really was expecting a big payoff to make the whole thing worthwhile!

It really leaves me scratching my head how in the world does this movie win the Golden Lion award at Venice Film Festival… is it because she’s a Coppola?? My friend Ted tweeted me saying that perhaps Sofia is a one-hit wonder? Well, I haven’t seen her two other movies yet, but I don’t think I care to find out.

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Super 8 (2011)

I put this as one of my anticipated films this year for pure nostalgia reasons. The trailer reminded me a lot of Steven Spielberg’s ET which was such a timeless tearjerker. This time, Spielberg served as producer with J.J. Abrams at the helm based on his own script. The result? Super 8 is pretty much ET/The Goonies meets Cloverfield (at least judging by the trailers as I haven’t seen that movie).

Kids often get top billing in Spielberg’s movies, and this time it’s no different. Set in the Summer of 1979, a group of Junior High friends witness a mysterious train crash right in the middle of shooting a film with their Super 8 camera. That massive accident sets off a myriad of strange happenings that rock their idyllic small town that prompt the kids to investigate the freaky phenomenon.

Abrams took some time to get us invested in the characters before the main event arrives. Joe Lamb has just lost his mother four months prior and his detached dad Jackson wants him to attend camp for the Summer. But Joe would rather help his friend Charles make his zombie thriller movie for a film festival. The friendship between these kids feels natural and engaging, and once again Elle Fanning makes an impression as Alice, the object of Joe and Charles’ affection. It’s right in the middle of an important emotional scene with Alice when suddenly a car drives onto the track as the train approaches, and kaboom!! The train crash itself is nothing short of spectacular, and Abrams did a good job in keeping us in suspense as to what that creature is on board the train.

The movie works on many levels, for sure it’s technically proficient. The retro look and feel of the movie really takes you back in time, and the special effects enhances the story instead of overwhelming it. The acting is notable, especially the young ‘uns 15-year-old Joel Courtney and 13-year-old Fanning who are the heart of the film. Kyle Chandler is good though he generally relegated to second banana status and wasn’t really given much to do. Joe’s friends are quite an entertaining bunch, though they’re too foul-mouthed for my liking.

The third act get to be too much though, I had just read this insightful commentary on Castor’s blog about the ‘more’ philosophy of JJ Abrams. It sure seems like Abrams likes to ‘pile on the peril’ as I call it, not to mention those pesky lens flares, he’s definitely obsessed with them! There are giant loopholes in the plot as big as the monster in question, but in the end it doesn’t derail the movie. Perhaps I’m more forgiving on that front because I feel the ending is quite satisfying. It has the earnestness and warm, fuzzy feeling that’d probably turn off cynical moviegoers, but I kind of expect that considering this is a throwback to Spielberg’s classics. It’s also worth staying for the end credits, man these kids are really talented, Charles is basically a young Spielberg in the making.

I don’t think the re-watchability factor is all that great though. I’d rather watch Abrams’ previous movie Star Trek several times over than seeing this again. But I’d say it’s worth seeing in the cinema, especially if you’re a big fan of Spielberg and Abrams’ work.

Three and a half stars out of Five
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So what movie(s) did you watch this weekend? If you have seen either one of these, do let me know what you think in the comments.