FlixChatter Review: THE DIG (2021)

When I first saw the trailer for The Dig, I was immediately intrigued as I love historical drama, even if it I’m not familiar with the Sutton Hoo excavation of 1939 that shed light into the early Anglo-Saxon period. The film begins with archaeologist Basil Brown (Ralph Fiennes, sporting a Suffolk accent) visits the home of Edith Pretty (Carey Mulligan), who has been curious about what’s underneath eighteen ancient mounds on her Sutton Hoo estate. Though Brown is considered an amateur archeologist, he’s been working as a paid excavation employee for a provincial museum and has experience uncovering Roman remains.

It’s not clear how long the process took for Basil to discover that something really important has been buried under the ancient mounds for centuries, but it doesn’t seem to have taken him a long time. It’s remarkable given he’s only got two young guys helping him out. The discovery reminds me a bit of when archeologists found the skeletons of Richard III in 2012 under a Leicester parking lot of all places! Now I thought they’d make a film of that by now. Well, the the Plantagenet king’s reign in the late 1400s seems relatively modern compared to the 7th-century Anglo-Saxon ship burial, a period that lacks historical documentation.

Now, the story of excavation itself is pretty simple and perhaps would’ve been better served as a documentary. Filmmaker Simon Stone and screenwriter Moira Buffini based the film out of John Preston’s 2007 novel of the same name and focused on the characters affected by the dig, as much as the excavation project itself. If you’re expecting plenty of action scenes a la Indiana Jones however, well you won’t find much here. In fact, the film moves at an un-hurried yet assured pace.

Like many British period dramas, this film also deals with social class system as well as romance, though handled in a pretty subtle way here. Even though Brown was the one who made the discovery, the professional archaeologists promptly take over the project and he was practically cast aside. He almost quit entirely if it wasn’t for Edith’s young son Robert (Archie Barnes). Interestingly, the two main characters were also seemingly taken over by the new group of characters working on the dig: Charles Phillips (Ken Stott), husband + wife archeological team Stuart (Ben Chaplin) + Peggy (Lily James) and Edith’s cousin Rory (Johnny Flynn). I have to say it was quite distracting at first seeing Chaplin and James as a married couple, given they played father/daughter in Cinderella.

There’s not one but two tentative romance the film tread on. Though there are interesting societal themes being presented here, specifically in the relationship between Stuart and Peggy, it’s all a bit undercooked. I feel like the filmmakers aren’t as invested in them as they are in Edith and Basil’s story. As Edith’s health quickly deteriorates, I can’t help but wishing she’d get a last chance at happiness after being a widow for so long. But ultimately, it’s the blooming friendship and affecting mother-son relationship that brings a sense of joy and hope. Both Fiennes and Mulligan are two of the finest actors working today and they convincingly embody the characters they’re playing. It’s a restrained but effective performance depicting the slow-burn nature of their relationship. I don’t think I’ve ever seen the usually buttoned-up Fiennes so muddy and disheveled, but he’s one of those actors who can disappear into any roles. Young newcomer Archie Barnes is wonderful to watch and provides some of the most emotional scenes of the film.

One thing I noticed about the film’s editor deliberately separates the dialog from the scenes of actors conversing with one another. At first it seemed like an odd technique but it actually adds unexpected dynamic to an otherwise ordinary, even tedious scenes. The filmmaker’s authentic depiction the Suffolk climate and the damp pastoral landscape of the excavation pretty well. It’s as if you can feel the mud, dirt and even smell the sodden grass, which really transport you to that time. The expansive cinematography by Mike Eley showcases the English pastoral countryside beautifully.

Now, one criticism I have is that despite the dig being regarded as one of the most important archaeological discoveries of all time, the film lacks a real genuine suspense nor even excitement overall. There’s also not a strong payoff in the end, other than the text explaining what’s become of the discovery and the people involved. Now, I personally enjoy gentle, slow-paced period pieces, those that some might call ‘painfully polite’ dramas, but I think some might find this movie a bit dull. For those who have the patience, I think there are quite a few gems to appreciate here, and the fascinating historical significance also compels me to read more about Sutton Hoo excavation.

Have you seen THE DIG? Well, what did you think?

Netflix FIRST LOOK: The Dig + Lupin (French series) – coming in January

We have twenty four days left in December and yet I’m already looking to January. Yes I know we still have a few things to look forward to in December, namely Wonder Woman and The Midnight Sky (directed by & starring George Clooney), but seeing these two trailer this past week got me excited to jump to what’s normally considered the dump season for movie releases.

THE DIG

It’s been a while since I saw Carey Mulligan in anything, and she’ll have two movies back to back. Her revenge thriller Promising Young Woman is going to be released in theaters on Christmas Day, and this historical drama will be released on Netflix on January 29, 2021.

As WWII looms, a wealthy widow (Carey Mulligan) hires an amateur archaeologist (Ralph Fiennes) to excavate the burial mounds on her estate. When they make a historic discovery, the echoes of Britain’s past resonate in the face of its uncertain future‎.

Per IMDb, THE DIG reimagines the events of the 1939 excavation of Sutton Hoo near Woodbridge, in Suffolk, England. It is the site of two early medieval cemeteries that date from the 6th to 7th centuries. One cemetery had an undisturbed ship burial with a wealth of Anglo-Saxon artifacts. Most of these objects are now held by the British Museum.

I LOVE the cast and those who know me knows this is SO my kind of movie. I love movies set in Britain and the fact that it’s based on a true story makes it even more intriguing. I’m not familiar with the director Simon Stone‘s work, but I have enjoyed the screenwriter Moira Buffini‘s work (Byzantium, Jane Eyre, Viceroy’s House). The pairing of Mulligan and Fiennes is a huge appeal for me, both are such terrific actors. Originally Nicole Kidman was going to play Edith Pretty, the woman on whose land they discovered the ship burial, but I’m glad Mulligan was cast instead. Lily James (who seems to be in a lot of Netflix movies lately), plus the suddenly-everywhere Johnny Flynn are in this.


LUPIN

I love a fun heist flick and this one is a contemporary retelling of the classic French story about Arsène Lupin, a gentleman thief and master of disguise.

TV series based on the early 20th century French detective novels by Maurice Leblanc about a gentleman thief named Arsene Lupin.

 

I love Omar Sy in The Intouchables, glad to see him in a leading role in what promises to be a lot of fun action set in the City of Light. Here he plays Assane Diop which is inspired by the fictitious gentleman thief Arsène Lupin created in 1905 by French writer Maurice Leblanc. He’s looking pretty cool and suave, like a French Idris Elba–mais oui! The first trailer I saw was a dubbed version and I’m REALLY hoping Netflix would air the original French version with subtitles (we can read Netflix, come on!!) There’s nothing more annoying than watching dubbed movies/series, I mean, you lost a lot of the language nuances of the original.

In any case, the show’s creator is George Kay, who’s written for a bunch of terrific UK shows such as The Hour, The Tunnel, Killing Eve, Criminal, etc. The character itself is popular in Japanese Manga called Arsène Lupin III which is the grandson of Leblanc’s fictitious creation.

The rest of the French cast include Hervé PierreNicole GarciaClotilde HesmeLudivine SagnierAntoine GouyShirine Boutella and Soufiane Guerrab. The director of the first episode is Louis Leterrier, which some cinephiles might remember for directing The Transporter and The Incredible Hulk.

Given the lockdown is likely to continue indefinitely until we get those Covid vaccines that prevent us from traveling the world, I’m going to live vicariously through movies/series set in European cities. I know I’ll be craving to go to Paris even more after watching this one.

LUPIN will premiere on January 8 on Netflix.


Can’t wait for these two! What about you?

Thursday Movie Picks: BOOKISH films

ThursdayMoviePicksHappy almost Friday everyone! I’m a bit late to the TMP party but I love this week’s topic that I still want to participate. The Thursday Movie Picks blogathon was spearheaded by Wandering Through the Shelves Blog.

The rules are simple simple: Each week there is a topic for you to create a list of three movies. Your picks can either be favourites/best, worst, hidden gems, or if you’re up to it one of each. This Thursday’s theme is… BOOKISH movies.

I haven’t been able to participate on TMP lately but when I saw today’s topic I knew I had to take part! I guess this topic could be about movies based on books, but I see it as movies where books/literature play a central role or that the main characters love reading, so I’m going with that… and I’m choosing films set in England (because one day I’d love to shoot my feature film there!) Plus,  I have been reading quite a bit lately and I do LOVE movies about books!

In any case, here are my three picks:

The Bookshop (2017)

England 1959. In a small East Anglian town, Florence Green decides, against polite but ruthless local opposition, to open a bookshop.

Books can be a great way to escape your mundane every day life or a way to cope with a traumatizing event. In this movie, the protagonist Florence (Emily Mortimer) copes with the loss of her husband through books and decided to open a bookshop in her town, which somehow ends up facing fierce opposition from powerful local elites.

It’s a rather slow film but I quite enjoy the reflective nature and you truly feel the pain Florence is going through. The scenes when at the bookshop really makes me sad that there aren’t that many brick + mortar book stores anymore.


The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society (2018)

In the aftermath of World War II, a writer forms an unexpected bond with the residents of Guernsey Island when she decides to write a book about their experiences during the war.

Matthew Goode as Juliet’s publisher + Lily James as Juliet

I have just rewatched this movie recently and it makes me wish I could visit Guernsey, an island in the English Channel off the coast of Normandy. The protagonist Juliet Ashton (Lily James) is a London-based writer who, upon receiving a letter from the The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society (yep, that’s the name of the book club!), she decided to pay write a book about them and their experiences during the Nazi occupation.

I love that the film has a bit of investigative aspects as Juliet delved deeper into the lives of the book club’s members. Of course the book idea wasn’t exactly received warmly initially, and you get to figure out why that’s so. There’s of course a sweet romance between Juliet and Dawsey Adams (Michiel Huisman), the one who wrote to her in the first place.


Pride and Prejudice (2005)

Sparks fly when spirited Elizabeth Bennet meets single, rich, and proud Mr. Darcy. But Mr. Darcy reluctantly finds himself falling in love with a woman beneath his class. Can each overcome their own pride and prejudice?

Well, as a fan of Jane Austen, naturally I’d have to include a movie based on her books. But I chose Pride and Prejudice as the protagonist Elizabeth Bennet LOVES reading and there are scenes of her reading even as she’s walking about, not a care in the world as she’s so engrossed in the pages of her book. It makes me like her instantly and it’s a great way to distinguish her from her sisters… that she’d rather be lost in a good story than be bothered about ‘silly’ things like boys. That is of course until she meets Mr. Darcy.

I love that Lizzie’s first comment as she meets Mr. Bingley speaks about how much she loves reading…

The library at Netherfield, I’ve heard, is one of the finest in the country.

Now, Bingley’s own sister pretends to love reading when she said “I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library,” but she only said that to attract Mr. Darcy’s attentions.


What do you think of my picks? Have you seen any of them?

Netflix FIRST LOOK: The Devil All the Time + Rebecca – coming this Fall

Well, it seems streaming content is in our future for a long, long time. If this THR article is to go by, this pandemic isn’t slowing the streaming giant at all. In fact, Netflix continues to spend a gazillion dollars for original films/shows. Well I ain’t complaining!! I’m grateful that my home cinema setup makes it enjoyable for me to watch movies at home.

Here are two I just read about in the past couple of days, both happens to be gothic thrillers, got me super excited! So fall movie seasons isn’t going to be too bleak after all.

THE DEVIL ALL THE TIME

Adapted from the novel by Donald Ray Pollock, the screenplay of this Southern gothic thriller is written by director Antonio Campos (Christine) and his brother Paulo Campos.

In Knockemstiff, Ohio and its neighboring backwoods, sinister characters—an unholy preacher (Robert Pattinson), twisted couple (Jason Clarke and Riley Keough), and crooked sheriff (Sebastian Stan)—converge around young Arvin Russell (Tom Holland) as he fights the evil forces that threaten him and his family. Spanning the time between World War II and the Vietnam war, director Antonio Campos’ ‘The Devil All the Time’ renders a seductive and horrific landscape that pits the just against the corrupted.

Now, I’m not typically into horror movies, but man, check out THIS cast!

  • Robert Pattinson
  • Tom Holland
  • Sebastian Stan
  • Bill Skarsgard
  • Riley Keough
  • Jason Clarke
  • Haley Bennett
  • Mia Wasikowska

Now check out the trailer!

Interesting to point out that even though the story is set in Knockemstiff, Ohio, most of the cast are not from the States. Riley Keough is the only American actor here, the rest are English, Australian, Swedish and Romanian descent. Fun seeing Batman-to-be Pattinson as a crooked Southern preacher, ahah, and hey, Spidey is pointing a gun at him 😀

This trailer promises something truly disturbing. I’m not a horror fan but I’m curious to check this one out. Fortunately it’s on Netflix so I can just turn it off it it gets to be way too scary for me, without worrying about making my money worth for the rental fee!

While the movie is set in Ohio and West Virginia, it was actually shot in Alabama. Per EW, Campos said “It was a challenging shoot just because there were so many locations and we were really spread out over a large portion of northern Alabama… The nice thing is Alabama hasn’t been filmed in very often, so it’s not as recognizable as some other places that have been filmed in and photographed thoroughly by various films and TV shows.”

Tom Holland and Robert Pattinson have previously worked together on The Lost City of Z, in supporting roles. It’ll be nice to see them team up again, and now Holland is a legitimate movie star since playing Spider-man. Oh, and speaking of Marvel superhero, initially Chris Evans was to portray Sheriff Lee Bodecker, but was replaced by his bff Bucky, er Sebastian Stan in the role.

The movie is scheduled to hit Netflix on Wednesday, September 16th, 2020.


REBECCA

Now this one is something many people should be familiar with, especially if they’re into Hitchcock classics. The most famous adaptation of the 1938 Daphne du Maurier’s novel of the same name starred Laurence Olivier and Joan Fontaine in 1940.

After a whirlwind romance in Monte Carlo with handsome widower Maxim de Winter (Armie Hammer), a newly married young woman (Lily James) arrives at Manderley, her new husband’s imposing family estate on a windswept English coast. Naive and inexperienced, she begins to settle into the trappings of her new life, but finds herself battling the shadow of Maxim’s first wife, the elegant and urbane Rebecca, whose haunting legacy is kept alive by Manderley’s sinister housekeeper Mrs. Danvers (Kristin Scott Thomas).

I also LOVE the cast on this one…

  • Lily James
  • Armie Hammer
  • Kristin Scott Thomas
  • Keeley Hawes
  • Sam Riley

Armie and Lily are such an intriguing pairing and Kristin Scott Thomas as Mrs. Danvers is just brilliant! Based on this Daily Mirror article, Kristin’s so believable in the role that she terrified her co-star. I’m a huge fan of Sam Riley too, always glad to see him in any role!

The article also mentions how the Manderley house is a character in itself, as it should be! It’s got Oscar-nominated production designer Sarah Greenwood who did Atonement which also has a memorable English estate in it. I’m curious to see Ben Wheatley in this, as he’s someone mostly known for his shoot-em-up action flicks like Kill List and Free Fire.

We now have a trailer!

Reportedly REBECCA will premiere on October 21 on Netflix.


Can’t wait for these two! What about you?

FlixChatter Review: YESTERDAY (2019)

I love The Beatles. In fact, my record collection (to quote Twin Cities label legend Peter Jesperson) begins with The Beatles and then goes from A-Z. During a company outing I struck up the subject by asking my coworkers: “You guys like The Beatles?” Their answer: “Who doesn’t like The Beatles?” And indeed, with Danny Boyle’s latest film, this assumption is rendered universal which is one of the key factors in making the premise of “Yesterday” work its magic.

Himesh Patel plays Jack Malik, a fledgling singer-songwriter, who despite his dedication and commitment to his trade just doesn’t seem to have the ‘thing’ to make it in the music industry. Gig after gig, from coffee house to festival circuit, no one seems to want to give his songs a listen. All except for one: local schoolteacher Elle (Lily James), his manager and childhood friend. She believes in his songs and most significantly, in him. After a failed gig at a music festival, Jack decides to hang it up. While riding home on his bike, suddenly the world changes. Inexplicably, in this world The Beatles never existed. No one remembers them, except for Malik of course. Armed with these songs, he is now in quite a predicament – or opportunity: What to do? A catalog full of Lennon-McCartney classics to be owned for the taking; to share them to the world or to pass them off as his own?

Patel is excellent as Malik, portraying him with sincerity and humor. Patel is also convincing as a musician, playing and singing with his own voice which is quite good given the awesome repertoire he’s been given. Lily James is simply radiant as Elle and acts as a great foil to Malik once his Hero’s Journey takes an uncontrollable turn. She is the down-to-earth element in his skyward trajectory to fame and fortune. But will he realize it in time before it’s too late?

The other stars in Yesterday are obviously the songs of Lennon-McCartney. The film assumes that we are familiar with them enough to get the in-jokes and album references. Being a Beatles fan myself, they are overly obvious and simplistic but quite satisfying. Admittedly, it’s a fantasy that friends and I have imagined in our younger years as we obsessed about The Beatles and endlessly played them on our aging turntables.

It’s a simple story, a fantasy/romantic comedy that asks us to escape to another dimension where The Beatles never existed. But I can’t help but think how the world would be so much different without The Beatles. Steve Jobs named his company Apple after the group’s record label. Would Ed Sheeran, who has a bit role playing himself, even exist in such a world? Part of the Rolling Stones success was its friendly rivalry with the fab four, yet they exist in this world as if it didn’t matter. Would the masses really have taken to the songs so quickly in such an environment, even with the help of social media technologies like YouTube and twitter? In my view, The Beatles were that influential to the state of contemporary culture since the 60s. Musicologists would probably correct me for these statement but the bottom line is that Yesterday asks us not to think too hard about those details but just to climb on board and enjoy the ride.

Filled with humor, amusing pop culture references, great songs and strong performances from the two leads, Yesterday is highly entertaining as long as we don’t think about it to too much. And by the way, part of The Beatles charm was their happy-go-lucky and not-so-serious nature (at least in the beginning). Wouldn’t it be nice to live in the surreal, joyous world that is portrayed by Richard Lester’s A Hard Day’s Night? With Yesterday, Danny Boyle gives us 2 hours to forget the world’s troubles and ask ourselves “What if?”

Vince_review


So did you get to see YESTERDAY? Let us know what you think!

FlixChatter Review: The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society (2018)


When this movie came across my screen as I fired up Netflix, I knew this is the kind of movie I’d enjoy. Billed as a ‘celebration of literature, love, and the power of the human spirit,’ it’s a charming film set in an English island during WWII. It certainly helps that I’m an Anglophile and British period dramas are my cup of tea, plus this is based on a historical novel written by two women, Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows.

I adore Lily James since Cinderella, Pride & Prejudice & Zombies and Mamma Mia: Here We Go Again. She’s an instantly-likable actress and it’s easy to warm up to her character, Juliet Ashton a young London writer living in the shadow of the war. Despite the fact that she’s pretty successful, lives in a gorgeous Chelsea flat, her dashing publisher Sidney (Matthew Goode) is also her bestie, and she’s courted by a handsome American soldier (Glen Powell), Juliet doesn’t seem to be as happy as one would think. But her life is about to take a different turn when she gets a letter from Dawsey Adams (Michiel Huisman), a member of The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society. Yep, the mouthful title is a book club that inadvertently got started on a fateful night involving Nazi soldiers in the occupied island of Guernsey. As the correspondence goes on, Juliet is set on writing a book about the book club, and so off she goes to an island in the English channel off the coast of Normandy.

I love the idea of a young woman setting of on an adventure, especially in a time when it wasn’t as free for women to do so. And I also love the fact that Juliet isn’t too eager to marry a seemingly too-good-to-be-true prince charming. Naturally, Juliet was treated like a celebrity once they meet the members of the Society, and that first meet-up where she was presented with the potato peel dish is a group meet-cute. I adore every single member of the Society, Amelia (Penelope Wilton), Elizabeth (Jessica Brown Findlay), Dawsey, Isola (Katherine Parkinson) and Eben (Tom Courtenay), the cast is a bit of a Downton Abbey mini-reunion with Goode, Findlay, Wilton and James herself were all part of the popular period drama cast. But despite their warm welcome, the group (especially Amelia) is vehemently opposed to the idea of Juliet writing an article about them for the Times.

The setback didn’t send Juliet immediately back to London. Instead she’s set on doing research about the German occupation on the island. As the group opens up to her more, she soon finds out about what has happened to Elizabeth. The less said about Juliet’s discovery the better, but it’s safe to say she has fallen in love with the town and the people in it. There’s a lovely tentative romance between Juliet and Dawsey (Huisman is sort of been type cast as romantic lead in period romances and he does well in these roles), but the bonding scenes between Juliet and the female members of the book club is equally delightful to watch. I have to say that Penelope Wilton is particularly memorable as the grieving mother. She’s a terrific character actress who can balance drama and comedy seamlessly.

Director Mike Newell (Four Weddings & A Funeral, 2012 Great Expectations) kept the tone pretty light despite some of the serious war-related scenes, he puts the focus more on the relationship between Juliet and the people she encounters. It sometimes feels like a rom-com, but with more at stakes given the time it’s set in. But it doesn’t quite escape the trappings of the genre in that the romance is completely predictable. Fortunately, there’s enough of a surprise surrounding the lives of the people involved and the poignant history they’ve been through that I’m still swept up and moved by it.

Visually and thematically, it feels something out of Jane Austen movies. It’s even more enchanting for me personally as the movie make some references Austen, as well as Wuthering Heights and Jane Eyre. The set pieces are gorgeous, there’s something so immensely charming about the small, coastal English town. It wasn’t filmed in Guernsey however, but instead the coastal exterior was shot in various UK locations such as Cornwall, Bristol, etc.  I also love the 40s period clothing that makes everyone so vintage chic.

This is definitely ‘comfort food’ for fans of period dramas like me, but fortunately a nutritious one. Interestingly, this was supposed to be a Kenneth Branagh production with Kate Winslet in the title. As much as I’m intrigued by that prospect, I have to say I like Lily James as Juliet and I appreciate Newell’s old-school, unabashedly-sweet approach. I would have liked to have seen more of [bespectacled, Clark-Kent like] Matthew Goode, but I enjoyed seeing every bit of him every time he’s on screen.

I’m glad this movie is on Netflix as I’d readily watch it again. As a writer, one of the biggest appeal for me is how the movie is practically a wonderful love letter to the written word.


Have you seen The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Society? I’d love to hear what you think!

Music Break: ABBA’s songs in Mamma Mia!

Happy midweek everyone! It’s kind of a sleepy Wednesday even though just exactly a week ago I was extremely busy casting for my upcoming short film project, Master Servant. It was my first time holding auditions (as I didn’t have to do that Hearts Want) and let’s just say it was quite an experience. I have even more appreciation for actors (especially working actors) and what they have to go through to land a part.

In any case, well I saw Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again last week… it had been such a whirlwind few weeks that I needed a crowd-pleaser type of movie and it definitely did the trick. It’s funny but when the original first came out, I didn’t even bother to see it and wasn’t really interested. But my friend in San Diego has the DVD so I ended up watching it when I visited her. I actually grew up listening to ABBA (who’s my brother’s fave) and it was fun nostalgia hearing the catchy tunes once again. As for the movie, well I don’t think it would’ve worked at all without ABBA’s music to be honest. It’s the kind of contagiously rousing songs you can’t help but being drawn to it, heck the songs have been stuck in my head for days since I saw the sequel! Plus having Meryl Streep and a pretty phenomenal cast doesn’t hurt. Amanda Seyfried is pretty good as Sophie (Streep’s daughter) but it’s Julie Walters and Christine Baranski who’s truly light up the screen. I wish we all had them as our besties!

Oh and the scenery!! Honestly, I was gawking at the amazing Greek islands (filmed on location on Skopelos, Skiathos and Damouhari Pelion) which surely have become a major tourist attraction now thanks to the movie. Who hasn’t fantasized living in such a incredible place, running a hotel with your handsome boyfriend and your three dads consist of Mr. Darcy, James Bond and Thor’s Dr. Selvig?? I mean, come on!!

Colin Firth, Stellan Skarsgård and Pierce Brosnan as Sophie’s three dads

It’s the kind of movie to just put off your thinking caps and be ready to groove! So here are some of my fave songs and/or scenes from the original and the sequel:

Ok yes it’s a silly movie, but I couldn’t help but tearing up a bit hearing this rendition of The Winner Takes It All (darn you Meryl!)

Donna looked so believably devastated in this scene… I wish the sequel had more oomph in showing her romance with Sam in the flashback scene. I feel like this scene in the original was far more emotional than the entire scene of young Donna & Sam in the sequel.

Oh man, what an end credits!! Such a hoot to see all the three dads in full disco gear. Looks like the entire cast had such a great time making this that they totally went all out in the bohemian spirit of the movie!!

I’ve been a fan of Lily James since Pride and Prejudice and Zombies and Cinderella, she’s instantly likable and apparently this girl can sing! I actually like her rendition of this melancholy song… yeah she’s my current girl crush.

I really, really enjoyed this scene and the song Why Did It Have To Be Me. I adore Lily James as young Donna (not an easy task playing the young version of a character originally played by Meryl Streep, but she did a fine job!) and Josh Dylan (young Bill) is my fave of the three young actors.

Well one of the highlights of the sequel is Cher (natch!)… and her fans would likely NOT be disappointed. She only appears at the end but her rendition of Fernando (a duet with Andy Garcia), as teased in all the promos, is pretty darn amusing.


Hope you enjoy this Music Break. Well, which ABBA song(s) is your favorite?