FlixChatter Review – 1917 (2020)

When I heard that Sam Mendes, the Oscar winning director of American Beauty and one of my favorite “James Bond” films, Skyfall, was releasing a World War I film, I was beyond intrigued. Centered around the spring of 1917 during the German retreat to the Hindenburg Line during Operation Alberich, Mendes wanted to incorporate a story his grandfather Alfred Mendes told him about a messenger and his heroic task during the war. The film, appropriately titled 1917, is takes place on the front lines in northern France, as the British 2nd Battalion of the Devonshire Regiment is planning to mount an attack on the retreating German forces. The Germans have mounted a retreat to the Hindenburg Line, but are planning to ambush the 2nd Battalion, a company battalion of 1,600 men, in hopes of catching the British forces by surprise.

Colin Firth in 1917

The movie opens on two young British soldiers, Lance Corporal William Schofield (George MacKay) and Lance Corporal Tom Blake (Dean-Charles Chapman) napping underneath a tree at the edge of the British trenches in northern France. Suddenly, Lance Corporal Blake is awaked by his commanding officer, telling him to pick a partner and report for further instructions from British General Erinmore (Colin Firth). General Erinmore tasks the two Lance Corporals to deliver a message to halt a British force of the 2nd Battalion before they walk into a trap laid by the German army. The General informs Blake and Schofield that among the 1,600 men of the 2nd Battalion is also Blake’s own brother, Lieutenant Joseph Blake (Richard Madden), and that they must to do the impossible: cross over No Man’s Land, evade enemy forces, and stay alive long enough to deliver a message to Colonel Mackenzie (Benedict Cumberbatch) at the front line that his 2nd Battalion is walking into a trap, set by the German Army.

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After Blake and Schofield cross into No Man’s Land, with some careful instruction from a Lieutenant Leslie (Andrew Scott), they reach the original German front, finding the trenches abandoned. Their worst feelings come true, as they find that the abandoned trenches turn out to be booby-trapped by the Germans in hopes of killing as many British soldiers as possible. Thanks to some (extremely large) rats who set off one of the booby-traps, the ensuing explosion almost kills Schofield. Thankfully, Blake is there to help Schofield out and they manage to run out of the collapsing bunkers just in time. Having to take shelter in ruined buildings, and sidestepping over unseen obstacles, Blake and Schofield arrive at an abandoned farmhouse and witness a dogfight between British and German planes nearby. SPOILER ALERT (highlight to read) – As a German pilot is shot down and crash lands near them, Blake and Schofield try to rescue the pilot from the burning wreckage, but the German soldier turns his knife on Blake and mortally wounds him.

As Schofield is now tasked to deliver the message to Colonel Mackenzie alone, he is picked up by a passing British contingent and dropped off near the bombed-out village of Écoust-Saint-Mein. Dodging snipers and climbing over collapsed bridges, Schofield is injured and gets knocked out by a ricocheting bullet. As he wakes up hours later, it is nightfall and Schofield tries to navigate the bombed out and collapsed buildings of Écoust-Saint-Mein, as the German soldiers set fire to large building, creating a giant blaze in the middle of the night and helping Schofield light the way around the town. Unfortunately, he also becomes the target of numerous German snipers, managing to evade them before he finds shelter in an abandoned basement, where he stumbles into the hiding place of a French woman and an infant. He leaves them some canned food and milk he had found at the abandoned farmhouse that he and Blake had found.

Bound by completing his mission, Schofield leaves the woman and infant, but not before learning that the place he is looking for is just down river from the village he was in. He runs past more German soldiers and snipers, and ends up jumping into the river, going over a waterfall and finding more dead bodies of soldiers from both sides. In the morning, he comes across a part of the British 2nd Battalion, as they wait and prepare to go into battle.

From them, he learns that they are actually a part of the second wave, and that while attack has already begun and Blake’s brother is among the first wave to go over the top, he still has time to reach Colonel Mackenzie before it’s too late. He sprints across the trenches and actually climbs onto the battlefield to reach Colonel Mackenzie, who is at first reluctant to call off the attack, but ends up relenting and follows General Erinmore and British Command’s instructions. Schofield is left to find Lieutenant Joseph Blake, SPOILER (highlight to read): and to inform him of his brother’s death. Lieutenant Blake thanks Schofield for his efforts and leaves Schofield to sit by a tree, finally able to rest after successfully completing his mission.

 

For 1917, Mendes collaborates again with award-winning cinematographer Roger Deakins, award-winning composer Thomas Newman and co-wrote the screenplay with Krysty Wilson-Cairns. Mendes and Deakins decided to shoot the movie as one long take, without cutting between scenes. Since it’s told from the point of view of Blake and Schofield, Mendes and Deakins rely on lead actors George MacKay and Dean-Charles Chapman to take the audience from the trenches, to the battlefields and abandoned farmhouses and other building. Both MacKay and Chapman tackle this challenge with much success, but it is really MacKay that makes the emotional connection needed to make his character relatable yet resilient. Chapman plays on the youth and inexperience of Lance Corporal Blake to make it seem like he needs Lance Corporal Schofield to succeed.

Even though we don’t see much of Benedict Cumberbatch, Andrew Scott, Richard Madden or Colin Firth, they each fulfill their roles to advance the plot line and bring the notion of familiarity and comfort to the audience, who has been carrying along with the two relatively-unknown lead actors. Not knowing the fates of the two lead British soldiers was a clever tactic used by Mendes, and losing one or both soldiers in battle would not be as big of a setback to the viewers if their message would somehow end up reaching its destination. Had Mendes cast household recognizable actors in those roles, it would have been much harder for the story to develop in the direction that it did. Thomas Newman’s score is also very memorable and fits perfectly into the wartime arc of the movie.

This is one my top-10 movies of the year and I’d be surprised if it didn’t get nominated for multiple Academy Awards. It just won the Golden Globe Award for Best Drama this past Sunday, and Sam Mendes won the Golden Globe for Best Director. I’d also like to see nominations for Thomas Newman’s score, Mendes and Krysty Wilson-Cairns’ screenplay and perhaps most of all, Roger Deakins’ cinematography.

This is a deeply memorable film that will be remembered as one of the best World War I movies of all time, and it ranks as perhaps one of the best war movies ever made. It is not to be missed, especially in an IMAX theater and I give it my wholehearted, unabridged endorsement.

– Review by Vitali Gueron


Have you seen 1917? Well, what did you think? 

FlixChatter Review: Captain Fantastic (2016)

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The title of the film may sound like a superhero film but this indie drama is as far away from the ubiquitous genre as it can get. It made me think of The Sound of Music if Captain Von Trapp were to uproot his entire family to the Austrian Alps and homeschooled all his kids instead of hiring Maria.

Set in the forests of the Pacific Northwest, Ben Cash has been living off the grid with his six kids. The film opened with a deer hunting scene that’s quite graphic and intense, prompting the woman next to me to leave the theater and never came back. Perhaps she’s an animal lover or something, but I think it’s her loss that she missed out on this film because of it.

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It’s a provocative way to open a film, and an effective one as well as we get to see right away how Ben has raised his kids, Bodevan, Kielyr, Vespyr, Rellian, Zaja and Nai, with vigorous physical and mental training. They live their lives without any of the conveniences and daily luxuries most kids in modern society won’t be able to survive even for a day. Though the kids don’t follow common academic curriculum, they’re taught to be critical thinkers. Instead of playing video games or lying around listening to music all day, the Cash kids read books, play music, hunt for food, and actually spend time with each other.

It’s a really fascinating slice of an unorthodox life, anchored by a soulful yet physical role by Viggo Mortensen. There are numerous themes that are explored here. Parenting is a big one, and I think every parents (especially in America) would benefit from watching this. The scene when the Cash family visit their conventional aunt and uncle in the city (played by Kathryn Hahn and Steve Zahn), it shows a stark contrast of how their respective kids are brought up. The Cash kids are well-versed in the the Bill of Rights and know who Karl Marx is, while their cousins are far more knowledgeable about pop culture. If I were a parent, it certainly would make me ponder just how much (or I should say how little) kids are learning in school!

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Their lives take an unexpected turn with news of the death of Ben’s wife, Leslie. It’s not a spoiler to reveal that because that even it the catalyst to the journey the Cash family had to take. Ben didn’t spare their feelings when he revealed the news, and it’s certainly a poignant moment that’s beautifully portrayed. The Cash family have to leave their idyllic existence in order to attend Leslie’s funeral, and in the course of that journey, Ben is challenged with the idea what it really means to be a parent and brings into question all his philosophies/beliefs he’s taught his kids.

Now, one does not have to subscribe to his worldview to emphasize with Ben. I for one don’t see eye to eye with him on a spiritual level. Instead of Christmas, they celebrate Noam Chomsky Day. He also vehemently opposes Christian funeral traditions, claiming that his wife had become a Buddhist believer and would rather be cremated instead. Now, while one might admire Ben’s parenting style and what his kids accomplished, no doubt they’d run into issues given that they’ve lived such a sheltered life and away from society. The kids are respectful and bright, but lacking in common social graces. “You made us freaks!” one of the kids, Rellian (Nicholas Hamilton), screamed at Ben. He’s got a point there and the film shows many examples of that. The scene where the eldest Bodevan (George MacKay) promptly proposes to a girl after kissing her at an RV campground is funny but rather sad as well. The film is peppered with funny and amusing moments, but a lot of the humor isn’t slapstick but laden with irony and poignancy.

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The themes of parenting and coming-of-age blend seamlessly, and in a way it’s a coming-of-age of sort for Ben as well as a father. The main conflict arises between Ben and his father in-law Jack (Frank Langella), who sternly opposes Ben’s way of life and how his grandchildren are raised. It seems at first that Jack is painted as the *villain* of the film that threatens to separate the kids from their father, but fortunately the film isn’t so simplistic. Liberal sensibilities seem to prevail here, but writer/director Matt Ross doesn’t present things in a formulaic way, and there’s a vast thought-provoking themes being explored here. He boldly presents a compelling yet flawed hero, and chose an absolutely perfect actor in Viggo to do the job.

He’s the epitome of intellectual free spirit, a Renaissance man who’s set in his ways. The intensely charismatic Viggo Mortensen bared all for the role, mentally and physically. I’d hope to see his name popping up in the Best Actor race come award season. There’s a rather amusing nude scene, made more hilarious by the reaction of the people who saw him being so nonchalant about it, as if it’s the most natural thing in the world. The challenge to normalcy seems to be what the whole movie is about, and it certainly gives you plenty of food for thought.

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The movie works largely because of the talented cast. In addition to MacKay and Hamilton, we’ve got Samantha Isler, Annalise Basso, Shree Crooks and Charlie Shotwell as the talented young actors who play Ben’s children. Each have their moments to shine and you believe them as a close-knit family. The only thing I wish were explored a bit better is the relationship between Ben and Leslie. The only flashback scenes we get are mere glimpses of the two gazing lovingly at each other, which doesn’t reveal anything about Leslie’s mental condition or suicidal tendencies.

It’s been a couple of months since I saw Captain Fantastic, which was my JULY Movie of the Month AND it’s also one of my fave 2016 films so far. It’s a beautifully-shot film with panoramic shots of the Pacific Oceans and the Rocky Mountains region. Certainly a film that subscribe to the old adage that it’s the journey, not the destination that really matters. It’s certainly one of the most eccentric films I’ve seen this year, both amusing and haunting, but definitely indelible.

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Have you seen ‘Captain Fantastic’? Let me know what you think! 

TCFF Day 7 reviews: The Liability, Casual Encounters, How I Live Now

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Now that TCFF has wrapped, I’ll be posting some reviews from the last few days of the film fest, as well as which films won the TCFF Awards which was announced last night. Glad to see some of my personal favorites getting nominated. You can check out the list here.

Now here are some films from Day 7 that are worth checking out:

How I Live Now

by Ruth Maramis

I have not heard about this film until it was announced as a TCFF lineup. I was immediately drawn to it because of Saoirse Ronan who’s been excellent in everything I’ve seen her in so far. This time it’s no different. In this film adaptation of novel by Meg Rosoff, Ronan plays an angst-y American teenager Daisy, who reluctantly goes to spend her Summer vacation with her cousin in an English countryside. Once she’s there, the rural house is in complete mess as her four cousins, Isaac (Tom Holland), Piper (Harley Bird), Edmond “Eddie” (George MacKay) pretty much had to look after themselves as their mom is involved in a mysterious project, something about the ‘peace process,’ who’s quickly whisked to Geneva, never to be seen again.

What starts out as an idyllic vacation, complete with picnic, lake-swimming, and a blossoming teen romance between Daisy and Eddie, life is soon turned upside down for them as war suddenly broke out, seemingly out of nowhere. Whilst there are hints along the way that of what looks to be a World War III scenario, from news footage on TV, signs of military presence, etc., when nuke effect “snow” from a London nuclear attack falling on them, it still came as quite a surprise. As the country descend into a violent and chaotic military state, Daisy is given a chance to return to America, but yet she chooses to stay with Eddie.

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The last half of the film becomes a journey for survival story as Daisy and Piper flee a forced-labor camp through the woods. The pacing of the film drags at times, and I find the film’s relentlessly-allusive storyline a bit frustrating. I like a good mystery but somehow this film felt more elusive than truly suspenseful. I also feel like the chemistry between the characters a bit lacking. The romance is far from gripping and the pairing of Daisy and Piper also didn’t quite mesh well, though both actors did a good job. Thus I didn’t feel as emotionally-involved with the characters as I otherwise would.

I do think the premise is intriguing though, and there’s enough going for it here that kept me engaged. The tone is dark and pretty grim, especially the last third of the film, with some gruesome doomsday scenes that warrants its R rating. Just like she did in Hanna, Ronan pretty much carried the film here and she’s more than capable. She easily outshines everyone else in this film, though Harley Bird as Piper has some scene-stealing moments. The cinematography is gorgeous as well, giving us a stark contrast between the serene and lush pastoral beauty and the sinister apocalyptic views of a doomed future.

As far as young adult stories go though, this one is certainly far more compelling than other ‘supernaturally-themed’ offerings out there. I quite like the hopeful but not ‘too neat’ ending, though some might feel it’s a bit anti-climactic. It could’ve been a bit more compelling, especially coming from director Kevin Macdonald (The Last King of Scotland, State of Play), but I’d say it’s worth a rent though if you’re a fan of the talents involved.

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Casual Encounters

by Adam Wells

Casual Encounters is an anthology film about people who meet other people online for a casual night of love. The movie shows five different people’s experience with a casual encounter and they do intertwine as some characters show up in multiple storylines. The film is really 5 short films and in some cases they have been shown separately in some cases but Casual Encounters has them shown altogether.

The movie has excellent performances all around, the actors and actresses in this film handle the maturity of the content of this nature. In particular the character of Eric who is the only one to appear in three storylines including his own, his character has many levels of depth to him as his life is a bit complicated. Eric is portrayed by Aaron Mathias (who was also the star of Things I Don’t Understand which premiered at TCFF last year), and he is definitely an actor to keep on your radar.

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The movie has many settings that take place at night, but despite that the cinematography is done very well, while also different color palettes for lighting in each story’s setting. As each story differs in its nature of intimacy and sexual orientation, the colors of the lighting seem to change, and that shows the producers and director really thought through the composition of the shots wanted the viewer to associate certain colors with certain interactions, as Eric’s story is the final one in the film and has multiple settings as opposed to the other stories that have one or two.

Overall, Casual Encounters is an excellent film and comes highly recommended due to its amazing performances, elaborate world it creates with intertwining storylines, and its content that is usually not shown in films. The film plays against the viewers expectations as it has romantic movie plots but they don’t play out as most romantic movie plots usually play out, which is always pleasant to see.
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The Liability

by Sarah Johnson

A movie with good plot twists that also wraps up all the loose ends by the time the credits roll? The Liability, the new crime tale directed by Craig Viveiros and written by John Wrathall, does just that. It stars Tim Roth as Roy, a world weary hit man who only wants to retire so he can attend his daughter’s wedding, and Jack O’Connell as Adam, the 19 year old stepson of Roy’s gangster boss Peter (Peter Mullan). When Adam wrecks Peter’s car he gives him a job of becoming Roy’s driver as a way to work off his debt. “It’s either that or the septic tank,” Peter says.
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Of course things don’t go according to plan. A bizarre string of events involve a girl, a hippie van and the true reason Adam was paired with Roy. Suffice it to say, when I heard a nearby audience member gasp at one of the plot twists, I knew the filmmakers had done their job. Casting Tim Roth in one of the starring roles was a good choice as his wry acting style is a good mix with the sexy edginess of the movie. (“I haven’t killed a woman since 1983,” he proclaims.)
The one thing I found slightly lacking was the chemistry between O’Connell and Roth- it would have been nice to see them play off each other more. Some might say the movie is a little too by-the-book in wrapping it up at the end. I appreciate movies that keep you guessing as well but is walking out of the theatre feeling like you understood everything so wrong?

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So that about wraps up our Day 7 reviews. Any thoughts about any of these films?

DVD Picks: The Cove, The Boys Are Back, Bright Star

The Cove – Documentary
Synopsis: Using state-of-the-art equipment, a group of activists, led by renown dolphin trainer Ric O’Barry, infiltrate a cove near Taiji, Japan to expose both a shocking instance of animal abuse and a serious threat to human health.

This doc was highly-recommended by a group of friends as we’re having dinner. I haven’t watched many documentaries, but I know that if done well, it can be as powerful and thrilling as any film. The Cove is definitely one that delivers suspense, thrill, and adrenaline rush, but most of all, emotional punch! Even in the first few minutes, one feels for the dolphins and the man who strives to save them. O’Barry is the man who started it all, and he told the cameras that he felt partly responsible for the public’s fascination with dolphins as he was the trainer for the TV show Flipper. The show’s popularity no doubt kicked off the multimillion-dollar seaquarium industry. “I spent 10 years building, and the next 35 trying to tear down,” he said. His change of heart happened right after Kathy, the lead dolphin of the show, died in his arms. He even called it a suicide as the mammal was so miserable living in that man-made water tank. Ever since that day, he put everything he had into the cause of freeing the dolphins.

The large part of this eco-documentary took place in a cove in Taiji where approximately 23,000 dolphins are slaughtered in the most heinous way every year. Filmmaker Louie Psihoyos (known for his photography work for National Geographic) – who’s also a licensed scuba diver – brought a group of daredevil volunteers that include a pair of world-class divers, tech experts and cameramen to help O’Barry’s cause. It’s fascinating watching them find clever ways to get some video footage of this secret ‘slaughter house,’ even enlisting Psihoyos’ friend from Industrial Light Magic! The documentary also delves deeper into mercury-poisoning, with research/analysis support from Japanese scientists. If you eat sushi and fish regularly, you definitely need to watch this!

There’s a reason this movie won a gazillion awards (there are at least 20 of them listed in Wikipedia). But even with all the tech gizmos and breathtaking underwater scenery, what makes this doc great is it never forgets the ‘heart’ of the story, which are O’Barry with his inspiring tenacity, and of course, the subject of his cause. The scenes of the dolphins swimming freely and happily in the ocean are so beautiful and moving, and an Aussie pro surfer told a touching tale of how these dolphins actually saved him from a shark attack. The way these friendly cetaceans are depicted here make the brutal slaying all the more devastating. Suffice to say, I won’t be going to Sea World ever again after this, and I’m certainly glad I don’t eat fish!

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The Boys Are Back
Synopsis: Set in South Australia, this memoir-based film tells the story of a sports-writer Joe Warr who’s suddenly faced with the task of raising his young son after the untimely death of his second wife.

Growing up without a father myself, I’m somewhat drawn to fatherhood-type of movies like this one and Dear Frankie with Gerard Butler. Perhaps I’m also curious how these typically bad-ass actors would fare in a soulful, quieter roles. Well, let me just say that Clive Owen pulls off the tricky role of a grieving husband and befuddled dad believably, which is a 180-degree change from his perpetually cool and confident action hero we’re used to seeing. This film no doubt tugs your heart strings but veers away from being too sentimental or schmaltzy. The credits goes to Owen’s affecting performance, but George MacKay (Harry) and Nicholas McAnulty (Artie) who play his kids are just as noteworthy.

There’s something deliberately unfussy about how the story is told, this is definitely a better and more poignant parenting-themed film from director Scott Hicks than No Reservations with Catherine Zeta-Jones and Aaron Eckhart. Joe’s journey and his struggle to cope with 6-year-old Artie – who doesn’t know how to express his own grief – feels genuinely real. There’s a particular scene when Artie throws tantrum during an arduous road trip, McAnulty’s wordless performance with his wide, evocative eyes is heart-wrenching. Refusing the help of his protective mother-in-law, Joe sets his own parenting rule, which no doubt make his house look like it’s been hit by a tornado. But somehow, the father and son muddle through the best they know how, and the way the story was handled make their eventual bond feel natural and unforced. I also like the fact that the movie doesn’t gloss over Joe’s past mistakes of abandoning his first wife and son for another woman, nor does it set an unrealistic turn of events as an excuse to ‘spice things up.’ I’m referring to the tentative ‘romance’ if you will, between Joe and a young, benevolent recent divorcee Laura, though it’s clear their attraction is mutual.

Things get more interesting as Joe’s angst-ridden teenage son comes to visit from England. I laughed when Joe explains of the his rules of ‘no cussing’ to Harry, as he himself repeatedly uses God’s name in vain. So blasphemy apparently doesn’t count as foul language? [shakes head] In any case, tension mounts between Joe and Harry, who feels abandoned by his father. At the same time, conflicts arise when the demand of his job requires him to travel. A series of events that follow make the three of them analyze and truly ponder what it means to be a family. As the voice-over says, “life is a journey to be traveled no matter how bad the road,” it really resonates with me, and how true that statement is. There’s really no such thing as a ‘perfect’ family, but we’re all called to make the best of what we have. The Boys Are Back is a satisfying ride, both emotionally and visually, boasting stunning scenery of South Australia countryside with its rolling hills, dusty roads. This easily rival Baz Luhrman’s Australia as a tourism-boasting flick for the land down under.

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Bright Star

Synopsis: Period drama based on the three-year romance between 19th century poet John Keats and Fanny Brawne, which was cut short by Keats’ untimely death at age 25.

My girlfriends and I watched this on our monthly movie nite last month. I’m a sucker for period dramas, a mere mention of tragic/unrequited/slow-burn love stories and I’m there! Given the unanimous critical praise (97% on Rotten Tomatoes!), I was prepared to be dazzled. Alas, the movie doesn’t quite live up to its title. Such a pity because it seems to have a lot going for it and certainly John Keats’ story is worth-telling.

So what’s the problem?

Well, for one it’s the agonizing pace. Granted a measured pace is what one should expect from movies of this genre, but there’s s-l-o-w and there’s s…l…o..o..o..o…w… I mean it just trudges along far too long that our patience is wearing thin. It’s as if the director wants us to reflect meditate on all the lush photography (they are indeed stunning) and savor every little detail on a room, the wildflowers, a bonnet, pretty much everything the camera captures. The critics call this ‘understated’ but the word I’d use is tedious.

But the crucial reason this movie fail to captivate us is because we simply couldn’t connect with Fanny the way we did with other heroines of similar genres, i.e. Jane Austen’s Fannie Price, The Dashwoods, Lizzy Bennett, or most notably Margaret Hale from Elizabeth Gaskells’ North and South. It’s not so much as the actress’ fault as the way her character’s written. Fanny comes out like a whiny & spoiled brat at times, and certainly fits her reputation of being a frivolous fashionista. Yet despite her affinity for fashion, her costumes aren’t that fabulous. Yet Campion keeps hitting us over the head with all the details… yes, yes I get it, she’s a fashion designer, but if I want to see a movie about clothes, I might as well rent The September Issue! Then there’s John Keats himself. I’ve heard lots of good things about Ben Wishaw, but somehow his portrayal comes across as eternally glum and frail, sans the charismatic quality the real poet supposedly had. Worst of all, I don’t find him appealing at all, nor do I find that undeniable chemistry between the two.

Perhaps it’s due to those very reasons that the movie fail to engage on the crucial selling point: the romance. Despite all the flirtation, the poetic letters, the longing glances, I just don’t ‘feel the love,’ that burning passion so fierce and vigorous that a serene bloke like Keats can only express through his poems. I’m not dismissing Keat’s poems by any means, but I don’t think one need to be well-versed in poetry in order to empathize with people falling in love. But even by the end of this movie, I feel like I still don’t know what to make of the characters & their motivation.

Perhaps the one ‘bright’ thing about the movie is Abbie Cornish’s performance. Despite what I’ve said about her character, it’s undeniable that Cornish is a talented actress. She has a certain grace about her and her acting seems refreshingly authentic. I dare say she has a huge potential to follow in the footsteps of Kate Winslet or Cate Blanchett because she really is that talented. The one scene where I shed a tear is when John’s death is announced, which caused Fanny to sob so forcefully she’s gasping for air. That performance alone merits an Oscar nomination! Paul Schneider as Keats’ best friend Charles Brown turn in a compelling performance as well. In fact, I could say that his character leaves more of an impression to everyone in our group than the poet himself.

To sum things up, Bright Star isn’t a terrible movie, it’s got its fine moments I suppose, but it’s definitely not great.

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So readers, have you seen or plan to see any of these flicks? Please let me know your thoughts in the comments section.