Guest Review: JACKIE (2016)

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Directed By: Pablo Larraín
Written By: Noah Oppenheim
Cast: Natalie Portman, Peter Sarsgaard, Great Gerwig, John Hurt
Runtime: 1 hr 40 minutes

History and drama often make awkward bedfellows as you might find in the bio-pic Jackie (2016). The assassination of JFK is one of the defining moments of the 20th century and any dramatization of the immediate aftermath is a risky venture. History buffs may fault it and others may struggle with its melodramatic interpretation of Jaqueline Kennedy’s life-defining event. But look beyond the cinematic limitations and you find a complex portrait of a remarkable person who endured an unimaginable horror with rare strength and dignity.

The film’s starts with the motorcade in which John F. Kennedy was assassinated and ends with his funeral. The narrative is framed around a journalist’s interview conducted a week after the event and a confessional talk with a priest at the funeral. It uses their questions and comments to trigger flashbacks to the short JFK presidency, with dramatisations that craft together archival footage and historical photographs. The title of the film makes it clear that this is a portrait of Jackie (played by Natalie Portman) so her words, her emotions, and her actions are the primary focus. The film’s narrative tension comes entirely from the depiction of her inner world of private trauma and her struggles with the political and public reaction to the event.

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The most striking aspect of Portman’s portrayal is her ability to present several sides of the one persona as if she and Jackie shared multiple personalities. Once you recover from the distraction that Portman barely resembles Jaqueline Kennedy, she takes you on an emotional roller-coaster, from terror, anger, hate, confusion, mental vacillation and disorientation to calm resolve about her role in history. Throughout it all she remains committed to turning a tragedy into national mythology based on political heroism, the Kennedy legend, and the Camelot fairy tale. While there is a commendable support cast, this is a one-woman performance and Portman’s portrayal is a tour de force.

Some will find this film an unflattering interpretation of Jaqueline Kennedy while others will find that it helps them to sympathetically understand the person behind the mask. The film steers a fine line in avoiding judgement and it is Portman’s dramatic ability to step into Jackie’s soul and to capture her mental trauma that ultimately shines. No bio-pic is perfect and you need to overlook scenes where the film struggles with period authenticity. Set this aside and you will be rewarded with a memorable performance about an unforgettable event.

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cinemuseRichard Alaba, PhD
CineMuse Films
Member, Australian Film Critics Association
Sydney, Australia


Have you seen ‘JACKIE’? Well, what did you think? 

Guest Review: ELLE (2016)

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Directed By: Paul Verhoeven
Written By: David Birke
Runtime: 2 hrs 10 minutes

The women’s film genre covers the spectrum of feminine empowerment to absolute degradation and several can be read both ways. Elle (2016) is an ambivalent film that can be read as a tale of self-assertion or, equally valid, about victimhood, transgressive sexuality and gender disrespect. The story is framed against the violent porn video game industry where women are routinely sacrificed to male gratification and dominance. Porn video games normalise sexual assault and other forms of humiliation and this cyber reality merges with the Elle narrative on fantasy and victimhood.

Michelle (Isabelle Huppert) is a successful Parisian video game entrepreneur who leads a company of testosterone-fueled hipsters whose job it is to hyper-stimulate young males into doing things to women in video cyber-worlds. The film’s opening scenes are both disturbing and banal: Michelle appears to be violently raped by a masked intruder and then proceeds to tidy up the mess with barely more than an air of inconvenience. No, it is not a video game, and yes, it happens again as do several other normalised sexual transgressions. For example, when she discovers the staffer who pasted her face onto a video game assault victim she asks the person to expose his genitals in her office. Rather than an opportunity for reverse humiliation or worse, she only says “pretty” and walks off leaving us wondering if she is seriously cool or seriously damaged.

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Divergent plotlines fill out the character of Michelle to explain the reasons for her impassivity. Her father is in prison for crimes against children and her mother pays for sex with younger men. She sleeps with her business partner’s husband and lusts for her neighbour, and compulsively tells lies in her twilight world between video game brutality and real-world morality. While appearing indestructible in her business life her emotional world is a fragile void that cannot be filled with normal relationships. The several scenes that dwell suggestively on her face oozing repressed sexual desire hint darkly of a deeply troubled soul.

This is a compelling film that examines the parallel universe of a woman who is both a perpetrator and a victim of sexual transgression and who lives under the guise of wealth and respectability. As such, it is also a portrait of hypocrisy and moral extremities with audience voyeurism forming the picture frame. Isabelle Huppert pushes this role to its limits while showing little emotion beyond what she can say with her expressive eyes. It is hard to judge a survivor like her, and we can only guess what keeps her head together. This film is one of many that push back the cultural envelope that has kept women’s sexuality on a pedestal.

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cinemuseRichard Alaba, PhD
CineMuse Films
Member, Australian Film Critics Association
Sydney, Australia

 


Have you seen ‘ELLE’? Well, what did you think? 

Everybody’s Chattin + Most-Anticipated Movies from TIFF 2016

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Happy Wednesday everyone! Hope you’re all in good health. Well, my Rheumatoid Arthritis flared up again earlier this week that I had to stay home Monday as I could barely lift my water bottle, let alone drive. My left hand is still swollen which makes typing a pain but thank goodness for Aleve!

In any case, I did have a blast watching Bridget Jones Baby last night…

 

Ok how about those links!

Well if you’re paying attention to film festivals like me, you’re likely been following Toronto International Film Festival that’s going on this week through this Sunday.

Lucky Jay & her crew have been covering TIFF this year, check out her blog for reviews, including La La Land!

Courtney just posted her thoughts on the highly-anticipated The Birth of A Nation, one of those films that I still want to see and judge for myself.

Another Torontonian Ryan also attended TIFF, check out his review of Andrea Arnold’s American Honey

Margaret is back with her phenomenal visual parallel posts, this time on Neon Demon vs. Black Swan

Meanwhile, Nostra just caught up with Kevin Costner’s crime flick Criminal 

Jordan just reviewed the YA thriller Nerve, whose composer Rob Simonsen I’ll be featuring later this week!

Allie reviewed an early 2000s comedy that I happened to enjoy quite a bit, Napoleon Dynamite

The Sea of Trees has been completely lambasted by critics, well looks like Khalid agreed w/ them

Paul just talks about the classic rom-com The Philadelphia Story 

Hey it’s back to school season, so check out Michael‘s answers on his Back-t0-School Movie Quiz!

Last but not least, check out Cindy‘s latest Lucky 13 on the topic of Al Pacino the Mentor


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So, speaking of TIFF, I’ve been reading a bunch of TIFF reviews the past week. There are some I’ve been anticipating (i.e. Free Fire which sounds like a blast), but some new ones I just heard about that intrigued me (Korean crime drama The Age of Shadows, British WWII drama Their Finest). ELLE starring Isabelle Huppert sounds brutal but then again what do you expect from agent provocateur Paul Verhoeven. It’s also one of the films my crush Sam Riley saw at Cannes last May 😉

Of course the buzz surrounding the musical La La Land and sci-fi drama Arrival have been incredible, I sure hope they both lived up to the hype! So if I were to list my top 10 most anticipated movies out of TIFF, this is what it’d look like:

You can check out IMDB’s TIFF mini guide or The Hollywood Reporter‘s coverage for a list of movies screened at TIFF.
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So what’s YOUR most anticipated movies out of TIFF 2016?