Cheers Virtual Cinema! Minnesota Film Festivals go online

In this strange and difficult times, it’s particularly tough for movie fans everywhere as movie theaters are closed and new movies are being delayed as we’re all in lockdown mode. But hey, I just thought how we should still be grateful we live in the age of the internet! Imagine if this happened in a time where there’s no online content to help us cope and escape from our every day life… I mean Coronavirus or not, I honestly can’t imagine life without having internet access!

The MSPIFF tag line for this year’s fest is ​Adjust Your View… I can’t imagine whoever came up with that has a crystal ball to predict that we’ll be in this um, predicament. Nor would that person realize how fitting that tagline as the audience is called to adjust our view as to how to experience a film festival. Per this MNDaily article, The MSP Film Society’s Virtual Cinema Collection platform, which went live March 20, offers access to what programming director Jesse Bishop calls “festival-style content.” It will be open 1-3 new movies every Friday, with most films running for at least two weeks. Ticket prices range from $10 to $12, and films are available for viewing anywhere from 48 hours to a few days after purchase, depending on the film. Here are just a small sampling of the lineup…

BALLOON

A thriller-like true story of one of the most spectacular escapes of the 20th Century.

With a theatrical release to coincide with the 30th anniversary of Germany’s reunification, Balloon is based on the true events of one of the most daring escapes of the Cold War in which two families living in Communist East Germany sailed over the heavily fortified border in a homemade hot-air balloon.


THE ROADS NOT TAKEN

Now this one is by an acclaimed female director with a star-studded cast!

Sally Potter’s The Roads Not Taken follows a day in the life of Leo (Javier Bardem) and his daughter, Molly (Elle Fanning) as she grapples with the challenges of her father’s chaotic mind. While they weave their way through New York City, Leo’s journey takes on a hallucinatory quality as he floats through alternate lives he could have lived, leading Molly to wrestle with her own path as she considers her future. Also starring Salma Hayek and Laura Linney.

 


The Etruscan Smile will be ready for home viewing starting tomorrow. I love Brian Cox, so definitely intrigued by this.

The Etruscan Smile stars Brian Cox (HBO’s Succession and recent Broadway leading man in The Great Society) as Rory MacNeil, a rugged old Scotsman who reluctantly leaves his beloved isolated Hebridean island and travels to San Francisco to seek medical treatment. Moving in with his estranged son, Rory’s life will be transformed, just when he expects it least, through a newly found love for his baby grandson.


MSPIFF isn’t the only MN film festival that offers online programming. Twin Cities Film Fest also launched its own independent movie streaming platform, called TCFF Streams, on April 6. Not only would the platform offer thought provoking and entertaining American independent storytelling content, it will also spotlight past TCFF films and filmmakers, alongside other award winning content from across the country. Best of all, TCFF will revenue share with our artists!

Check out some of the best indie docs, feature films and shorts that have screened at TCFF. Even as we’re self-quarantining amidst state-mandated lockdown, we can still support local non-profit organizations AND the filmmakers that made the films!


What are YOUR thoughts about film festivals going virtual? 

Ranking the BOURNE villains – from worst to best

Ted_reviewRankingBourneVillains

Every hero requires a villain and the Jason Bourne franchise has plenty of villains to root against. I do want to see him go up against other groups of villains though, as opposed to just CIA bigwigs and their hired assassins. Maybe for the next sequel, Bourne could take down some other group of baddies. In the meantime, here’s my list of worst to best villains of the franchise so far. Please note I’m excluding The Bourne Legacy without Matt Damon in the lead because that’s a crappy film and I don’t count it as part of the Bourne franchise.

Naturally this post contains spoilers so proceed with caution if you haven’t seen any of the Bourne films yet.

4. The Bourne Supremacy – Ward Abbot, Gretkov and Kirill

Even though it’s my favorite film of the franchise, I thought the villains were pretty weak. Abbot (Brian Cox) was just a greedy weasel who tried to cover up his mess when the shit hit the storm. Gretkov is a typical powerful businessman whose only goal was to get super rich and killed anyone who got in his way. I like Karl Urban’s assassin character here but he didn’t have much to do. He’s just another hired gun and nothing else. I would’ve loved to see more development of his character and maybe that epic climatic car chase between him and Bourne would’ve been even sweeter.

3. The Bourne Ultimatum – Noah Vosen, Ezra Kramer and Paz

I like David Strathairn as an actor but somehow I thought he’s sort of miscast here as the lead villain in this third Bourne film. Vosen is basically a Yes Man type of character whose main goal was to keep his boss out of trouble. To me he’s not menacing enough to be the lead villain in a spy film. Now the true villain in the film was actually Scott Glenn’s character but we saw so little of him that he became non-existent. Edgar Ramirez’s Paz was just another hired gun whose mission is to kill Bourne.

Strathairn_BourneUltimatum

2. Jason Bourne – Robert Dewey and Asset

In the newest Boune film, these two villains were given more to do than just trying to take down Bourne. Dewey (Tommy Lee Jones) is an old school type of person and he truly believes what he’s doing is to keep the US safe from terror. He’s cunning and very manipulative and of course dangerous if you decide to cross him.

Cassel_JasonBourne

Vincent Cassel’s assassin character was given some motivation as to why he wanted to kill Bourne and I thought it worked pretty well. He’s not just another hired gun who wants Bourne dead; he got his own agenda and won’t listen to reasons until Bourne is gone. For those who’ve seen the film, you’re probably why I didn’t mention Heather Lee. Well I’m not sure if she’s truly a villainous person or someone who still wants to use Bourne to climb the CIA power ladder. I think of her as the younger version of Pamela Landy.

1. The Bourne Identity – Conklin and The Professor

Chris Cooper’s villainous turn in the first film is still my favorite. He’s got as much screen time as Bourne and also has some juiciest and fun scenes. My favorite scene is when he found out the French police has screwed up and alarmed Bourne and then Bourne was able to get away, again. He’s started screaming in the CIA operation room and everyone was silent and scared shitless. I think most of us have been in that situation when your boss loses his cool and you don’t know what to say. His confrontation scene with Bourne near the end was another one I really enjoy, I thought Cooper totally outshine Damon in that scene.

Clive Owen’s The Professor wasn’t on the screen that much but his mysterious character somehow made more impact than other assassins in the franchise. His scene with Bourne before his death (shown above) is still my favorite; it’s quite and kind of chilling as to what these assassin has to go through in their daily lives.

TedS_post


Ruth’s Take

I agree with Ted’s list though I probably would switch #3 and #4 because I think Brian Cox and Karl Urban are far more interesting than the David Strathairn/Edgar Ramirez pairing. In fact I barely remember Ramirez whilst all the chase scenes with Urban is extremely memorable.

Owen_BourneIdentity
“I always work alone.”

I totally agree with Ted’s number 1 pick, and that chilling final scene between Damon and Owen is one of my favorites of the entire franchise. Owen displays such a compelling vulnerability as an assassin that made the character human instead of just another cold killing machine.


So what do you think of this list? How would YOU rank the Bourne villains?

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[Slow] Weekend Roundup, X-Men 2 & Musings on Expendables 3

It’s been a slow weekend for me in terms of movie watching but a hectic one otherwise. My hubby & I hosted a potluck Saturday night which was a ton of fun. There was a ton of food as well, three different kinds of curry dishes, a Kim-chee dish, coconut rice, tofu w/ peanut sauce, etc. and I haven’t even talked about desert yet 😀

Sunday afternoon I went to the second staff meeting for the fifth annual Twin Cities Film Fest! It’s coming up in less than two months (October 16!) and I’m waiting with bated breath which movies we’ll be getting this year! Film fans who live in the area, please consider supporting this amazing event tailored for cinephiles like you. We’ve got a special Member Drive where you can catch a sneak preview into films premiering at TCFF, see info below or click the graphic for more info.

TCFFMemberDrive

So this weekend I didn’t go to the cinema at all. In fact I only saw one movie and that’s a rewatch of X-Men 2. I was inspired by this Superhero Blog Relay last week, and the fact that it’s perhaps my favorite from the franchise before X-Men: Days of Future Past came along. I still loved it as much as I did before, perhaps one day I might do a full review of it.

X-Men2

My favorite scenes are the Magneto prison escape, anything with Brian Cox as the villain William Stryker, and that awesome finale with Jean Grey turning into Phoenix. After seeing this, my hubby said how much he hated Brett Ratner for ruining her character in X-Men 3, especially after such a breathtaking cliffhanger!  There’s so much potential for her character arc that wasn’t explored well at all by that hack director. Heh, I sure hope he won’t ever be back working on another X-Men movie ever again… or any good franchise for that matter.

Quick notes on this weekend’s box office. WOW, the power of Bayhem is really something! Those Ninja Turtles won again, practically beating every new movies opening this week. Even those Geriatric action heroes in Expendables 3 can’t overpower those ninja turtles?! Only the Guardians of the Galaxy in its third week was a close match!

1. Ninja Turtles $28,400,000
2. Guardians of the Galaxy $24,735,000
3. Let’s Be Cops $17,700,000

Earlier this year, I asked if people still love geriatric movie stars blowing stuff up in action flicks. Majority of the commenters said yes, they still do love ’em aging stars, but maybe not enough to see ’em on the big screen?

Expendables3Cast

Expendables 3 made only $16 mil, which was only about half of what the second movie made two years ago. Hmmm, so maybe this franchise is on its last leg eh? Same could be said about most of the cast anyway. Really, Sly should stop now anyway, I mean stretching this bombastic shoot-em-up party to a trilogy is already well, quite a stretch as it is. But what I didn’t know until an hour ago was that apparently the entire movie got leaked online three weeks before its release. According to Variety, as of July 27, there’s been 1.13 million illegal downloads of Expendables 3 worldwide!!

Though I hated the first movie, and I’ve only seen the Chuck Norris part of the 2nd movie, part of me actually still curious to check this one. So *maybe* I’ll go to a matinee showing 😉 After all Wesley Snipes is back! I’m curious to see this just for him, plus we’ve got Harrison Ford & Mel Gibson!

This week I’ll be going to Sin City 2: Dame to Kill For screening on Tuesday. Boy it’s been almost a decade since the first movie was released. I barely remember what it’s all about but I do remember liking the visual style.


So that’s it for the roundup. What did YOU see? Anything good?

Top 10 Favorite Scottish Actors

Today’s Gerry Butler’s birthday. For the past three years I’ve been making all kinds of tribute posts to my former crush. But y’know what, I don’t think any of you would be surprised that I won’t be doing a tribute for him this year, instead, I figure I’d finish the list that’s been sitting dormant in my draft folder for some time. I was originally going to post this shortly after I posted my picks of Top 10 Favorite Irish Actors which was three years ago!

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As you know, I have a penchant for the Scots. But really, can you blame me? There’s got to be something in the water in Scotland that churn out an endless supply of talented, AND handsome blokes. To top it off, they seem to have a charming personality to go with ’em too, and of course, there’s the irresistible Scottish burr. I’d say there aren’t enough Scots working in Hollywood right now, especially since Connery’s been out of the game for some time. In any case, here are my current faves right now in alphabetical order [Yes Gerry, you’re still on the list… for now] 😀

Billy Connoly

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I’ve only seen him in a few movies but some have become my favorites. Love him in Mrs. Brown alongside Judi Dench, in Dustin Hoffman’s debut Quartet, as well as his voice work in the recent Pixar feature film BRAVE. He’s got such a charming but mischievous personality that I often associate with Scottish men.

Brian Cox

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Brian Cox is easily of the most underrated actors working today. It’s one of those actors you wonder why he hasn’t gotten an Oscar yet given his consistently excellent performance. Even in small roles, it’s hard not to be impressed by the Dundee-born actor, i.e. The Bourne Supremacy, Rob Roy, X-Men 2Red, etc. I even like his performance as Hannibal Lecter in Manhunter more than Anthony Hopkins’ in The Silence of the Lambs.

Craig Ferguson

CraigFerguson

Ok so now he’s switched to be a talk show host on CBS, but Ferguson is quite a great comic and voice actor. He was a hoot in Saving Grace with Brenda Blethyn, a hilarious British crime comedy. I also enjoy his voice work in How To Train Your Dragon as well as Brave, and once in a while I’d tune in to The Late, Late Show and watch his gregarious monologue and hysterical interviews!

Dougray Scott

DougrayScott

I think a lot of moviegoers probably only know him from Mission Impossible II or as the actor who missed out on the role of Wolverine in the X-Men franchise. But he’s actually a pretty good actor. I like him as the Handsome Prince in Ever After, as well as in smaller movies like Enigma and Ripley’s Game. Who knows, his breakthrough role could be just around the corner.

Ewan McGregor

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Perhaps the most prolific Scottish actor in Hollywood today, McGregor is as hard working as he is talented. He’s quite versatile as well, playing different types of roles and moving from one genre to the next. Just this year alone he was in The Impossible, Jack The Giant Slayer and August: Osage County, which couldn’t be more different from each other. He’s also got a beautiful singing voice too, as displayed in Moulin Rouge! I’d totally buy his album if he ever decide to be a recording artist!

Gerard Butler

GerryButler

Ok Gerry, I guess I still have a smidgen of hope that you’d star in something I REALLY want to see again. The ‘Die Hard in the White House’ movie sequel London Has Fallen and that video game movie based on Kane & Lynch aren’t likely to top my must-see list 😦 He did impress me in Coriolanus and Machine Gun Preacher, both of which are grossly overlooked, so he’s still got it in him if the role calls for it. I think he ought to take a page from Matthew McConaughey’s book of career re-invention. I wrote this role for him in an espionage drama with Timothy Dalton as his dad and James McAvoy as his half brother. I’d SO love to see him in an ensemble cast like that by a stellar director, even if he’s only doing a supporting part.

James McAvoy

JamesMcAvoy

I always think that he looks so much like Gerry Butler’s younger brother, but the one with the better acting chops. The first time I saw this Glaswegian native was in The Chronicles of Narnia as Mr. Tumnus, but since then he’s had been on a roll in Hollywood, balancing small/medium indies (The Last Station, Atonement, The Last King of Scotland) to big blockbuster movies like Wanted and X-Men: First Class. He’s also not afraid to take on unsympathetic anti-hero roles, Trance, Welcome to The Punch and Filth, all of which are released this year alone.

Robert Carlyle

RobertCarlyle

Yet another great but underrated Scot. Mr. Carlyle has had an illustrious career since the early 90s. His breakthrough role in Trainspotting got him noticed, and since he’s juggling a TV and film career, some of which don’t seem to deserve his talent [*cough World is Not Enough *cough]. He’s also the best thing in the ABC show Once Upon a Time as Mr. Gold/Rumplestiltskin. Let’s hope he gets more meaty film roles in the near future!

Peter Mullan

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I think I’ve noticed Mr. Mullan in his supporting role in Braveheart, but it was his role in Boy A as a surrogate father to Andrew Garfield that really made me a fan. He’s also memorable in War Horse though his performance is easily overlooked by the younger supporting cast the likes of Tom Hiddleston and Benedict Cumberbatch. I still need to see On a Clear Day and Sunshine on Leith that my Scottish friend Mark Walker highly recommends.

Sean Connery

SeanConnery
Ok so technically he’s retired, but really you can’t have a Favorite Scot list and not mention THE most iconic of them all. Yes the Edinburgh-born actor is the first and to most people, he’s still the best James Bond, but I also like his roles post 007. The Hunt for Red October, Finding Forrester, Rising Sun, Just Cause, The Rock, to name a few, as well as two of my personal favorites: The Untouchables and Indiana Jones & The Last Crusade. He’s not only a distinguished actor, but he’s also got one of the most recognizable accent in all Hollywood.

Honorable Mentions:

  • Billy Boyd
  • David Tennant
  • Iain Glen
  • John Hannah
  • Robbie Coltrane

Now, these five men are talented Scots as well, I just haven’t seen enough of their work to put them on my list. I’d love to see all these actors get more work in Hollywood, especially David Tennant who obviously has got quite a career in British TV. Perhaps that Broadchurch remake would be his American breakthrough. As for Iain Glen, I first saw him in the first Tomb Raider movie and I thought he made a charming villain. He’s also very memorable in BBC’s Spooks, love all his episodes with my Brit crush Richard Armitage! I’ve been slow going catching up with Downton Abbey, but I’m looking forward to seeing Glen’s performance in it, too!


Hope you enjoy my list of great Scots! Who’s YOUR favorite Scottish actor?

FlixChatter Review: Coriolanus (2011)

Coriolanus is one of the renown playwright’s lesser-known works that Ralph Fiennes has played on stage back in 2000. It’s sort of a passion project for him so naturally he knows this character inside and out. For his directorial debut, the British thespian translates the story as a modern wartime film set in a ‘place calling itself Rome.’ So the story is not set in the Italian capital city but a model of an urban war zone complete with tanks, machine guns, and camouflage. The media coverage and TV talking heads reveal a society in turmoil. Grain is scarce and its people impoverished and hungry, unsatisfied by the way the government, particularly its General Caius Martius, treats them.

Fiennes set up the scene using found footage of people looting, rioting, demonstrating, carrying banners of their general with a big red ‘x’ on it. From the exchange between Martius and the people, it’s clear that he has no regard for them. Martius is a warrior, a man of battle, but not exactly a man of nor for the people.

Even in the time he goes to the people to appeal to them and ask for their votes, Martius (who’s now called Coriolanus as an honor following the battle in Corioles) does it reluctantly. He’s not keen on the idea of promoting himself, and the idea of political campaigning repulses him.

The second act is much more politically charged, quite a contrast to the vehemently action-packed first act. The battle scenes between the Romans and the Volscian army, led by Tulus Aufidius (Gerard Butler) are reminiscent of The Hurt Locker as it shares the same choreographer, Oscar-winner Barry Ackroyd. The knife fight between the two arch nemesis is brutal and very, very bloody.

Just like most of Shakespeare’s work, its hero shares complicated relationship with the people around him. His relationship with his mother Volumnia is one of the film’s major themes, brought to life by a pair of strong stage performers, Fiennes and the great Vanessa Redgrave. A conversation with Martius’ wife reveals that Volumnia has raised her son as a soldier that bred such an extreme conviction on his part…

Had I a dozen sons, I had rather eleven die nobly for their country than one voluptuously surfeit out of action

The person who believes in Martius the most is Senator Menenius (Brian Cox), he’s practically his biggest cheerleader in his quest for political life. But the rest of the senate, led by the two Tribunes Brutus and Sicinius, rally against him and their schemes of manipulating the crowd gets Martius banished from the city.

From then on, what follows is the electrifying scenes between Coriolanus and Aufidius, as he appeals to fight Rome together with the Volscian army. The two sworn enemies hate each other, surely, but there is deep mutual admiration between the two. Aufidius is perhaps the kind of leader Coriolanus wishes to be as he’s courageous, but also loved by his men and his people. The homoerotic undertones is quite palpable here, and Fiennes revealed in the commentary (and in this article) that it’s what Shakespeare intended it to be, though more to suggest an obsession than a literal romantic attraction.

The political relevance of the world we’re in today and all the maneuvering and manipulation that’s going on is as thrilling as the action. Fiennes has proven himself a capable director here, surrounding himself with a massively talented cast and crew, starting with John Logan (Gladiator, Hugo) developing a taut script, and filming on locations in Serbia under Ackroyd’s capable hands as a cinematographer.

He’s also able to cajole great performances from his cast, and he’s assembled a wonderful set of actors to do the job. The critics praised Redgrave’s performance left and right. Indeed she was marvelous and also Jessica Chastain in a small role as Coriolanus’ wife, but I was mostly taken by Brian Cox’s performance as the seasoned politician Menenius. How this Scottish thespian has never been nominated for an Oscar is a travesty. “Coriolanus has grown from man to dragon…” his character said in one heart-wrenching scene, and it’s palpable that Coriolanus’ betrayal cuts deep into his soul.

Fiennes himself is at his most effective, delivering his lines with sheer clarity and intelligence. Coriolanus is a tough character to sympathize with, but Fiennes gives a fascinating look into a flawed antihero. He’s also chosen the perfect actor as his adversary. In interviews Fiennes said that he had wanted a ‘warrior’ to play Aufidius and who could be more fitting than King Leonidas himself. But just like in 300, Butler is just as efficient in the action scenes as in those that demand emotional intensity. The highlights in the film are no doubt the fierce face/off between Fiennes and Butler and the two men seem to relish in them. The knife fight apparently took two days to film and it’s as cutthroat as one can get. There’s barely any music playing during a lot of the action scenes, it feels authentically gritty and realistic, almost documentary-like at times but without the overused hand-held style.

My only gripe is that the scenes between the politicians and the people often feel overly-simplified. I understand that the timeline perhaps isn’t as swift as depicted in the film, but it just feels like thing happen way too fast how Coriolanus goes from hero to scorn exile. I’m not too keen with James Nesbitt’s performance either as one of the tribunes, he feels somewhat miscast in this role. The scenes of the Roman politicians with the crowd also didn’t seem to work as well, perhaps it’s more suitable for stage performance but it just didn’t feel right on film. Coriolanus as a character also isn’t as compelling because there’s barely any reflective moments that gives us insights into his motivations and why he despise the people the way he does.

Those are minor quibbles however, I thoroughly enjoyed this film, and apart from the first act and the very last scene, it’s thankfully not as violent as I had thought. The use of Shakespearean language in modern setting is tricky but I think Fiennes and the cast pulled it off brilliantly. It feels a bit odd at first but after a while I enjoyed listening to it. I’m glad I ended up watching this on Blu-ray so I can turn on the caption however, as it helps me grasp the story a lot better.

Final Thoughts: If you’re looking for an intriguing political thriller filled with great performances, then this is the film for you. Once you get past the Shakespearean language, it’s surprisingly accessible and its themes are eerily relevant to our world today.

It’s been nearly two years since I first heard about Ralph Fiennes’ passion project. Well, after appearing in my most-anticipated list for TWO years in a row, I finally bought the Blu-ray. I’ve actually watched it twice, one with Fiennes’ commentary and one without. If only the special features had been more robust though, it’d be nice if it had more scenes of the on-location shoot in Serbia like I talked about here. Still, it’s certainly well worth the purchase.

4 out of 5 reels


Have you seen CORIOLANUS? Do share your thoughts on the film.

FlixChatter Review: Michael Mann’s Manhunter (1986)

This is the first film where the famous character of Hannibal Lecter (spelled as ‘Lecktor’ in this film), the brilliant psychiatrist and cannibalistic serial killer, first appeared on screen. The story is based on Thomas Harris’ novel called Red Dragon. I was curious because of that fact and also because I generally like Michael Mann’s work. It’s also fun to see William Petersen in a similar role of that in his CSI TV show as he’s the protagonist in the film, kind of like Clarice Starling in this film’s sequel The Silence of the Lamb.

Petersen plays Wil Graham, an FBI profiler who uses a unique method of getting into the criminal’s mind in order to catch him. Such a process is effective but obviously takes so much out of him, and also endangers his family’s safety. In fact, after he was attacked by Lecter, Graham retired to Florida. Lecter is now in jail but his former colleague Jack Crawford (Dennis Farina) asked him to help with yet another serial killer case, dubbed the ‘Tooth Fairy’ by the police for his signature bite marks he left on the victims.

The opening sequence is downright eerie, with the killer entering a family’s house late at night and shines a flashlight on the couple sleeping on their bed. He zooms in on the female victim for a few minutes waiting for her to wake up. All of the violence happens off-screen, which is the way I prefer it, because we don’t really need to see all the gory happenings in order to feel the impact of the crime. We get to see it when Graham finally agrees to take the case and he pays a visit to the house. Blood splatters all over the room, on the bed, on the wall and the smashed-up mirror graphically depicts just how gruesome the attack was on this poor family. But what’s more disturbing is the constant play of the home video of the family enjoying themselves during breakfast and also frolicking by the pool. Even without knowing who they are, we get this incredible sense of distress as Graham did when he first saw their pictures. That’s why he couldn’t say no to the case.

Another reason I wanted to see this film is the massively-underrated Scottish thespian Brian Cox as Lecter. He’s not in the movie very much, but when he is, he’s very, very good. I kind of like his portrayal and I wish he’d reprise his role in subsequent movies. Sure Anthony Hopkins won an Oscar for his role in the sequel, and it’s become the role he’s most known for, but I think Cox’s nuanced, less-revealing performance is equally spine-chilling (if not more so) and we haven’t even got to him eating liver with chianti and stuff! Mann effectively showed just how menacing and creepy Hannibal is from Graham reaction after his visit to his jail cell. He runs off like there’s no tomorrow as if Hannibal is right behind him with a scalpel, even though he didn’t even touch the man at all the entire time! Per Wiki, Mann kept the role of Lecktor very short, believing that it was “such a charismatic character that [he] wanted the audience almost not to get enough of him” I think that’s a wise decision.

The rest of the performances are good as well. Petersen is convincing as the gifted profiler, though not too different from his famous TV role in CSI. Tom Noonan is downright creepy even when he displays his childlike innocence with Joan Allen, in a brief but memorable role as a blind woman drawn to a psychopath.

I LOVE Mann’s direction here, I think the quiet intensity he displayed here is most similar to The Insider. It proves that you don’t need big explosions or excessive display of blood and gore to create a sense of suspense and dread. Some people might think this is overly slow with not much going on, but I kind of like the fact that this movie gradually explores the psyche of the mind-hunter and the journey to catching the killer. The use of colors, contrasting dark vs. light shots and fully utilizing music to enhance the atmosphere is quintessentially Mann’s. The level of authenticity is great as well, though of course, being this set in mid 80s, the movie doesn’t age well. It’s a hoot to see just how ‘archaic’ VHS is, but I’m sure our Blu-ray and iPhone would be just as dated a few decades from now, ahah.

But to me, there’s a lot going for it here that makes this one of Mann’s finest work. In fact, I like this better than the more celebrated Silence of the Lambs and I don’t really have interest in seeing the remake made in 2002 with the same name as Harris’ novel.

4 out of 5 reels


Have you seen this movie? Who do you think is the better Hannibal actor?

THIS JUST IN! ‘Coriolanus’ Trailer starring Ralph Fiennes & Gerard Butler

WAHOO!! What have we got here! I’ve been waiting for this movie from Fall of 2009 when Gerard Butler was first cast, and finally today we’ve got a trailer! I’ve blogged about it many times before, and even posted some behind-the-scenes pics from Serbia, as well as a guest review from BERLINALE earlier this year.

CORIOLANUS is a modern retelling of a Shakespeare political play, Ralph Fiennes directs and stars in the title role as the banished hero of Rome who allies with a sworn enemy Tullus Aufidius (Gerard Butler) to take his revenge on the city. The rest of the cast includes Vanessa Redgrave, Brian Cox, James Nesbitt and Jessica Chastain from a script by John Logan (Gladiator, Last Samurai, The Aviator).

So I won’t keep you waiting any longer, take a look:

WOW, that was intense!! I guess from some of the movie stills I saw months ago, I knew it’s going to be pretty bloody, and it’s quite eerie to watch given what’s been going on in England. I am so stoked to see this, and I expect great performances from everyone involved. “Coriolanus is grown from man… to dragon.” Yikes, that’s about sums up just the extend of Coriolanus’ lunacy that even his mother has no choice but disowns him.

Just a bit of trivia, though it’s one of the least known work from Shakespeare, both Fiennes and Butler have played Coriolanus on stage before, though this time Butler will be playing the nemesis. Fiennes’ decision to set it in contemporary setting but use the classic dialog is going to be interesting to see. It’s perhaps not the most ‘accessible’ films but given the stellar cast and the relevant subject matter, this is definitely one to watch for the big screen!  I hope this will be playing near me come December 2nd, 2011.


Well, what do you think, folks? Intrigued?