FlixChatter Review: UNCLE FRANK (2020)

I had the privilege of seeing this film at Twin Cities Film Fest last October, one of the three films I saw on the big screen. I had come into it blindly, not having seen a trailer or even read in details what it’s about at all or even seen the trailer. I find that as a rarity in the age of social media where incessant promotional campaign tend to reveal too much about a film. So for this review, I shall try not to spoil too much details about the plot, and when I absolutely have to, I’ll warn you about it and hide the spoiler-y bits.

Sophia Lillis as Beth

Now, even reading its description on IMDb would reveal key details about the plot, so if you want to come into it blindly, I’d refrain from going to its IMDb page. What I can safely tell you is that the film takes place in early 1970s in South Carolina and later New York City. It’s told through the eyes of the title character Frank Bledsoe’s (Paul Bettany) teenage niece Beth (Sophia Lillis) who clearly admires his uncle and claims he’s the only one in the family who sees and appreciates her for who she is.

We first see the Bledsoe’s family at a Christmas family gathering and while everyone seems to treat Frank well, it’s apparent right away that Frank is dismissed by his dad, the family patriarch referred to as Daddy Mac. At first it’s not clear why he isn’t quite welcomed at home and my initial thought is that the family isn’t too keen that he left the South to work as a literature professor at NYU.

Paul Bettany as Uncle Frank

It’s not until 18-year-old Beth ends up going to NYU that Frank’s true identity is revealed. Again I won’t spoil that for you, but it happened at a party at Frank’s apartment where Beth showed up without being invited. The person who shows up at the door is Walid or Wally (Peter Macdissi), Frank’s roommate. He was taken aback by Beth’s presence at first, but immediately warms up to her as if he’s known about her for some time. Now, if you don’t want to know more about the plot, I suggest you stop reading.

The party itself would easily give away just who Frank really is. Spoiler alert (highlight to read) – Beth soon finds out that uncle Frank is gay and he’s been living with his lover Wally for the past 10 years. There are guests of diverse backgrounds mingling, drinking, definitely not the kind of crowds Beth was exposed to in the South. The real journey began when Frank got a call that Daddy Mac has died and he had to take a road trip from Manhattan to Creekville, SC for his funeral. College is naturally a coming-of-age moment for many teens, but this road trip and all the revelations concerning Frank, as well as the reactions stemming from that, ends up being a growing experience for both involved.

This film is a sophomore effort from award-winning writer Alan Ball (American Beauty, Six Feet Under, True Blood). He also penned the script, which apparently is partly based on his own dad’s life. I have to commend Ball’s ability to balance the drama, comedy and even tragedy aspects of the story as the film takes viewers in an emotional roller coaster. I always admire filmmakers who can tackle difficult subject matters and manage to inject humor into it without turning it into an absurd farce.  This one definitely covers tricky topics and sensitive, hot button issues, yet it’s not a downer of a movie despite some harrowing scenes.

Throughout the journey south, there are multiple flashback scenes told in stages as more and more of Frank’s past is revealed. This narrative style could’ve been really clunky and problematic, yet it works quite well here to tell the source of why Frank is so ravaged with guilt and the incident that changed his relationship with his father forever. I think the lack of subtlety is deliberate, though some of the scenes and dialogue are too on-the-nose and forced emotionally. Despite the inherent conflict between Frank and his dad, however, I appreciate the fact that Ball refrains from completely demonizing him despite the intense hurt he’s caused his own son.

The performances are definitely the film’s strong suit. Paul Bettany is quite a revelation as Frank in a committed, genuinely heart-breaking performance. His character is filled with so much sorrow and self-loathing which makes him infuriating and even hard to love, but Bettany tackles the role with a nuanced emotional honesty. Peter Macdissi is simply delightful here in such a warm, lively performance. The stark contrast between the eternal-optimist Wally and the often despondent Frank make for some comic-relief moments that would make you laugh and cry. Sophia Lillis is terrific as Beth and I think the fact that the film is often seen through her perspective makes the story more relatable. The supporting cast are filled with talented character actors such as Margo Martindale, Steve Zahn, Stephen Root, Judy Greer, and Lois Smith. I rarely see Root play such an unsympathetic character but he’s quite believable here as the insensitive patriarch.

I think the biggest issue I have with this film is that at times it feels like an ‘agenda film’ that tries to blatantly push certain values to the audience. Some of the familial scenes and Frank’s alcoholism feel a tad too maudlin and ham-fisted. Overall though, it’s a compelling and emotional drama that would definitely spark interesting conversations with people after you watch it. Definitely a perfect release around Thanksgiving, even if this year people might have to spend family gatherings virtually.


Have you seen UNCLE FRANK? Well, what did you think?

TCFF 2018 Interviews: Steve Zahn


Not everyday I got the opportunity one of my favorite actors… so imagine my excitement that I got a one-on-one interview with Steve Zahn! I’ve mentioned a bit about Mr. Zahn in my TCFF gala recap last week. A Minnesota native who’ve carved out a fantastic career in Hollywood, Steve is as humble and funny as you’d imagine, no movie star pretense whatsoever and he still looks incredibly young for being 50 years old (in fact he certainly could pass for 35!). Before the interview started, he remarked to me and a rep from Showplace ICON Theatres that it’s ‘f***ing’ bizarre’ to be doing the red carpet, press, etc. as he usually does the glitz and glamor stuff in L.A. and he comes home to Minnesota to be away from all that. He actually stays with his parents while he’s in town, in the same house he grew up in in New Hope (Minneapolis suburbs) instead of at a swanky hotel.

Steve Zahn with his TCFF Lifetime Achievement Award

Once we sat down, I asked him when was the last time he was in MN and he replied ‘A month ago for my 80th birthday.’ Apparently he’s also home every Christmas, splitting his time between his family ranch in Kentucky where he lives with his wife and two teenage kids. I congratulated him on the Lifetime Achievement Award he’s about to receive from TCFF. It’s hard to believe he’s got over 70 projects under his belt listed on IMDb, spanning over two decades since he got his big break in Reality Bites in 1994. One of Hollywood’s best and most versatile actor, he’s a self-described character actor who can easily transition into leading roles. He’s one of those talents who’s great in everything he does. He always stands out and you’d remember him matter how small the role is.

Below is a photo of Steve receiving the award from TCFF’s executive director Jatin Setia last Thursday, Sept.6:

Thanks TCFF photographer Dallas Smith for this awesome photo!

When I mentioned the Lifetime Achievement Award, Steve had this to say… ”As an actor you do one gig and it’s over and you do another. It doesn’t connect, it’s not like it’s a continuous thing. I just got a text from my cousin. She drives snow plows in West Central Minnesota, she’s worked for the state for 30 years and she got a watch. I mean it doesn’t happen in my business. So it’s weird to look back at things you did that you think they don’t connect but they do connect in a weird way.”

 You got started doing theatre work here in Minnesota and New York City. Do you miss doing theatre work?

Oh yeah, absolutely. For me, it’s weird because of where I live, the commitment to theatre would take me away from my family too long. Film commitments are shorter. I can work for three months, and you can come home during that time and then I’m done. As opposed to theatre commitments which is like 8 shows a week and one day off. For me it’s more logistics and family [that prevents him from doing more theatre work].

Steve with Ethan Hawke in the 1993 play ‘Sophistry’ – Photo courtesy of Playwrights Horizon

You have been doing a lot of TV work recently (he’s currently filming Valley of the Boom, a docudrama that’ll air on National Geographic focusing on the 1990s tech boom and bust in Silicon Valley). Are you enjoying that?

Well yes, both TV and film. It’s the trend of the business, the TV medium has expanded beyond belief. Writers have gone from film to tv to tell these intricate, character-driven stories. It used to be the opposite when films are the ones doing that, so it’s interesting to see the change. There was a time when talents sort of get labeled as a ‘TV actor’ so if you want to be a film actor you don’t do TV. It’s totally different now, that stigma is gone completely. For me, I just want to do good stuff, tell good stories with compelling characters. That’s what I look for, I don’t care what the medium is, whether it’s for the small screen or big screen, no matter what the budget is.

You’ve done SO many projects but we don’t have time to go over all of those. I have my favorites you’ve done such as You’ve Got Mail, That Thing You Do!, Shattered Glass… but one I’m curious about is Rescue Dawn. It must be super challenging. How was it working with Werner Herzog?

Oh amazing. He’s an unusual guy but that whole project one of the highlights of my career. Having to physically change and to dive into a character that rigorously. To work with someone that eclectic, y’know, he’s really an interesting guy. Really simple, he was phenomenal. Every day was completely different. The fact that there was no trailers for actors, he doesn’t really like comfort… he loves chaos, he thrives off it, that’s when he’s most creative, not when things are comfortable.

I heard you lost 40 pounds for the role? And this wasn’t a big studio project right, so you must have to have done it on your own?

Oh yeah, Christian [Bale] and I did it for Werner, and because the story was amazing.

Another film I want to ask you about is War For the Planet of the Apes because I love motion-capture (mo-cap). How did you get involved in that project?

I was doing a TV show down in Puerto Rico and [director] Matt Reeves was interested in me playing the part so we have a conversation via Skype for over an hour about Westerns and stuff and he asked me if I would be willing to read for it. So he gave me three days, and I read for him over Skype and he loved it and wanted me to do it. I just said I needed a week at home in between jobs and then I was off in Vancouver running around for a couple of weeks playing an ape. That’s the closest thing that I’ve done to theatre on film, despite the huge budget [$150mil]. It was phenomenal. It was so physical and so difficult and challenging. Mo-cap captures your performance. It doesn’t make you an ape, it makes you look like an ape. So if you don’t move like one, you’re not going to look like one.

Down to the tiniest movement, you’d have to analyze how an ape behaves. We [humans] have a lot of pretense, we hold ourselves a certain way. But apes don’t do that. When we look at something, we do it in such a way, but apes do it totally differently. So you have to embody that, then forget about it so you have to be able to play a character with emotions.

Did you work with the ‘King of Mo-Cap’ Andy Serkis who played Caesar in the ‘Apes’ franchise?

Oh yeah he’s amazing. I really think Andy should’ve been nominated for an Oscar. I mean I voted for him when it was award season, it’s really difficult work. It’s harder than playing a regular cop, ‘cause now you have to play a cop that’s an ape, for example. If it weren’t for my theatre background, I really don’t think I would’ve been able to do that job.

In your illustrious career, you’ve worked with SO many people. Which of your co-stars you’d love to work with again?

Oh man, there’s so many. Ethan Hawke is a good friend of mine, all he has to do is call. Richard Linklater. Sam Rockwell, oh too many to mention.

Speaking of Ethan Hawke who’s gone into directing more and more. Is that something you would like to tackle in the future?

I don’t know. I’m not as bold… he’s an amazing artist. I mean, if there’s something I’m really passionate about, yeah maybe.

Last question. You mentioned that you lived in Kentucky, which is far from Hollywood. Is that a deliberate choice that you want to have a work and life balance?

No. It’s just another passion in life [to live as a rancher]. Even when I was doing theatre in New York I was living in a cabin in Pennsylvania. I always enjoy living outside, outdoors, I just enjoy that. I hunt, fish, farm, that’s who I am. Yet indirectly, as I get older, I think it’s nice to be able to go from one extreme to the other, that is the contrast of working in Hollywood and living in a ranch. I think it helps me as an artist. It may not be the best for someone else but for me it’s perfect. It keeps me ‘naïve’ and every time I go to every job it feels fresh, like the first time. I’m always on location in a way, I never work at home.


Soon after our interview, Steve was whisked away to the Rooftop Bar at AC Marriott Hotel. But thanks to TCFF Managing Director Bill Cooper who took the time to snap this photo of us before he left.

Thank you Steve Zahn for taking the time to chat with me… and Jatin Setia & Bill Cooper for the opportunity!


So what’s YOUR favorite Steve Zahn role(s)?

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Twin Cities Film Fest’s 2018 Preview Gala Recap + Meeting Steve Zahn

Whew!! What a night!! Thank God it’s Friday ’cause I’m still reeling from the festivities of last night’s event. I’ve mentioned in this post that Steve Zahn was TCFF’s honored guest and the recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award. With 70+ TV/Film works under his belt in his illustrious career, he certainly deserves it!!

I was lucky enough to get a 15-minute interview with Steve just before the Meet & Greet with him at AC Marriot Rooftop Bar Thursday night. Thanks to Jatin Setia (Executive Director) and Bill Cooper (Managing Director) for this amazing opportunity!

I’ll post the interview once I finished transcribing it next week, but let me just say it was truly fun AND inspiring to have a one-on-one chat with the super talented MN-native who remains down-to-earth and kind despite his Hollywood success. We chatted about his theatre background, training at Harvard’s prestigious American Repertory Theater program, before being discovered by Ben Stiler on a NYC play (Sophistry) he did with Ethan Hawke. The play landed both him and Hawke roles in Reality Bites in 1994.

We then talked about some of the highlights of his film career, including working with Christian Bale and Werner Herzog in Rescue Dawn and doing mo-cap acting with Andy Serkis in War for the Planet of the Apes. Bad Ape is one of the highlights of that movie for me, and so it was so much fun to see his eyes light up talking about the experience. I too agree with Steve that Serkis deserved an Oscar for his mo-cap acting work!

Check out this video showing clips from dozens of Steve’s movies and tv work:

This year’s Preview Gala was even more festive as the year before, and I LOVE that they converted the ‘stage’ area into an elegant talk-show setting where the JASON Show host Jason Matheson interviewed Steve prior to the award presentation. Steve was his usual charming and funny self, being ever-so-humble and gracious about his career and even thanking his family and friends/mentors who have helped him along the way.

It was truly a fantastic event which made me all the more blessed and grateful to have been a part of TCFF since year one nine years ago!! This relatively young organization has brought SO much to the Twin Cities community, not just the film community but other non-profit organizations promoting and benefiting SO many social causes. Last night there were even puppies from Secondhand Hounds Animal Rescue Organization along with TCFF annual Silent Auction!

Jatin Setia’s FB post from this AM encapsulated everything about last night’s event…

Here are some pics of the festivities… wish I had been able to play with the puppies but I was busy registering guests at the check-in table. I had a blast volunteering with my friends last night, some of whom I’d be hanging out a ton during TCFF in October, yay!


While you’re at it, check out the brand spanking new TCFF website… check it often so you won’t miss any of the news and highlights!


So yeah, TCFF 2018… here. we. go!

Twin Cities Film Fest Fall Preview Gala 2018 kicks off September 6 w/ special guest Steve Zahn!

The Twin Cities Film Fest is thrilled to announce that acclaimed actor and Minnesota native Steve Zahn will be the recipient of this year’s Lifetime Achievement Award, presented each year at the organization’s annual Festival Preview Gala which kicks off the new TCFF season.

Limited tickets is available here for the Thursday, Sept 6. dinner;  all proceeds go to the organization to support expanded programming and educational events.

Over the past 25 years, Zahn has amassed an unforgettable body of work, appearing in some of the most iconic and critically-acclaimed films of his time. From “Reality Bites” to “That Thing You Do!”, “Out of Sight,” “Shattered Glass,” “Rescue Dawn,” “War for Planet of the Apes,” “Dallas Buyers Club,” and more recently “Valley of the Boom” and “Captain Fantastic,” TCFF organizers cited the range and diversity of his work in bestowing him with this year’s top honor.

“Steve Zahn is one of the most talented, successful and recognizable actors working in Hollywood today,” said TCFF Executive Director Jatin Setia. “We’re so honored to be able to celebrate a Minnesota son who has run so far with his talents, and left such an indelible mark on today’s movie industry.”

In this article in Star Tribune, Zahn says that he doesn’t feel like he’s ready to accept a lifetime achievement award. But I think he deserves it and he’s definitely a much more versatile actor than people give him credit for. Can’t believe he’s been acting for 25 years (and that he’s 50 years old! He doesn’t look a day over 35!)  I enjoyed his performance in That Thing You Do!, Forces of Nature, You’ve Got Mail, Shattered Glass, Captain Fantastic, and even his voice work in War for the Planet of the Apes as the hilarious Bad Ape. He’s got such a charming likability about him that is instantaneous,  and like his That Thing You Do! director Tom Hanks, he’s got that ‘everyman’ quality about him.

I for one can’t wait to see Mr. Zahn and hopefully get to meet him in person and thank him for entertaining us all these years!


GALA DETAILS

The Festival Preview Gala, hosted this year at the Metropolitan Ballroom, is TCFF’s annual industry celebration, fundraiser and unveiling of the new film festival schedule. The program includes dinner, drinks, red carpet, silent auction, honors and select trailers for films that will screen at this October’s festival. Zahn and other honorees will be in attendance to receive their awards.

Steve will be interviewed by local TV & Radio personality Jason Matheson for an intimate reflection on his inspiring body of work. Shannon Paul will emcee the evening with her hilarious banter as your favorite cinematic non-profit reveals TCFF 2018’s most anticipated films premiering this at October’s festival, followed by an intimate evening with Steve Zahn.

6pm-7pm:
Reception
Silent Auction
Red Carpet
Live Music

7:30pm:
Dinner
Previews & Giving- Emceed by Miss Shannan Paul
Retrospective with Steve Zahn- Hosted by Jason Matheson

GET TICKETS »

VIP Table – $1,500 (seats 8 guests)
Table Host – $1,000 (seats 8 guests)
Individual Dinner – $150
General Admission – $40 (non-dinner option)

MEAL OPTIONS:

  • Option 1: Chicken Breast w/Dried Cherry Sauce on Potato Puree & Green Beans w/sweet peppers
  • Option 2: Saffron Pappardelle Pasta with Oven-Roasted Tomatoes, Artichokes and Wild Mushrooms

LOCATION:

The Metropolitan Ballroom
5418 Wayzata Blvd
Minneapolis, MN 55416


 

FlixChatter Review: Captain Fantastic (2016)

captainfantastic

The title of the film may sound like a superhero film but this indie drama is as far away from the ubiquitous genre as it can get. It made me think of The Sound of Music if Captain Von Trapp were to uproot his entire family to the Austrian Alps and homeschooled all his kids instead of hiring Maria.

Set in the forests of the Pacific Northwest, Ben Cash has been living off the grid with his six kids. The film opened with a deer hunting scene that’s quite graphic and intense, prompting the woman next to me to leave the theater and never came back. Perhaps she’s an animal lover or something, but I think it’s her loss that she missed out on this film because of it.

captainfantastic_training

It’s a provocative way to open a film, and an effective one as well as we get to see right away how Ben has raised his kids, Bodevan, Kielyr, Vespyr, Rellian, Zaja and Nai, with vigorous physical and mental training. They live their lives without any of the conveniences and daily luxuries most kids in modern society won’t be able to survive even for a day. Though the kids don’t follow common academic curriculum, they’re taught to be critical thinkers. Instead of playing video games or lying around listening to music all day, the Cash kids read books, play music, hunt for food, and actually spend time with each other.

It’s a really fascinating slice of an unorthodox life, anchored by a soulful yet physical role by Viggo Mortensen. There are numerous themes that are explored here. Parenting is a big one, and I think every parents (especially in America) would benefit from watching this. The scene when the Cash family visit their conventional aunt and uncle in the city (played by Kathryn Hahn and Steve Zahn), it shows a stark contrast of how their respective kids are brought up. The Cash kids are well-versed in the the Bill of Rights and know who Karl Marx is, while their cousins are far more knowledgeable about pop culture. If I were a parent, it certainly would make me ponder just how much (or I should say how little) kids are learning in school!

captainfantastic_visit

Their lives take an unexpected turn with news of the death of Ben’s wife, Leslie. It’s not a spoiler to reveal that because that even it the catalyst to the journey the Cash family had to take. Ben didn’t spare their feelings when he revealed the news, and it’s certainly a poignant moment that’s beautifully portrayed. The Cash family have to leave their idyllic existence in order to attend Leslie’s funeral, and in the course of that journey, Ben is challenged with the idea what it really means to be a parent and brings into question all his philosophies/beliefs he’s taught his kids.

Now, one does not have to subscribe to his worldview to emphasize with Ben. I for one don’t see eye to eye with him on a spiritual level. Instead of Christmas, they celebrate Noam Chomsky Day. He also vehemently opposes Christian funeral traditions, claiming that his wife had become a Buddhist believer and would rather be cremated instead. Now, while one might admire Ben’s parenting style and what his kids accomplished, no doubt they’d run into issues given that they’ve lived such a sheltered life and away from society. The kids are respectful and bright, but lacking in common social graces. “You made us freaks!” one of the kids, Rellian (Nicholas Hamilton), screamed at Ben. He’s got a point there and the film shows many examples of that. The scene where the eldest Bodevan (George MacKay) promptly proposes to a girl after kissing her at an RV campground is funny but rather sad as well. The film is peppered with funny and amusing moments, but a lot of the humor isn’t slapstick but laden with irony and poignancy.

captainfantastic_kids

The themes of parenting and coming-of-age blend seamlessly, and in a way it’s a coming-of-age of sort for Ben as well as a father. The main conflict arises between Ben and his father in-law Jack (Frank Langella), who sternly opposes Ben’s way of life and how his grandchildren are raised. It seems at first that Jack is painted as the *villain* of the film that threatens to separate the kids from their father, but fortunately the film isn’t so simplistic. Liberal sensibilities seem to prevail here, but writer/director Matt Ross doesn’t present things in a formulaic way, and there’s a vast thought-provoking themes being explored here. He boldly presents a compelling yet flawed hero, and chose an absolutely perfect actor in Viggo to do the job.

He’s the epitome of intellectual free spirit, a Renaissance man who’s set in his ways. The intensely charismatic Viggo Mortensen bared all for the role, mentally and physically. I’d hope to see his name popping up in the Best Actor race come award season. There’s a rather amusing nude scene, made more hilarious by the reaction of the people who saw him being so nonchalant about it, as if it’s the most natural thing in the world. The challenge to normalcy seems to be what the whole movie is about, and it certainly gives you plenty of food for thought.

captainfantastic_viggo

The movie works largely because of the talented cast. In addition to MacKay and Hamilton, we’ve got Samantha Isler, Annalise Basso, Shree Crooks and Charlie Shotwell as the talented young actors who play Ben’s children. Each have their moments to shine and you believe them as a close-knit family. The only thing I wish were explored a bit better is the relationship between Ben and Leslie. The only flashback scenes we get are mere glimpses of the two gazing lovingly at each other, which doesn’t reveal anything about Leslie’s mental condition or suicidal tendencies.

It’s been a couple of months since I saw Captain Fantastic, which was my JULY Movie of the Month AND it’s also one of my fave 2016 films so far. It’s a beautifully-shot film with panoramic shots of the Pacific Oceans and the Rocky Mountains region. Certainly a film that subscribe to the old adage that it’s the journey, not the destination that really matters. It’s certainly one of the most eccentric films I’ve seen this year, both amusing and haunting, but definitely indelible.

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Have you seen ‘Captain Fantastic’? Let me know what you think! 

Seven talented actors who deserve more leading roles

Underrated, under-appreciated, criminally-overlooked, call it what you will but the fact of the matter is, these actors deserve better! They are constantly relegated to supporting roles, and worse, playing second fiddle to actors whose talent aren’t even on par. Yet time and time again they almost always overshadow the lead with their charisma and on-screen presence, which make you wish they had been given more screen time. With that in mind, here are seven fine actors who not only deserve it, but are more than capable to carry a movie on their own:

  1. Rufus Sewell
    Yes, yes I know, predictable aren’t I? But seriously, the reason I mention this Brit a bazillion times in my blog is because he just doesn’t get enough recognition in Hollywood. I mean, you already know how I felt about his involvement… or lack thereof, in The Tourist. Nothing against Johnny Depp but I certainly think Rufus can do an equally smashing job in his place. He usually steal scenes in practically every movie he’s in anyway (as my buddy Prairiegirl outlined in her b’day tribute), why not just let him ‘own’ the whole darn thing? As Roisin from Sundryanco Blog said in her brilliant comment, “Who needs the former two, when you’ve got two acting legends.” Hear, hear!
  2. Minnie Driver
    I’ve been a fan of Minnie since her excellent turn in Circle of Friends. There’s an inherent likability about the London-based actress that it’s so easy to root for her. She makes for an engaging and lovely leading lady in Return to Me, which unsurprisingly is a rom-com most people have overlooked. I also love her comical role as the egotistical Carlotta in Phantom of the Opera. She had a brief stint in the acclaimed TV series The Riches with Eddie Izzard, and was seen recently in Conviction. I’d love to see her get one of Jennifer Aniston’s roles for once, as it’s likely going to be a more watchable movie with her in it.
  3. Jamie Bell
    The ‘playing second fiddle’ comment I said above was pretty much dedicated to this 24-year-old Brit, particularly in the movie Jumper. Even just from the trailer, you could tell he’s the better actor than Hayden Christensen (though to be fair, Christensen was quite good in Life As a House). The BAFTA-winning actor does get the lead role in the British indie Mister Foe, but in Hollywood, he seems to be relegated to supporting roles, i.e. in The Eagle (whilst the beefcake with feeble talent Channing Tatum got the lead) and later in Sam Worthington’s thriller Man on Ledge. He’ll be starring in Tintin and Jane Eyre both due out next year, and hopefully more lead roles are in store for him in the future.
  4. Marisa Tomei
    She won an Oscar nearly 2 decades ago for her supporting role in My Cousin Vinny, but since then she never seems to be ‘upgraded’ to leading lady status. Sure, many of her supporting turn are quite memorable and has won accolades (i.e. What Women WantThe Wrestler), but I’m curious what she’d do if she’s given a chance to ‘carry’ a movie on her own. She seems to have a knack for playing women with emotional issues, but she’s always comes across endearing, not annoying. I’d think she’d be a good option for roles that normally go to Julia Roberts or Sandra Bullock, as she’s obviously as equally attractive and talented as those two movie stars.
  5. Sophia Myles
    Most of you probably have no idea who she is, but her face probably looks familiar to you. She’s one half of Tristan + Isolde as James Franco’s besotted lover and most recently was in Outlander as Jim Caviezel’s love interest. I first saw her in Mansfield Park and remembered her for her uncanny resemblance to Kate Winslet. But her excellent turn as Beth in the prematurely-canceled vampire show Moonlight is really one of the best thing of the series that made me wonder why Hollywood hasn’t quite ‘discovered’ her. I guess she’s got a pretty good gig right now in BBC’s seriesMI-5 alongside Richard Armitage, but with her talent and beauty, she could easily play roles that would’ve gone to Scarlett Johansson or Michelle Williams.
  6. Steve Zahn
    I just realized Zahn is a Minnesota-native, but that’s not exactly the reason for his inclusion. Known mostly for playing the ‘funny best friend,’ Zahn is so much more capable than that and has proven he’s got range in Werner Herzog’s Rescue Dawn. He’s also willing to suffer for his art, a la his co-star Christian Bale, as he lost 40 pounds for the role in that movie. His affable and naturally um, zany personality makes him so fun to watch (i.e. he makes Sahara more bearable, probably even more so if he had as much screen time as Matthew McConaughey!). I’m hoping that his moment to shine isn’t too far away in the horizon.
  7. Matthew Goode
    You’d think someone with his good looks would have no trouble finding lead roles in Hollywood. But Goode is much more than mere eye candy, which makes it all the more frustrating when he’s underutilized as the love interest in a vapid rom-com (read: Leap Year). Lately he’s all over the net as the rumor mill was working overtime in placing him as yet another possible contender for Superman. You already know who I think would be perfect for the role, but the tall, dark haired Brit as a superhero is an idea I can get behind 🙂 Of course I’d rather see him play various characters, and I’d think he’s poised to take over any role that’d normally go to the overworked (and overused) Ryan Reynolds or Sam Worthington.

Btw, you’re probably wondering why I didn’t put Timothy Dalton on this list, but I think I’ve made my feeling about him quite known all over this blog and especially this post. Besides, I’m planning on creating a dedicated list for seasoned actor of his stature sometime in the future.


Well, do you agree/disagree with my list? And while you’re at it, do share which actor(s) you think deserve to get top billing for a change.