FlixChatter Review – CENTIGRADE (2020)

The Merriam-Webster online dictionary defines centigrade as “relating to, conforming to, or having a thermometric scale on which the interval between the freezing point of water and the boiling point of water is divided into 100 degrees with 0° representing the freezing point and 100° the boiling point 10°.”

So this definition made sense when I clicked on the link to watch the new IFC Midnight movie Centigrade, directed by Brendan Walsh, who is making his feature directorial debut after working previously on numerous television series such as Nurse Jackie. Water, mostly at its freezing point, takes center stage in the movie, starring Vincent Piazza (Jersey Boys) and Genesis Rodriguez (Man On A Ledge). The survival thriller takes place in the year 2002, when a young American couple, Matthew and Naomi, travel to the arctic mountains of Norway.

Naomi is eight months pregnant and very moody, being in Norway to promote her book tour with her husband Matt. Just prior to the start of the movie, the couple is said to be driving back to their hotel, when they decide to pull over during a bad ice storm/snowstorm. The movie starts as Naomi wakes up the next morning and quickly realizes that she and Matt are trapped in their SUV, buried underneath layers of snow and ice. Matt quickly assesses that they only have a minimal amount of food and water, with a small survival pack in the SUV trunk, consisting of several candles and matches. Naomi also has a cellphone, but it doesn’t pick up a signal and is almost out of battery.

Both Matt and Naomi do their best to stay calm, but they occasionally have arguments, mostly related to Naomi’s pregnancy and their decision to pull over the side of the road to ride out the storm. But as time goes on, they also argue about their strategy to get out and what the best way to survive their situation is. One time Naomi forgets to tightly put on the cap of their only water bottle and some of it spills out, unleashing an outburst from Matt which quickly deescalates as both realize there is nothing to be gained from their argument. As Naomi’s pregnancy quickly turns into a “giving birth while trapped inside an SUV” situation, Matt does his best to comfort her and make sure she is nourished and warm as much as possible, while also taking a toll on his own personal well-being.

While I am not going to spoil what happens in this survival thriller, Centigrade does lead its audience to a logical outcome, while also briefly showing us some of the beautiful winter countryside and snow-covered mountains in Norway. Having been inspired by real events, the movie does pretty much rely on its two actors Vincent Piazza and Genesis Rodriguez to carry the movie, with the latter also responsible for the pregnancy/childbirth. Both do their best to showcase the strife and struggle to maintain composure while not completely freaking out by their unimaginable situation. The actors both seemed believable and fragile in their own way. The dialogue might not have had much going for it but it made sense for what they were experiencing. Director Brendan Walsh and Director of Photography Seamus Tierney both do a nice job making the audience feel trapped inside the SUV with Matt and Naomi.

Overall, Centigrade is a well-made survival thriller, but it doesn’t go much beyond that. Sometimes I felt as I was trapped myself, watching the couple argue for days inside the SUV. Having lived through many Minnesota snowstorms myself and very bad winter weather, I can relate to their predicament as when it’s safe to drive though a winter storm and when it’s not. That’s why it’s so important to have winter survival gear in your car for emergencies. As far as the movie’s ending, I would say that it goes as well as one could have predicted. So, I was satisfied that the movie didn’t take any strange or unnecessary twist and turns.

– Review by Vitali Gueron


Have you seen CENTIGRADE? Well, what did you think? 

FlixChatter Review: Disney’s Big Hero 6

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I had never even heard of this film before until I saw the first trailer with a robot resembling a fluffy Pillsbury doughboy and I was immediately won over. My pal Prairiegirl who isn’t normally into animated features suddenly couldn’t wait to see the movie. There’s something so captivating about the big, puffy marshmallow creature and its backstory definitely appeals to both my brain and my heart.

The film starts out with two brothers, Hiro (Ryan Potter) and Tadashi (Daniel Henney), as Hiro’s participating in a back alley robot fights in a town called San Fransokyo. Tadashi thinks Hiro’s just wasting his genius potential with all fun and games, and he takes his younger brother to the robotics lab at his university. There Hiro’s introduced to Tadashi’s brainiac pals: Wasabi (Damon Wayans Jr.), Honey Lemon (Genesis Rodriguez), GoGo Tomago (Jamie Chung), Fred (T.J. Miller)… and Baymax. He may look like nothing more than a big fluffy toy, but Baymax is actually an advanced personal healthcare bot that’s been Tadashi’s passion project for years. “On a scale of 1 to 10, how would you rate your pain?” Baymax asks in his soothing mechanical voice, and he won’t deactivate until the patient is satisfied with his care. Tadashi hopes that his creation will help millions of people some day.

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The lab visit inspires Hiro to want to enroll at the school, and he worked tirelessly to come up with an imaginative thing on his own to wow Professor Callahan (James Cromwell), head of the robotics program. Just as Hiro reaches a milestone with his own creation of microbots, the film soon takes a tragic turn at the university. It’s following a personal loss that Hiro forms an unlikely friendship with Baymax, who in turns help him find out just what really happens at the university expo that night.

The second and third act of the film pretty much become an action adventure as Hiro gets help from Tadashi’s friends to find out who took Hiro’s microbots. These swarms of tiny robots that can link together to form any kind of shape/arrangement is evidently something that can easily be manipulated for both good and bad purposes. Now, I didn’t know Big Hero 6 is based on a Marvel comics until after I saw the film. So that explains the superhero-flavor of the action sequences, and the quirky band of heroes definitely remind me of the Guardians of the Galaxy team, yet another lesser-known Marvel heroes. The third act with all the high-flying adventure is beautifully crafted, but it also feels a bit too frenetic and familiar. I have to say that it’s the hilarious moments between Hiro and Baymax that truly made the movie for me. The scene at the police station and a set of plastic tape featured in the trailer is even more hilarious!

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I kind of wish the movie spend more time with Baymax in his um, birthday suit as it were, he’s far more adorable than when he’s wearing a protective metal suit that makes him look like a bloated Iron Man. The process of getting him into the suit is absolutely hilarious though, but just the way Baymax looks lends itself to slapstick hilarity, especially when it’s running out of battery. It’s a hoot to watch just watching the thing move or do simple things such as walking up the stairs or cuddling Hiro’s fat kitty. It also provides for genuine emotional moments that doesn’t feel forced at all. He’s programmed to heal and he more than delivers in terms of both physical and emotional remedy. As I’m watching it, I’d want my own personal Baymax. His big fluffy hug alone would guarantee to boost your morale no matter how crummy your day’s been.

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Disney’s done it again. In the past five years, it seems that they’ve managed to somehow match Pixar in crafting a story that’s not only highly entertaining but with a high emotional quotient as well. I have to say this is one of the most fun I had at the movies this year, rivaling The Lego Movie early in the year. The 3-D visuals are incredible – the quality of animated features these days have been amazing and it just gets better and better. The aerial view of the city in the flying sequences are jaw-dropping-gorgeous and worth seeing on the big screen.

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I love how the story inspires kids to explore their imaginations and relish their youthful creativity. But it’s how much it appeals to the heart that leaves a lasting impression on me. Altruistic notion is not uncommon in the age of superhero stories, yet when that moment appears here, the sense of loss feels all too real. But then again, I’ve found that animated features can be as poignant and moving as any live-action dramas, if not more.

Kudos to directors Don Hall and Chris Williams for making a character that’s so easy to root for, and a movie that’s both delightful and inspiring. The voice cast are great too, and they’re refreshingly diverse as the ethnicity of the characters have been changed from the comics version. I could easily watch this again and I don’t mind seeing the sequel that’s surely to follow. So Baymax, I’m definitely VERY satisfied with your care 🙂

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Have you seen this one? Did you enjoy it as much as I did?