FlixChatter Review: The Addams Family (2019)

When most adults hear the name The Addams Family, they’ll likely think back to the 1991 Barry Sonnenfeld live action movie, starring Anjelica Huston, Raul Julia and Christina Ricci. The film was based on the The Addams Family cartoon created by cartoonist Charles Addams and the 1964 TV series produced by David Levy. While The Addams Family existed as a cartoon, TV series and live action movie, there was never the existence of an animated feature movie, until 2019 when the directors of Sausage Party, Conrad Vernon and Greg Tiernan teamed up with screenwriters Matt Lieberman and Pamela Pettler to make the computer animated feature, with the thought of making the heavy source subject of death and darkness much more kid-friendly with likable characters and a snappy tune.

The story is similar but also it deviates from the live action version. Gomez Addams (Oscar Isaac) and Morticia Addams (Charlize Theron) are on the hunt for a suitable mansion after tying the know before being chanced out of town by an angry mob of villagers, when they stumble upon Lurch (Conrad Vernon), a former inmate at an asylum for the criminally insane. He leads them to the abandoned mansion/asylum in (of all places) New Jersey and becomes the Addams Family’s butler. There they raise two kids — Wednesday Addams (Chloë Grace Moretz) and Pugsley Addams (Stanger ThingsFinn Wolfhard) – and live at the mansion on a hill for years in comfort and peace, in isolation from the outside world. Thirteen years later, the Addams kids are now teenagers and have to start acting like adults. Gomez starts to prepare Pugsley for his upcoming Mazurka, a rite of passage every Addams family member takes, and they invite the whole extended family for the special celebration.

Wednesday (Chloë Grace Moretz) and Morticia (Charlize Theron)

Wednesday finds a red balloon (insert murderous clown joke here, which they do) and confetti that make their way to mansion and begins to wonder what’s in the outside world. Speaking of, in a town that has formed down in the valley, and a TV show host and interior decorator Margaux Needler (Allison Janney) has discovered the less than pleasing Addams family mansion on a hill, and is hell bent on making it over and getting rid of its inhabitants. She spies on her neighbors though hidden cameras and an online app, which can easily be manipulated for maximum gossip and rumors to run wild in the town. Margaux’s daughter Parker Needler (Elsie Fisher) befriends Wednesday and they borrow styling tips from each other, with Wednesday adding some flashes of pink to her wardrobe and Parker going completely Goth.

Grandma (Bette Midler) and Pugsley (Finn Wolfhard)

The story finishes all too familiarly, with the townspeople and the extended Addams family coming together after Margaux tries to make them hate each other. There are good morals to be learned for those 13-and-under in the crowd, such as accepting others for who they are and saying that differences are what make us unique. There is a cute moment when Cousin It (rapper Snoop Dogg) rolls to the mansion with Snoop’s 2004 single Drop It Like Its Hot blaring loudly (well, at least the “G version” of the song) and we first hear Cousin It’s voice, which sounds like nothing but garbled words. Another song in the movie called My Family (Migos, Snoop Dogg, Karol G, and producer Rock Mafia) incorporates the famous The Addams Family tune and finger snaps, and talks about how “if you mess with me, you’re messing with my family.” The tune also features Spanish lyrics from Columbian singer Karol G, making this a multicultural tune, well in line with the massage of the animated movie.

While this version of The Addams Family is nothing new and different for adults, this animated version is a terrific introduction for younger audiences (esp. those under 13) into the horror-themed genre. It should prepare them for the much scarier and darker versions of the franchise they might watch in the next few years.  Both adults and kids can enjoy the soundtrack, the wonderful voices of Charlize Theron, Oscar Isaac and Allison Janney. You’ll probably snap your fingers once or twice out the theater as you hum The Addams Family tune that gets stuck in your head — like a great earworm that it is.

– Review by Vitali Gueron


Have you seen The Addams Family? Well, what did you think? 

FlixChatter Review – IT (2017)

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Directed By: Andy Muschietti
Written By: Chase Palmer, Cary Fukunaga and Gary Dauberman (screenplay)
Runtime: 2 hr 15 minutes

Fair warning: this review won’t compare the new film adaptation of Stephen King’s It to the 1990 minieries or to the novel itself. Regarding the former, it’s not really fair to compare a miniseries, which is pretty limited on what it can show on TV, to a big-budget, theatrically released feature film. As for the latter, I’ve only read about a quarter of the novel because that thing is a behemoth and I didn’t have enough time to finish it in time for the screening, so I don’t feel qualified to discuss the movie as an adaptation. While I might mention them once or twice, my main focus will be discussing the film, on its own, as a horror movie-and it’s a great one.

It follows a group of misfit kids in 1989- Bill (Jaeden Lieberher), Ben (Jeremy Ray Taylor), Beverly (Sophia Lillis), Richie (Finn Wolfhard), Mike (Chosen Jacobs), Eddie (Jack Dylan Grazer), and Stanley (Wyatt Oleff)- as they try to uncover why children always go missing every 27 years in their small town of Derry, Maine. All seven friends are terrorized by “It,” the force of evil behind the disappearances and deaths, that most often takes the sinister form of a clown named Pennywise (Bill Skarsgard), and the group fights for their lives not to become It’s next victims.

The acting in this movie is phenomenal, especially from such young actors, all of whom have excellent chemistry. Stranger Things’ star Finn Wolfhard as Richie and Jack Dylan Glazer as Eddie stand out with their comedic delivery, and Jaeden Lieberher as Bill and Sophia Lillis as Beverly give some truly heartbreaking performances. Bill Skarsgard as Pennywise makes the character his own, and his performance is truly unsettling, from the way he moves to his creepy voice.

As far as scares go, It does not leave horror fans wanting. Pennywise alone is, of course, frightening, mainly because many of his scenes involve either him in the shadows or brief, startling glimpses of him. It’s other manifestations as each kid’s individual fears are terrifying as well, and their reveals are incredibly well-done; some of them are slow, dark, and suspenseful, while some of them pop right out of nowhere in broad daylight, and I love the variety and unpredictability.

All that said, there were a couple problems I had with this movie. While Pennywise is scary in most of his scenes, there are a few that I think they meant to be creepy or unsettling but come across more as comical- not nearly as much as Tim Curry in the library scene of the 1990 version, but enough to distract from the overall tone of the movie. Bill Skarsgard has said how much he loved Curry’s performance, and maybe he was trying to draw inspiration from it, but if that’s the case, I’m not sure it was a good idea.

I’m also disappointed in how little they focused on the character of Mike Hanlon (Chosen Jacobs). For a movie that is mostly well-paced and makes an obvious effort to develop the other characters, Mike’s backstory feels tacked on; he just talks about it for maybe a minute a little after he meets the other kids. A lot of the climax of the movie takes place in the house where he was trapped during a fire that killed both of his parents, but besides his brief account of it a couple scenes earlier, he never addresses it when they’re actually at the house, which seems like a huge missed opportunity. Considering Mike is the only kid who remains in Derry into adulthood (sorry about the spoiler, but come on, the book has been out for over thirty years now), you’d think they’d spend a little more time fleshing out his backstory.

Overall, though, It is easily the best horror movie I’ve seen in the past few years. I want to watch it multiple times, just because so many of the scenes are so detailed that I feel like I’d notice new things during each viewing. I’m so happy they’re splitting it into two movies, and the second one can’t get here soon enough.

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Have you seen IT movie? Well, what did you think?