CBS Three Rivers: Episode 4 Review

In its fourth episode, Three Rivers is showing a strong rhythm with the most pulsating episode yet. It starts with an uplifting note of a high-school football game, but of course, as this is a medical drama, we know disaster is lurking around the corner. The bus carrying 40+ students blew a tire, injuring all of the passengers and the driver, most critically except for one lucky student. The hospital suddenly went into ‘code green’ alert mode as the massive casualties began to swarm the facility. This is a well-executed show both in and out of the hospital. It seems like CBS allocated a pretty decent budget to create each episode and it showed.

The Three Rivers blog has a pretty thorough recap/review, so this is just my two-cents on the episode as a whole.

The good: The lead actors have been quite believable as doctors from the start, but this episode definitely proves it even more. Dr. Lee’s got a bit more screen time — always a plus — and his emotional performance in the saving-the-driver’s-life scene was great to watch. His encounter with Dr. Jordan is affecting, and their scenes felt realistic and natural.

Dr. Lee and Dr. Jordan share a moment
Dr. Lee and Dr. Jordan share a moment

I like the one where Lee was watching Rose the bus driver from behind the glass, happy that she’s finally breathing on her own after 20 minutes of CPR, which is something of a miracle. If Dr. Jordan hadn’t demanded for him to continue the CPR, she’d have lost her life. Lee asked her how she knew. She didn’t, the head surgeon said, it was only because there was no other critical patient behind her that she let him keep trying before declaring her death. What a sad reality, but I guess that’s what hospital staff must face day after day. Dr. Lee’s expression when he realized that was priceless. It’s as if he knew how blessed Rose was and that no matter what he did, a lot of it was out of his control. Ironically, when something good did happen, they hardly even had time to savor the moment.

One thing for sure, I have even more appreciation for the organ-transplant aspect of the medical field after watching this show. It’s mind boggling the process of securing an organ. It’s hard enough to find a match for a specific patient, but they still have to account for unforeseen scenarios of actually ‘obtaining’ the organ itself once they have the organ. In a matter of minutes, someone could lose a body part they’ve spent years waiting for, and that devastating reality is at the core of this episode. Brandon, whose wife was pregnant, was in dire need of a heart transplant. He’s already in ECMO treatment, which is a last-resort option for someone with his condition. At best, he could live for up to a week without a new heart. So when Ryan finally got a call from UNOS (United Network for Organ Sharing) there’s a heart available for Brandon, he was more than excited. But he did something he weren’t supposed to, that is tell a family member of the good news before the actual procurement team is in place to retrieve it. Sure enough, they hit a snag when the donor located 200 miles away turned out to be unstable, which means the procurement team had to get it within 90 minutes. As soon as Andy learned the good news, Dr. Jordan told him he couldn’t leave to get it, and no other surgeon was available. The tension built as Ryan admitted to Andy he’d screwed up by telling Brandon’s wife that he got a heart. For the first time, the usually laid-back Andy chewed him up. I find his character a bit too reserved in this show, so this is definitely a nice change! I’ve enjoyed watching Alex get all riled up in Moonlight, he’d curl his lips and all the veins start protruding from his neck in raging fury. Call me crazy but I find that kind of sexy. I don’t miss the fangs and white eyes though, but I wish I could see more of the passion and brooding sensibilities that Mick possessed.

The bad: Even with such a riveting plot, this show still leaves me wanting more. As I mentioned in the episode 3 review, my biggest complaint about the show is the character development of the main characters. We get even less details about the doctors’ personal lives, overwhelmed by the patients crisis story line. I understand it’s a medical drama, but if I wanted to see the day-to-day “reality” life of a hospital, I could’ve just rented a documentary on the subject. I put a quote on the word reality as I don’t even know how accurate all the facts are as I’m not in the medical profession. But as with any TV show, a certain suspension of disbelief is acceptable, so I’m not even going to go there. What I do want to know by now is what makes each of this doctors tick. What are their passion, their pursuits, personal life crisis, anything beyond their life in the scrubs. I mean, Dr. Lee’s described as a ladies-man, but other than a couple of insinuations, they never actually show us that trait and let us draw our conclusion based on what we see. As for Andy, it’s as if Alex O’Loughlin gets the short end of the stick here when it comes to how his character is written. I find it hard to really connect with this amazingly gifted doctor. Yet I really, really want to, which is nothing short of frustrating. But you know what, I’m going to stop right there because the short preview for next week’s episode just might be the one I’ve been waiting for! How would the normally unflappable doctor would behave when his estranged wife show up? And the racial bit about a patient calling Dr. Lee ‘Yo Yo Ma?’ Intriguing to say the least!

In conclusion, I haven’t given up yet. I just hope I don’t have to repeat the same points again after next week’s episode.

CBS Three Rivers – Episode 3 review

Hubby’s out on a company event, so it’s been a rather mellow Friday nite. Perfect timing to catch up on Three Rivers that I missed last weekend due to the NFL programming overrun.

ThreeRiversLogoI must say I quite enjoyed this episode called Good Intentions. All three story lines of the donor/patient were compelling and touching, I even shed a tear for the first time whilst watching this. The most touching story centers on the Romeo & Juliet heart-transplant patients who’ve been in the hospital for so long, which is where they met and fell in love. Scott (played by a young actor with an uncanny resemblance to Joaquin Phoenix), a bit of a bad boy with a dark past of drug addiction, is quite a contrast to the sweet girl Brenda, but they adore each other. Their stolen time together is quite sweet, and Andy’s pretty much playing chaperon the entire time, but his concern for Scott is genuine.

I’m not going to write a recap of the entire episode, for that you can find it here or on the CBS site. Here’s some of the highlights of the show:

  • Andy & Scott’s conversation on the hospital roof, after disappearing right before his heart transplant surgery. Scott feels he doesn’t deserve the heart when Brenda is still waiting for hers. Andy shares a bit about his past about how he didn’t have it all together then and almost ended up in jail. He tells Scott that he ought take the heart so he could be there when Brenda get hers.…..
  • Lee and the young girl whose parents are comatose from carbon monoxide poisoning. Lee and another doctor has given her mother a shot of something that could possible cure her, based on something he found during surgery of her brain-dead husband. Lee stays with the girl as she desperately waits for some positive reaction from her mother. Nice to see the sympathetic side of Lee, and the emotions displayed by both actors are heart-wrenching. I lost my mother when I was about the girl’s age so this scene really resonated with me.…..
  • Ryan finally muster up the courage to talk to her crush, as he brings her lobster from his assignment in Maine. Turns out she’s Jewish who doesn’t eat bottom-feeder creatures! It’s a cute, comic-relief scene that gives the serious subject matter a nice break.
  • Dr. Jordan’s scenes with the workaholic lawyer Karen who threatens to sue the head surgeon for making a decision to save her uterus, which prolongs her recovery time. Alfre Wooddard is such a fantastic actress that she definitely elevates the show with her heartfelt performance.

This is by far the best episode of the three I’ve watched so far. The plots are engaging, with talented supporting actors and genuine, relatable scenarios. Well … I wish I could just end there and just say there’s nothing wrong with the show whatsoever, but I feel that I have to be fair despite my initial excitement for the show.

Andy_Rugby
My friend called me right after I watched this episode and we ended up talking about it. We both liked it a lot, in fact, she said she almost always cried watching Three Rivers (which is a compliment to any drama), and this one was no different. We liked the same parts about the show too, but interestingly, though we both thought Alex looked particularly good here, we also agree that his acting was probably the weakest. Sorry Alex fans, but you know what, I like the guy too, I mean he is the reason I tuned as I was a Moonlight regular. My friend and I kept calling him ‘Mick’ every time we talked about the show and I had to remind both of us there is no more ‘Mick the vampire’ anymore! But the thing is, his expressions doesn’t change very much from his vampire detective days: same melancholic, thoughtful glance, gestures, and winsome smile. I guess there’s no surprise we still call him Mick =) Now, this isn’t so much a criticism, just an observation. He’s certainly still very, very easy on the eyes, just don’t ask me to say his Dr. Yablonski is a compelling character. This makes me wonder, if Sophia Myles hadn’t been Beth to Alex’s Mick, would Moonlight be as enjoyable?

Oh, that brings me to another ‘weakness’ of Three Rivers. There’s little character developments, especially concerning Alex’s who is the lead role, that makes me look forward to the next show, eager to see what unfolds. I’m going to use Moonlight again in relation to Alex, where each episode reveals just a bit more progress between Mick and Beth. Of course there are going to be scenarios where we’re introduced to guest roles, but at the core, it’s the recurring cast and what’s going on with them that make me want to tune in. It’s that ‘addictive’ factor that I find lacking with this medical drama. Though the patient stories are affecting, there’s got to be something, anything that would make me care about the doctors as much as the patients. In this episode for example, Scott the young Romeo practically overshadows Mick … er Andy’s character every time the two share a scene together. That’s because I know more about the kid than the lead character, even within just a few minutes. The intro scene when one of Andy’s rugby playmates wanted to pick a fight with him was promising, I thought, hmmm, perhaps I’d learn something more about Andy’s past. But there’s no follow-up to that story, which makes the whole thing kind of irrelevant and pointless.

Perhaps I’m being picky, but I guess I need more than just watching these unbelievably good-looking doctors playing ‘saviors’ day after day. People with ‘issues’ are always more interesting to watch. Based on what I read, Andy’s supposed to have some shadowy past I’m eager to uncover. I just wish CBS doesn’t wait too long to reveal before I lose interest in the show entirely.

Flixchatter Weekend Roundup

Hello readers, happy Monday!

Whew, what a weekend. The weather’s gorgeous here in the upper Midwest (albeit in the cool side, I mean mid 60s for high in August!!) so I’ve been outside most of the time, even spending time of the MN State Fair all Saturday, though I’m no fair-goer by a long shot! We gotta make the most of our Summer now that the brrrr-free days are numbered. They say a cool Summer means a mild Winter, I sincerely hope that’s true!!

Anyhoo, glad to be in front of my laptop again bloggin’ away. I’ve never done this before but it’s my blog so I get to make my own rules =) Here’s my weekend roundup, flicks -related of course, no worries, I wasn’t going to start bloggin’ about what kind of chores I did Saturday morning ….

  • First of all, thanks to CBS Three Rivers show fans, particularly Alex O’Loughlin’s and Daniel Henney’s who’ve visited my blog. I’m psyched to see the show’s premiere come October, but given there’s a plethora of medical dramas out there, I hope that this one has the edge over those. The organ donor/patient plot sounds intriguing, as long as they don’t get overly melodramatic a la Grey’s Anatomy. Acting-wise, Alex looks pretty convincing as the lead surgeon, and apparently Daniel has won Best New Actor award in South Korea so he’s not such a novice in the acting department after all. But without a well-written script, even their gorgeous mugs can only it so far, so I truly hope the writers do a good job here. Oh speaking of Mr. Henney, I had no idea he did commercials with Gwyneth Paltrow for a Korean clothing line. Well I suppose he was a model, which is always a good stepping stone to an acting career. Check out the clip below, ladies, let’s welcome his foray into TV. I sure hope he’ll be a mainstay.

  • Rented Duplicity Friday nite. I won’t bother writing an entire review on it, let’s just say it’s pretty much ho-hum until about the last 15 minutes. Even the star power of Julia Roberts and Clive Owen couldn’t keep me interested, my hubby Ivan darn nearly fell asleep! Tom Wilkinson and Paul Giamatti are pretty much wasted in a nearly incomprehensible plot and colorless characters. The flashback sequences  in various locations is just plain distracting, Tony Gilroy is no Chris Nolan, who’s capable to utilize similar technique to perfection in Memento. Owen’s in still watchable though, and man, he moves and walks like a secret agent, which is why he’s still my top pick as Bond (I know, get over it lass, even the guy is not interested!) But overall the movie itself is downright vapid.
  • Love Walked In novel
    A must-read novel

    One of my favorite weekend past time is frequenting my local Barnes & Noble, sipping my iced chai whilst browsing film magazines (I’m a film geek don’tchaknow). I passed by a table of books that’s been adapted to movies, A Time Traveler’s Wife, the Twilight series, My Sister’s Keeper, etc. Now I’m not a voracious reader (as much as I’d like to be), but the one book that I’m curious to see on the big screen is Love Walked In by Marisa de los Santos I read about a year ago. It tells the story of a Philadelphia cafe manager Cornelia Brown and eleven-year-old Clare, who happens to be the daughter of  Cornelia’s lover, told in the first person of both characters alternatively. It’s a charming and unconventional love story, and the de lost Santos’ writing is just awe-inspiring, both humorous and dramatic at the same time. If you haven’t read it, run, don’t walk to the nearest book store. The rights of the novel has been bought by Sarah Jessica Parker, I personally don’t see her in the role of Cornelia, but whatever. Now, the casting agent in me wonders who should play the impeccably dressed, Cary-Grant-like Martin Grace. I immediately think Mad Men‘s Jon Hamm! I mean the guy screams ‘refined and classy,’ and we all know he wears those period suits well. Now, how about the half-Filipino, golden-brown-skinned and green-eyed Teo Sandoval? He rivals Capt. Wentworth of Jane Austen’s Persuasion as a literary character I’m smitten with. Casting him would be tricky, I don’t think we have anybody in Hollywood that’d look right physically. I’m thinkin’ a male version of Aishwarya Rai (Bride & Prejudice). 

    What do you think, folks? What book would you like to see on the big screen and who should play the character(s)?