10 New Netflix Original Movies To Watch in May 2021

Every month there are a slew of new movies available to watch on Netflix. This month there are reportedly 65 new movies coming to the streaming giant, but of course those include older movies that Netflix just acquired rights to, such as Back to The Future (including Part II and III), The Land Before Time, State of Play, The Pelican Brief, etc. Glad to see Notting Hill will be coming to Netflix, so I know I’ll be rewatching that! I’m also curious to check out older films I’ve missed, like Zombieland, The Lovely Bones, Mystic River, maybe even Scarface!

Now, for this post I’m only posting 10 brand new films that haven’t been released on streaming previously, even if some of them have actually premiered at film festivals. I’m glad to see a few of female-led films and those directed by women. A bunch of these are international films from South Africa, Mexico, Germany, Netherlands, China, and Italy. There are something for everyone here, so here we go:

The Woman in the Window

An agoraphobic woman living alone in New York begins spying on her new neighbors, only to witness a disturbing act of violence.

Release Date: May 14th
Running Time: 1hr 40min

It’s been ages since I saw Amy Adams in something (her brief appearance in #TheSnyderCut of Justice League doesn’t count! Love a good mystery. This one looks really intriguing, it’s got a heavy Hitchcock vibe, esp. Rear Window. Great ensemble cast too with Gary Oldman, Julianne Moore and Anthony Mackie.

OXYGEN

A woman wakes in a cryogenic chamber with no recollection of how she got there, and must find a way out before running out of air.

Release Date: May 12th
Running Time: 1hr 40min

This looks like an intense survivalist sci-fi drama. I like Melanie Laurent so she’s the reason I’ll watch this one, though even watching the trailer makes me feel a bit claustrophobic.

I Am All Girls

A special crimes investigator forms an unlikely bond with a serial killer to bring down a global child sex trafficking syndicate.

Release Date: May 14th
Running Time: 1hr 47min

Per Deadline, this film is based on real events that happened in South Africa in the 1980s. A detective forming an unlikely bond with a serial killer to bring down a notorious human trafficking ring involving powerful politicians is quite a story. The trailer is pretty intense, definitely not for the faint of heart.

 

Army of the Dead

Following a zombie outbreak in Las Vegas, a group of mercenaries take the ultimate gamble, venturing into the quarantine zone to pull off the greatest heist ever attempted.

Release Date: May 21st
Running Time: 2hr 28min

So Netflix apparently took over this Zack Snyder project from Warner Bros. I actually haven’t seen Snyder’s directorial debut Dawn of the Dead (2004) but this one is NOT a follow up of that movie. Instead of being a global zombie outbreak, this one is contained in Vegas. It’s also not based on any of George A. Romero’s work.

Monster

A smart, likable, 17-year-old film student from Harlem sees his world turned upside down when he’s charged with a murder. We follow his dramatic journey through a complex legal battle.

Release Date: May 7th
Running Time: 1hr 38min

Boy, this film took a long time to get distribution! It won the Grand Jury Prize at Sundance back in 2018. It has a good ensemble cast: John David Washington, Jennifer Ehle, Jeffrey Wright and Kelvin Harrison Jr. who’s been in Luce, Waves, The Trial of the Chicago 7, etc. I’m curious if this one offers something different from the run-of-the-mill legal drama.

Blue Miracle

The incredible true story of Casa Hogar, the Mexican boys home that entered the world’s biggest fishing tournament to save their orphanage.

Release Date: May 27th
Running Time: 1hr 35min

Seems that Dennis Quaid is drawn to feel-good, inspirational family flicks. This one is inspired by true events and star mostly Mexican cast. Sounds like a good one to watch with the whole family.

And Tomorrow the Entire World
(Und morgen die ganze Welt)

How far one is willing to go for the sake of one’s political commitment.

Release Date: May 6th
Running Time: 1hr 51min

A politically-charged drama involving young students in Germany trying to counter the rise of the political right. This film was Germany’s Official submission for Oscar’s ‘Best International Feature Film’ category this year. Per IMDb, the title’s taken from the national-socialist propaganda song Es zittern die morschen Knochen, specifically the line that says “Today Germany belongs to us, tomorrow the entire world.” Eerily enough, Nazi sympathizers are still relevant to this day even in the United States.

 

Ferry

A ruthless Ferry Bouman is sent to his native region of Brabant by his boss Brink to avenge an attack on their gang. When he meets the lovely Danielle and old family feuds resurface, Brabant starts to pierce his steel armor.

Release Date: May 14th
Running Time: 1hr 46min

A Dutch gangster thriller set in 2006 that looks quite violent from the trailer. Starring acclaimed Dutch actor Frank Lammers looks like the splitting image of Oliver Platt. This film explores the early years of Ferry Bouman, the drug lord character in the hit Belgian-Dutch crime thriller Undercover.

 

Super Me
(Qi Huan Zhi Lv)

SANG Yu is so exhausted from trying to stay awake. Every time he closes his eyes, a demon chases and kills him in his dreams. One night SANG realizes he has a special power: he can bring treasures from his dreams into reality. Almost overnight, he becomes a rich man. But his wealth also attracts the attention of a ruthless gangster.

Release Date: May 9th
Running Time: 1hr 42min

The trailer for this fantasy Chinese movie looks like a lot of fun, featuring some gorgeous neon-lit cinematography. Nice to see an action comedy for a change, and this looks pretty darn entertaining!

 

Baggio: The Divine Ponytail

Biographical film about Italian footballer Roberto Baggio, a man who inspired entire generations to play football. A unique footballer, capable of thrilling fans all over the world.

Release Date: May 26th
Running Time: 1hr 31min

I’ve never heard of Robert Baggio before but apparently he’s an Italian football icon. Per Britannica, widely considered one of the greatest forwards in his country’s storied football history. Ever since Ted Lasso, I’m actually more open-minded about sports-themed movies now, ahah.


Which of these Netflix movie(s) are you most excited about?

The Flix List: Great Saps in Cinema

Greetings, all and sundry! I have decided to stick with the idea of Lists that Ruth suggested a few weeks ago. Which has presented me with a plethora of ideas. And the desire to tidy up loose ends and and possibly expound on a certain category of character in film. First suggested by iluvcinema in her response to my article on The Top Ten Femme Fatales on FrontRoomCinema. To that end, I proffer a Rogues Gallery of Mugs, Sad Sacks, Fall Guys, Stooges and men who think they are the smartest ones in the room and pay the consequences for it. Allow me to introduce.

To this end, allow me to introduce one of the most talented, yet underrated actors of the past century. Whom many may recognize as a poster boy for Disney during the 1960s and later as television’s proverbial Perfect Dad in My Three Sons. A worthy topic for another time. Though now, I would like to plunge back to the earlier times and films which firmly planted the subject of this dissertation on the Hollywood map while specializing in a specific and memorable type of character.

#10: Steve Buscemi’s Mink in Miller’s Crossing (1990)

The low life bon vivant, conniver, coke head and suggested homosexual lover of J.E. Freeman’s Eddie Dane. Though Buscemi isn’t on film long. He makes exquisite use of his role. Playing fast and loose with The Dane and John Turturro’s Bernie Bernbaum affections. Mink inadvertently sets himself up to be shot in the face at Miller’s Crossing in Bernie’s place. Creating one heck of an unseen plot line while allowing Bernie to perform all kinds of mischief.

#9: Frank Sinatra and The Rat Pack in Ocean’s Eleven (1960)

What chance does five Las Vegas casinos have against being robbed simultaneously during the rendition of ‘Auld Lang Syne’ New Year Eve’s night by a dozen WWII commandos looking for a score? Slim to non existent. Until one of their men dies of a stroke crossing The Strip immediately after the festivities. With a mob fixer looking for clues, Ocean decides to ship their swag out in Richard Conte’s coffin. The Rat Pack is in full attendance at a local chapel as the whispered sounds and word of Conte and his coffin being cremated stops everything in its tracks.

#8: Oliver Reed as Dr. Hal Raglan in David Cronenberg’s The Brood (1979)

A well intentioned psychologist who uses controversial methods to physically manifest his patients’ inner angst and anger in ways as shocking as they are ugly. The good doctor is divorced and his institutionalized ex, Samantha Eggar takes her anger to whole new level. Giving sudden birth to small, childlike and incredibly strong creatures that carry out her reign of terror on Hal and his new family. Not for the faint of heart!

#7: Orson Welles’ Michael O’Hara in The Lady from Shanghai (1947)

Who falls head over heels for Rita Hayworth’s scheming Elsa Bannister. Bored, blonde and married to unexciting, though constantly looking for kicks, Everett Sloane. His and Elsa’s game involves another couple. A proposed fake death, A real murder and $5000.00. That ends with a chase through Chinatown and its final showdown between Elsa and her husband. With pistols blazing in a Hall of Mirrors inside The Crazy House.

#6: Edward G. Robinson as Professor Richard Wanley in The Woman in the Window (1944)

An absolute, little known Noir gem from expressionist Fritz Lang. The professor is unassuming and has it all. A wife and son. A house in the suburbs and a sudden attraction for a portrait in a gallery’s huge window. The professor meets the portrait’s model, an alluring Joan Bennett. Alice. Who is much more than appears to be. A very hard boiled dame. The professor is hooked. Starts to lie to his wife and others to see Alice again. Until her boyfriend and possible pimp shows up. A death occurs and the professor’s sedate life heads South in a hurry!
Suggested by iluvcinema

#5: Joseph Cotten as novelist Holly Martins in The Third Man (1949)

Who travels to post war Vienna in time for the friend who had invited him, Harry Lime’s burial. A stranger in a strange land. Holly tries to get a grasp on the situation while rubbing elbows with expatriates, refugees, British and Russian troops and Harry’s girlfriend, Anna. Who may be a Russian agent and link to Harry. A Black Market kingpin who sells diluted Penicillin and has a lot to answer for. Holly gets played by everyone. Especially the Brits and their Intelligence Officer, Major Calloway. Methodically played by Trevor Howard. Who coerces Holly to be his “Dumb, decoy duck” in flushing Harry out of Vienna’s maze like sewers.

#4: Warren Beatty’s Pulitzer Prize seeking reporter, Joe Frady in The Parallax View (1974)

One of the last great conspiracy films of the late 20th century. As Frady dusts off the cobwebs the assassination of a Senator at the Seattle Space Needle he and a few others had witnessed a year before. Under Alan J. Pakula’s deft direction and a superb supporting cast, Frady moves slowly and is drawn into random events that end in unexplained, accidental deaths. Following leads and getting inside the Parallax Corporation. Then finding himself suddenly in way over his head.

#3: Sterling Hayden’s thuggish Johnny Clay in John Huston’s superb The Asphalt Jungle (1950)

A two-time loser who wants nothing more than to make a bunch of money. Leave the city and get back to his Quarter Horses in Kentucky. Brought into a big time diamond heist led by just paroled yegg and safe cracker, ‘Doc’. Sam Jaffe. Who needs an expendable Hooligan while hiding his urges for very  young, nubile girls. Johnny takes on the role of Jaffe’s confidant and protector as the heist is pulled off with some last second intervention by the police. Only to be double-crossed and shorted by the rich old men financing the operation. Johnny is gut shot protecting Doc and manages to get home just as the police close in.

#2: Timothy Carey’s monumental, gaunt and doomed Private Maurice Ferol in Stanley Kubrick’s Paths of Glory (1957)

Carey is nothing more than a soldier in the French army during WWI. Whose platoon is assigned the task of taking ‘The Ant Hill’. A reinforced position with artillery and machine guns. The problem is. Carey’s and his mates’ task has been going on for more than a month of Trench Warfare that consistently ends in stalemate. A new Commanding Officer wants a maximum effort that has Kirk Douglas’ Colonel Dax leading more of the same. The new CO gets mad and wants Dax to choose three men at random and have them Court Martialed and shot for Desertion. Carey’s Pvt. Ferol is one of them and is given every opportunity to bluster and bully at first. Then break down and grovel as the hour approaches. Definitely Carey’s best and most unencumbered performance on film!

#1: Elisha Cook Jr. – The Grand Old Man of Saps!

Whether he’s giving life to George Peatty. Soft spoken, quiet nebbish with a domineering wife, Sherry (Razor tongued Marie Windsor) in Kubrick’s The Killing (1958). Two bit gunsel, Wilmer Cook in The Maltese Falcon (1941). Just looking to get by Harry Jones in The Big Sleep (1946). Or paranormal incident survivor, Watson Pritchard in House on Haunted Hill (1959).

Mr. Cook reigns supreme in a highly specialized niche. An every man’s everyman. Buttressed by many small, though meaningful roles as  the landlord, Mr.Nicklas in Rosemary’s Baby (1971). Near invisible, Mr. Bunker in The Great Northfield Minnesota Raid (1972). Cody in Sam Peckinpah’s Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid (1973). Soft spoken Willie in Electra Glide in Blue (1973). And a cameo amongst many as Carl in The Outfit (1973) and as Eli the Taxi Driver in Wim Wenders’ Hammett (1982).
Mr. Cook had made a cottage industry and consistently utilized career as a balding, kind of flabby and meek, high voiced nobody with something to say. Often quietly. Sometimes pathetically. Yet, always memorably!

Check out Jack’s profile page and links to his other reviews



Thoughts on
this list of Great Saps in Cinema? Feel free to add your own in the comments.