FlixChatter Review: Incredibles 2 (2018)

The Incredibles was released 2004 when the super hero genre was starting to dominate the box office. It was one of the biggest hits of that year but somehow a sequel never got made. Now 14 years later, the Parr/Incredibles family is back to save the world from bad guys.

Set not long after the events of the first movie, The Incredibles family just saved a city from a massive disaster but were arrested right after because superheroes are still considered illegal. With the help of an old friend, they were released from the authority. But now they are broke and homeless, Bob/Mr. Incredible (Craig T. Nelson) and Helen/Elastigirl (Holly Hunter) needs to figure out how they can support their young children. The thought of going back to the workforce as regular human being doesn’t sit well with Bob but thankfully their friend Lucius/Frozone (Samuel L. Jackson) came to the rescue. He told both Bob and Helen that he’d met a very rich man named Winston Deavor (Bob Odenkirk) who wants to make super heroes legal again and he wants to meet and offer them a new gig.

Winston runs a very successful communication firm and idolizes super heroes, he wants to convince powerful government officials to make super heroes legal and save the world from danger again. With the help of his tech expert sister Evelyn (Catherine Keener), Winston came up with a plan of having only Elastigirl go out and do all the heroics stuff first to prove to the government that super heroes are not dangerous to the public. Having always been the man of the house and the alpha male, Mr. Incredible was taken aback that Winston didn’t choose him for this gig. But since he loves his wife and kids and understands that the job will be their only option to make a living, he relented and encourage his wife to take the job.

As the story progresses, we see Elastigirl fights crime and save many lives while also trying to find the identity of the movie’s main villain who goes by the name Screensaver. Meanwhile, Bob is stuck at home playing Mr. Mom and not doing a very good job of it.

All of the actors who voiced each of the characters were great, Nelson, Hunter and Jackson slipped right back into their respective roles and we audience never get the sense that they’ve been gone for such a long time. Odenkirk’s Winston is a nice addition, he’s basically playing a rich and powerful version of Saul from Breaking Bad. Let’s hope they bring him back for the third sequel. But the character who steals the show is baby Jack Jack, he’s adorable baby with several super powers and got the most laugh from the audience. Pretty sure his toy will sell quite well during the holidays season.

This is a return to form for Brad Bird who wrote and directed the picture. I thought his last film Tomorrowland was one of the worst of 2015. He crafted a fun and exciting family superhero picture. There were some complaints from parents that the first movie was too violent, so he scaled back the action in this one. But that doesn’t mean the movie don’t have any good action scenes.

The highlight action scene for me was when Elastigirl was on her motorbike racing through the streets trying to stop an out of control train. Also, the big climatic finale where all of the super heroes used their power to save a city from destruction was well done and very exciting. The only complaint I have is that the main villain was pretty weak compare to Syndrome from the first movie.

Incredibles 2 may not be a good as the first one but it’s full laughs, exciting action sequences and some social commentary on our current pop culture. It’s still early in the summer movie season but it’s definitely my favorite so far.

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So have you seen Incredibles 2? Well, what did you think?

Question of the week – Which movie/tv genre(s) have you decided to stop watching?

Image courtesy of forum.kodi.tv

Happy weekend all! I haven’t done this question-of-the-week post in a looong time. Well, my pal Ted sent me an email about this topic and I thought it’d be a good one to pose to all you fine movie lovers out there. I’m hoping this would be an interesting discussion point as we’d all have different answers to this question.

So let’s start w/ Ted’s thoughts on the matter…

I constantly hear or read people complaining about certain movie genre that they’re tired of seeing and promise they would stop watching that certain genre from now on. Of course the genre I’m referring is superhero and there are some people who said they’re sick of seeing these larger than life characters hitting the big screens every other months or so. Personally I love this genre and will keep watching it until it dies out, but I hope/wish studios would churn out more quality products in the upcoming months/years.

The genre that I actually quit watching is horror. I used to love this genre, when I was younger I would watch all of the Friday the 13th, Nightmare on Elm Street, Halloween and tons of other horror films during Halloween month and would always go see any new horror film opening each weekend. But as I got older and the introduction of torture porn in the late 90s and 2000s, I was turned off by the countless gore and torture scenes. I don’t see any entertaining value in watching someone gets their hands or legs cut off or just torture in the most painful way possible. Now I do love The Walking Dead TV show but the show is more about human dramas dealing with post apocalyptic world than just zombies tearing into people’s fresh.

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Another genre I quit watching, well it’s not really a genre but I hardly pay attention to independent films anymore. When I was a young inspiring filmmaker, I would attend indie film festivals all over the country, been to Sundance a couple of times. But as the years gone by, I found that many of these so-called “indie” films to be more pretentious and just plain bad. Don’t get me wrong, there are some great indie films that were made within the last several years but I don’t want to waste my time sitting through crappy low budget films just to find one or two good ones.

And here’s two cents…

Well, in response to Ted’s comments, I’ve never been a fan of horror films. Of course there are exceptions, in fact I’m still curious about The Babadook as I heard it’s more of a psycho horror than a violent, bloody genre film. I completely agree w/ Ted that I have no stomach for gore and torture and I really think that far more often than not, it is absolutely gratuitous.

But in terms of indie films, given that I’ve been on an indie kick this past month thanks to MSPIFF and other press screenings, that’s one genre I’ll never get tired of. In fact, just this week alone I saw a couple of indie gems on the big screen!

I think just like big budget films, there are as many bad apples as there are good ones. But with indie films, even if it wasn’t successful, they seem to be more character and story driven than big-budget ones. Even if they’re not perfect, I’d still get something out of most indie films I watch, whilst that’s not the case on bad big-budget movies.

I’d say that the genre I’m not as keen on watching anymore is the one a lot of people might share… and that is comic-book movies! Now, I used to LOVE comic-book movies, I mean one of the first Hollywood movies I saw as a kid was Superman: The Movie, and there have been countless of them since that I enjoyed. But lately I’m just tired of ’em that I can’t even watch the trailers anymore. As with anything, an excessive amount of anything is never a good thing. Alas, this is one genre that seems to be impervious to critics and box office numbers. Yes, I’m still excited for Captain America: Civil War next week because I LOVE the first two films. But I’m not really that excited to see X-Men: Apocalypse or Suicide Squad later this year.

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I don’t even know if I’ll see those on the big screen to be honest, the press screening for Apocalypse has been scheduled but I’ve passed on it. I don’t even pay attention to Marvel Phase 3 movies and whatever schedule DC’s got cooking to counter that (apart from Wonder Woman that is, for obvious reasons). I’m also sick of those endless cash-grabs that gargantuan studios *cough* Disney *cough* keep churning out, i.e. Maleficent 2 (???!??!) I sincerely hope my darling Sam Riley would say no to playing Diaval again in this pointless sequel, as much as I enjoy watching him in all the hilarious promo interviews!


So what about you folks? Is there a movie genre(s) that you’ve decided to quit watching?

Guest Post – Musings from a part-time cartoon artist: Maybe some comics shouldn’t be movies

Special thanks to guest contributor Rich Watson from the film blog
Wide Screen World for today’s post.


During the opening weekend of the new Fantastic Four movie, I saw a discussion on Facebook in which people were putting it down, and more importantly, praising the original incarnation – the comic book created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby in 1961 which signaled a sea change in the industry. Among the comments included one by my cartoonist buddy Scott Roberts, whom I’ve talked about before on my blog. He questioned a notion that, in this age of comic book superhero movies, we’ve perhaps taken for granted:

“Maybe some properties are better left as they were. We’ve become conditioned to thinking that everything that was ever written, drawn, sung or even thought MUST MUST MUST be made into a movie (or “the” movie) ASAP, or it will never be an official, top tier part of our pop culture.”

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I’m as guilty of this as anyone. Fantastic Four was the comic that got me into comics, long ago during my youth – the art, the writing, the cosmic-scale adventure and the unique family dynamic all appealed to me from the start – and like many fans, I had hoped that this new movie, directed by young turk Josh Trank, would be an improvement over the Tim Story duology from less than a decade ago. It mattered to me, for what amounts to the same reason that Scott brought up, though I never admitted it to myself: I wanted it to be “legitimate” somehow. I wanted an FF movie that I could hold up next to Avengers, Iron Man, The Dark Knight, Spider-Man and Superman and have it judged as good as those movies, for the sake of my childhood memories of enjoying the comic. Instead, it looks like it’s going to be one of the year’s biggest bombs.

On the one hand, this attitude is indicative of the exalted place movies still hold within our culture. In a time in which television and video games have improved their standing in the eyes of Fandom Assembled, movies are still considered the gold standard. Even with the prose novel I’m currently working on, in the back of my mind, I’ve thought about who would play which character if it ever became a movie. However, are we so in thrall to the spell movies cast on us that it blinds us to the inherent value of “lesser” media – especially when comics are concerned?

F4ComicsComics were considered “lesser” for years, looked down upon by many as juvenile and inferior. Then groundbreaking titles like The Dark Knight Returns, Maus and Sandman got noticed outside of the industry, and the way the public thought about the medium began to change. When more fans permeated Hollywood, the current wave of comic book adaptations took off: superhero material like Blade, X-Men and Spider-Man; avant-garde films like American Splendor, A History of Violence and Ghost World; and small-screen adaptations like The Walking Dead, Agents of SHIELD and Daredevil. Even Broadway has caught the bug now, with the lavish spectacle Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark and the Tony-winning Fun Home. Still, for many fans, movies are the default medium of choice when imagining live-action adaptations. But why do we expect Hollywood to come calling for every hit comic?

Watchmen scribe Alan Moore has said that when he created that book with artist Dave Gibbons, he did it with an eye towards taking full advantage of the strengths of the medium – things like the deliberate nine-panel-per-page pacing, the visual transitions from one scene to the next, the way words can tell one story and pictures another simultaneously, etc. – and the result was a work that was resistant to a movie adaptation for many years, though Hollywood tried its best. Director Zack Snyder finally succeeded in 2009, and while certain elements were unable to make the original theatrical cut, such as the comic-within-a-comic “Tales of the Black Freighter” – which ran throughout Watchmen and provided a counterpoint to the main story – he came about as close as any filmmaker possibly could to capture the book’s spirit. And the film’s existence, while it may be anathema to some, doesn’t negate that of the book.

WatchmenWas it inherently wrong of Snyder to have made a Watchmen movie? Moore thought so; he had his name taken off the credits. And while some have mocked him for what could be considered an absolutist view, he’s been burned by Hollywood before. He saw no need for a Watchmen movie, but many people, many fans of the book, did. Personally, I was ambivalent at most on the matter. I didn’t really believe it would happen, and once it was announced, I wasn’t thrilled at the thought of Snyder directing it – his heavily stylized visual aesthetic, to me, seemed all wrong for an adaptation of a book by Moore, whose work is highly cerebral – but once I saw the first teaser trailer, I was as eager to see it as everyone else. Why? Because I was in thrall to the idea of a Watchmen movie, too – no matter how questionable an idea it may have seemed.

I think what it comes down to is the simple excitement one gets upon seeing what used to be static images on paper come to life – especially images first encountered as a child. That’s a terrific experience, no doubt about it, but what has happened within the past fifteen years or so is that we’ve become like the kid who loves ice cream so much, he pigs out on gallons of the stuff. We’ve become spoiled from so many successful film adaptations of beloved comics, plus adaptations in other media – but not every comic book film is an Avengers, or an American Splendor, or even a Watchmen. Sometimes we get a Fantastic Four, and when that happens, the disappointment seems more acute – especially when all three FF films have been underwhelming at best (four if you count the Roger Corman movie). And yet, Fandom wails, if only they would get X director and Y writer who will do A, B and C, they’d have the perfect FF movie! How hard can it be?

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We expect that comic-as-movie. We demand it. Appreciating comics as comics – appreciating the things they can do that set them apart from other media, like we did with Watchmen – is no longer enough anymore, in part, because we come from a very recent history of comics being under-appreciated and disrespected. I could be wrong, but I believe the idea that comics are “less” than movies remains within our collective psyche today, if only on a subconscious level.

So do we need to take a step or two back from this insatiable demand for our favorite comics to become movies? Do we need to rebuild our self-esteem when it comes to our faith in comics-as-comics? Maybe, though given how profitable comics-as-movies (and television) have become, and continue to be, for Hollywood – due partially to the slow increase in quality – this would be difficult to achieve. Fandom Assembled pores over the tiniest aspect of the development of each new comic book movie, dissecting each detail down to the microscopic level. The studios know this, and it’s not likely to change anytime soon.

And while there will always be those who don’t need a movie adaptation to love a particular comic… is it possible this notion is beginning to become a quaint one?


Rich Watson is entering his sixth year as the creator of the film blog Wide Screen World. As a writer, his work has been recently published in the anthology magazine Newtown Literary. As a part-time cartoonist, his works include the graphic novella Rat and the comic strip City Mouse Goes West. He can be reached at ratzo318@yahoo.com.


Well, any thoughts on this topic? Let’s hear it!

Everybody’s Chattin’ + Question of the Week: shameless tv/movie indulgence

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Happy almost-weekend peeps! Is it Friday yet? It’s been quite a hectic week at the office, rushing against deadlines and all that, but let’s not talk about work on the blog shall we? I mean this is supposed to be my escape!

I almost forgot doing the LINKS post but there have been some great posts from my fellow bloggers so I simply have to share ’em. Let’s start with lists, as who doesn’t love those?

Josh listed his top 50 films of 2010s so far, which has some awesome picks as well as recommendations.

LOVE this list idea from Chris on discovering new music by watching trailers

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, I’m sure you’ve watched the new Star Wars: The Force Awakens trailer. Well Keith broke down 5 phenomenal things about it.

Speaking of phenomenal, check out Margaret‘s recap of the latest Game of Thrones‘ episode (5×02)

Oh and have you seen Margaret‘s Black Swan/White Swan blogathon? Well, check out how you can participate and read Andrew‘s pick on the topic.

Speaking of blogathons, Wandering Through The Shelves‘ Weekly Blogathon’s topic is on Superhero Movies. I’m not participating this week, but I did make a list of Top 10 Favorite Scenes from Marvel Superhero Movies back in 2011. If I were to make it now, for sure I’d add a few from the two Captain America movies!

On to reviews…

Steven wrote up about Pink Floyd: The Wall

Stu reviewed Festen (The Celebration), a Danish drama from Thomas Vinterberg

Natalie reviewed Alan Rickman’s directorial debut A Little Chaos, starring his love interest in Sense & Sensibility Kate Winslet!

Last but not least, Michael shone the spotlight on a great opening title sequence: The Wild Bunch


My question of the week is really just an excuse to talk about my new obsession 😉 But hey, it’s my blog so why should talk about things I don’t really want to talk about, right? And frankly, right now my mind’s been preoccupied with one person…

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Suffice to say I’ve been bingeing on all things Stanley Weber… but it’s even more agonizing as there are so few of his work out there. Much like most of my crushes in the past, Stanley did a lot of stage work in his hometown Paris. Oh what I would give to see him LIVE in the flesh in Anna Christie with Mélanie Thierry.

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In any case, in between MSPIFF and other screenings, I’ve been sneaking time to watch Not Another Happy Ending and the StudioCanal’s BORGIA: Faith and Fear, both are on Netflix if you’re so inclined to check ’em out. Ladies be warned, you just might soon be obsessing over this c’est magnifique Frenchman 😉


Speaking of BORGIA, I simply have to include this insightful post from a historian comparing the two shows on the infamous Borgia family: StudioCanal’s BORGIA: Faith & Fear & Showtime’s The Borgias. This is the blog author’s conclusion: “Showtime’s series is more approachable and easier to understand, but Borgia: Faith and Fear much more interesting, in my opinion, and also more valuable.  The Borgias thrills and entertains, but Borgia: Faith and Fear also succeeds in showing the audience how terrible things were in the Renaissance, and how much progress we’ve made.”

 


So tell me… what’s been your shameless TV/movie indulgences of late? Come on, fess up!

Question of the Week: How do you [REALLY] feel about the endless supply of superhero movies?

Happy Wednesday, everyone! Today’s question is inspired by my viewing of Guardians of the Galaxy last night, and also the recent festivities of San Diego Comic-con.

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I also just read this article written by my friend Raul Marin at Film Inquiry where he talks about Marvel vs. DC and who will win in the end. Now here’s my answer I left on the post:

Even with the fervor of San Diego Comic-con of late, I’m not as excited as I once was for either Avengers or Batman vs Superman. I mean it’s cool seeing those actors on stage and stuff but I’m not as gung-ho about the movies as I did a few years back. I’m still excited for certain stand-alone films, i.e. The Winter Soldier but that’s only because the espionage aspect intrigues me. So at this point, I don’t really care which one will win in the end, tho looks like Marvel still has the upper hand.

So I guess you could say I’m getting superhero-fatigue. I know some people probably already reached that point much sooner than I did, but clearly there are still more who haven’t or these movies won’t perpetually get made. I used to get super excited over Superman, I mean I did all those countdown posts for Man of Steel, but my excitement for its sequel has dropped significantly, as you can see I barely blog about it any more. Raul stated in his post that “…three of the top ten highest-grossing films of all-time are from the superhero genre” and before we know it, all of the top 10 highest grossing would be made up by this super lucrative genre.

GOTHAM_FoxFallI just read this article posted by Screenrant that says Marvel Studios Has Mapped Out Films All The Way To 2028! And that’s just ONE studio, I’m sure DC is not far behind and SONY milking the Spider-man franchise for all its worth down to its last web, as they’re now spin-offing Spidey’s villains. Sinister Six is apparently set for 2016 with its sequel in 2018 [face palm]. I’m so bored with the Spidey franchise already, as I skipped The Amazing Spider-man and probably won’t even rent it. I think my excitement for the first Spidey reboot was highly influenced by seeing Andrew Garfield up-close at Comic-con.

It’s not just the movies, television is bursting with superhero-themed shows with no sign of slowing down. The most-buzzed about new Fall show is the Batman prequel GOTHAM, which seems to be getting positive buzz so far. I might check it out simply out of curiosity, but who knows how long I will keep tuning in, as I got tired of Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D after just half a dozen episodes.

So clearly the superhero genre is flexing their Thor-sized muscles even more than before. Is the superhero bubble at its tipping point now and ready to burst at any moment? It seems far-fetched now but it’s happened to other popular genres before so I don’t think any genre is exempt from falling out of mainstream’s market. To say the superhero market is over-saturated is putting it mildly, but hey, Hollywood loves money so they’ll do whatever it takes to keep this craze going and going and going …


So what say you folks? How do you [REALLY] feel about the superhero movies? Are they becoming ho-hum or are you still gung-ho for ’em?

Musings on Batman casting… and the actor who gets my vote for the role: Richard Armitage

Perhaps one of the BIGGEST news out of Comic-con this year was the fact that Warner Bros. is developing a Superman & Batman film coming out in 2015. Zack Snyder (via actor Harry Lennix who played Gen Swanwick in Man of Steel) announced it to 6,500 screaming fans at Hall H, and the reaction was uproarious. Whether it’s a positive or negative reaction is hard to tell at the moment, as it was hugely unexpected.

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My knee-jerk reaction was WTF??! I mean honestly, why on earth would they do such a thing? Seemingly a desperate move to get the ball rolling for the Justice League movie, throwing away all that work developing a compelling origin story on Superman. As much as I like both of those DC characters, in fact, I’ve always said I’m more of a DC than Marvel girl because of Superman AND Batman. But yet, the idea of seeing those two characters on screen TOGETHER in a film seems so… ill-advised. Darryl wrote this in-depth post on how the Superman & Batman film might change the character of Batman as we know it, which further suggest the complicated [read: thorny] predicament of the two co-existing within a feature film.

That said, I have to admit that this news rouse my curiosity whether and how that adaptation would actually look like. Is it one of those ideas that’s so crazy it’s brilliant… maybe?

This piece of news also threw the entertainment media into a frenzy, as article after article not only report the news but dissect or lambast the very idea. Naturally, it’s a pretty BIG news, and one that’ll surely keep on buzzing amongst entertainment fodder and comic geeks alike. I reckon that IF this idea was ever going to work, a SUPER script of EPIC proportion is in order… I mean, it was tricky enough for Marvel to bring all those superheroes together in The Avengers, I think the challenge for Batman & Superman is a thousand times bigger. The other precarious issue is the casting.

Now, before we get to that, I just want to briefly talk about Batman: Year One, an animated feature based on Frank Millers’ comics released in 1987. The story recounts the beginning of Bruce Wayne’s career as Batman and Jim Gordon’s with the Gotham City Police Department, which has been corrupted as much as the rest of Gotham. Bruce Wayne is at the age of 25, having just returned home to Gotham City from training abroad in martial arts, manhunting, and science for the past 12 years. I love the dark tone, grit and realism of the story and the humanity of the titular hero, which obviously inspired Christopher Nolan’s Batman trilogy. Now, the one thing that strikes me, as my pal Ted also pointed out, is how much Bruce Wayne in THIS adaptation looks like Richard Armitage!!

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Just the past 10 days alone, I’ve read countless of articles speculating just who’ll don the Batsuit and share the screen with Henry Cavill as Superman. My friend Terrence dedicated his Time to Vote Tuesday poll last week on it, combining both TV and Film actors. Now, a bunch of major sites also made their picks of who they’d like to see cast as Batman. Total Film, The Playlist, Screenrant, Nerdbastards, just to name a few, have posted their picks, listing all kinds of actors that got me either nodding enthusiastically or shaking my head in disgust [Joe Manganiello?? I mean, seriously??] But all these sites have one thing in common… all of them got it right to list this classy Brit on their list!

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Seriously, this is a no-brainer folks. I mean, he’s already working for Warner Bros for The Hobbit, so why doesn’t the studio just offer him another contract? I don’t think the fact that he’s already playing Thorin Oakenshield is a disadvantage, I mean he doesn’t even look like himself in that role. He’s playing a dwarf under all that beard and stringy long hair which camouflages his tall, lean figure, so I doubt people would confuse the two roles. He’s not a household name yet [which boggles the mind], but I think that fact works in his favor as he doesn’t have a ‘baggage’ if you will, of being associated with a previous role.

Whether it’s the Superman & Batman film or reboot of the Batman franchise, it’s always fun to talk about the casting of this beloved DC hero. I was going to list my top five picks to play Batman but you know what, for me there’s only one actor who I think is PERFECT for this role… so I might as well just list the seven reasons why he’s the obvious choice:

His looks

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Let’s face it, this is the kind of role where the look of the actor is of the essence. The 41-year-old Englishman has the entire package. At nearly 6’3″, he’s all lean muscle with a chiseled yet rugged features, rockin’ a permanent five-o’clock-shadow look like nobody’s business. Yes I’d rather not see THAT face covered with the Bat cowl, but that’s ok, there’ll be plenty of Bruce Wayne scenes to make up for that. Even without seeing him in person, he’s what you’d call text-book handsome, but with an edge. There’s the right amount of danger, that rugged masculinity that makes him the perfect go-to guy for various anti-hero roles [i.e. in Spooks, Strike Back, Robin Hood]. It’s time that he makes his big-screen breakthrough, in fact it’s been way long overdue.

His intensity

I don’t often agree with The Playlist, but I LOVE what their post said about Armitage, saying that he “… has a similar, Bale-like intensity and the ability to convey a number of emotions through a glassy stare or purse-lipped facial expression. When it comes to the mood of the Dark Knight, especially when he’s at his darkest, Armitage could easily bring that to life.” Yes absolutely!

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I first noticed Richard as John Thornton in BBC’s North & South and one thing I noticed right away is the fierce intensity he brings to the character. Plus he’s got that enormous screen presence even with no words spoken. But don’t confuse his stillness with being wooden, in fact, he always comes across as a sensitive loner who’s got a lot going for him that he simply can’t reveal to the world. Now who does that remind you of? 😉

He can act

Looks alone just won’t cut it, but thankfully Richard certainly CAN act. His versatility allows him to go from one genre to the next, whether it’s a period drama, fantasy adventure set in an ancient universe, or modern-day spy thriller, he always fits right in. He described himself as being ‘quite a detailed actor’ and he has this controlled ferocity that’s so mesmerizing to watch. I really think he’d bring so much to the role as Batman/Bruce Wayne, and casting him will be the making of that character.

He already looks good in black

Richard seems to wear a lot of black, on and off screen. But dark colors suits him… it brings out the pale complexion and those piercing blue-grey eyes nicely. He was clad in ALL black leather to play Guy of Gisborne in the BBC Robin Hood series, which seems to prepare him for a Batsuit, no? I mean, all he needs is a cape and he should be set 😀

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I LOVE this Photoshop work someone did with Alan Rickman as the Sheriff of Nottingham in the Robin Hood Prince of Thieves (1991). It’s be a bonus if Rickman has a supporting role in the movie as well, that’d be heavenly!!

He already looks like a billionaire

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Sometimes people just have that look that gives an aura of class… and Richard definitely has it. I mean sure, there are lots of actors who are far more ripped for those inevitable shirtless scenes, but are we going to believe them as a business magnate? I have trouble picturing some actors as someone who’ve stepped foot in an office, let alone being the owner of an establishment like Wayne Corporation. Richard has the right combo of brain and brawn, entirely convincing as a bad ass fighter as well as a brilliant thinker. He’d be as convincing in a Batsuit as well as pinstripe suit.

He’s got the tortured soul thing down pat

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Ok so this trait isn’t exactly a make-or-break thing, but I do think for certain roles, i.e. Jane Eyre‘s Rochester, Hamlet, and certainly, Bruce Wayne, such quality would really come in handy. Richard has played a number of these roles, so yeah, portraying the troubled, conflicted persona of Bruce Wayne should come naturally to him. Most importantly, he can make the whole angst and heartache disposition look irresistibly sexy.

His deep, baritone voice

Now, even the most die-hard fans of Nolan’s Batman films have to admit that Batman’s disguise voice is awful and downright hilarious. I know there’s a certain popular actor who’s one of the top picks for this role but sorry, not only does his smug face bugs me, but that guy sounds like Mickey Mouse! One thing I like about the animated features are the voices of the cast are pretty good. Benjamin McKenzie did a good job providing the voice of Bruce Wayne in Batman: Year One, but really, it’s still no match for Richard’s smooth baritone voice. He’s one of those actors who’s as delightful to look at and listen too (eye candy AND ear candy!).

As we’ve seen briefly in his villainous role as Heinz Kruger in Captain AmericaRichard can pull off a convincing American accent too, as do most Brits. I love it when the voice matches a man’s stature, and Richard certainly has that signature commanding voice fit for a superhero


Well, I hope you’re convinced now that Richard is the one and only choice for Batman 😀

Curious to hear your thoughts on the Batman & Superman movie… and of course the Batman casting, so let’s hear it!

Superman: A History and a New Hope

Yet another SUPER post on my favorite superhero!

Special thanks to Terrence for taking part on the Man Of Steel Countdown festivities. I love this post and especially his closing statement…

Is Man of Steel the beginning of a new era for Superman? I think so. It brings in a new era and with it a new hope. That is, afterall, what the “S” symbol stands for!

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A long time ago, in a galaxy far far away, a mother and father on a doomed planet called Krypton sent their one and only son, Kal-el, on a crash course to Earth in an attempt to save him from the impending doom of their homeworld. With the similar appearance of the inhabitants of Earth, young Kal-el differed in a very remarkable way from those who took him in as one of their own: powered by the rays of the sun, Kal-el (now living under the pseudonym “Clark Kent”) began to exhibit and harness powers of a super nature. Under the direction and guidance of his adopted parents, Clark learned that with great power comes great responsibility and as he grew he quickly learned just what that lesson would mean for him in his futuremanofsteelquote

Not only would Clark (soon to be known to the world as Superman) have a…

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