FlixChatter Review: JUMANJI: Welcome to the Jungle (2017)

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Review by: Vitali Gueron

When people utter the word Jumanji, they can’t help but think of the 1995 fantasy adventure movie Jumanji, starring the late Robin Williams, and adapted from the 1981 children’s book of the same name by Chris Van Allsburg. The film stars Williams as Alan Parrish, a man who is trapped in a board game for 26 years, until 1995 when the brother/sister pair of Peter and Judy find the dusty old board game in their attic. When they start playing it, they inadvertently release a swarm of giant mosquitoes, some monkeys, a lion and a 26-years-older Alan who has been surviving the animals and jungle of Jumanji. While Alan, Peter and Judy all survive, so does the game and we last see it on a beach as it lies partially buried in the sand.

Fast forward twenty-two years, we are introduced to the direct sequel of Jumanji called Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle. The movie starts off in 1996, a year after the events in the original movie, when a father discovers the same half buried board game while jogging along the beach. He removes it from the sand and bring it home for his teenage son Alex Vreeke to play with. But Alex, being the mid-90’s teenager that he is, is not interested in board games but rather video games and heavy metal music. As he throws the game aside, the game morphed into a video game cartridge – the kind that fits right in his video game console which is hooked up to his bedroom television. The game is now all but daring Alex to play it and having no choice, Alex begins to play it and gets sucked inside the video game.

We jump to present day, now twenty years later, where we are introduced to four delinquent high school students, all given detention for various infractions throughout the day. Nerdy gamer Spencer Gilpin (Alex Wolff) is caught writing essays for his former friend and football jock Anthony “Fridge” Johnson (Ser’Darius Blain), self-centered cheerleader Bethany Walker (Madison Iseman) is all-but-glued to her cell phone and does not want to stop using it during class, and Martha Kaply (Morgan Turner) is a shy bookworm who refuses to participate in physical education. All four teenagers are sent to clear out the junk from the school’s basement, and soon-there-after the four find Jumanji, now a five-player action-adventure console game.

The teens decide to start the game, choosing the four remaining video game characters, as one is already in play. Spencer chooses the avatar of Dr. Smolder Bravestone (Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson), a very rugged and muscular explorer who is also an archaeologist. Fridge chooses the avatar of Franklin “Mouse” Finbar (Kevin Hart), a short in height zoologist and weapons specialist, when Fridge mistakenly reads the character’s nickname as “Moose”. Martha chooses the avatar of Ruby Roundhouse (Karen Gillan), a commando, martial artist, and dance fighter and Bethany is left with no choice but to pick the avatar of Professor Sheldon “Shelly” Oberon (Jack Black), cartographer, cryptographer, archaeologist and paleontologist. Bethany originally believes that her avatar “Shelly” is female but as soon as they find themselves in a jungle, she realizes that Professor Sheldon Oberon is actually an overweight, middle-aged man. She also has an amusing stint at first as she discovers her avatar’s male genitalia.

The teenagers, now avatars in the game, soon learn that each of their avatars also comes with special skills and weaknesses (some are quite hilarious and provide for the adult humor in the movie). Each avatar has three lives and if they lose all three, the teens will actually die in real life. Professor Oberon is almost immediately eaten by a hippo (a well-made CGI creature) and as his next avatar comes into the game from the skies above, he conveniently lands upon Franklin Finbar, who breaks his fall with his who body. This is where the trio of Jack Black, Kevin Hart and Dwayne Johnson make Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle an absolute blast to watch. We are soon introduced to the film’s villain, Russel Van Pelt (Bobby Cannavale), who has developed the ability to control the dark and creepy creatures of Jumanji.

An encounter with a snake – which the avatar initially try to outwit in a staring contest – makes for an absolutely hysterical scene with Black, Hart, Johnson and Karen Gillian all screaming for their lives as the CGI snake after them. They soon meet Seaplane McDonough (Nick Jonas), the avatar of Alex Vreeke (the fifth player) whose’s a skilled pilot. They also learn that Alex has survived for twenty years in the game but is down to his very last life. With Alex’s help, the group now has the chance to escape the game, but first the players must return a jewel (captured by Van Pelt) to an enormous jaguar statue and call out “Jumanji”. While I will not reveal how the film ends, I will just say that all’s well that ends well and we do see teenagers back in the real world again, along with a now-adult Alex.

The best part of the sequel is the humor that the avatars portrayed by Dwayne Johnson, Jack Black, Kevin Hart and Karen Gillian gave to the plot of the movie. Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle becomes a more refined Central Intelligence (the 2016 Kevin Hart and Dwayne Johnson action comedy) meet Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (the 1984 Steven Spielberg classic). The combination of actors, storyline and CGI actually work pretty well in this movie and the high school aspect makes it empathetic and relatable to the target audience.

While director Jake Kasdan closes the door to the idea of there being another sequel, it thankfully doesn’t mean that Jumanji will forever disappear as it has managed to survive in various forms for many years, both as a game inside the movie and as the real life movie, watched again and again by the next generation of kids and teenagers. The sequel to Jumanji is worth a revisit to the jungle, and would make Robin Williams proud, but above all, Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle makes for one heck of a good time!


Have you seen ‘Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle‘? Well, what did you think? 

RIP Robin Williams… oh how you will be sorely missed.

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I can’t believe I had to do another in memoriam posts when the sting of the last one hasn’t quite left me yet. I was just about to get on the elliptical machine at my gym when I saw my friend texted me: “Robin William died. OMG.”

Then I looked up at the rows of TV sets above the gym equipments, and sure enough… his face was splashed on the telly, along with the indescribable and incomprehensible caption: Robin Williams Dead at 63 in apparent suicide.

My heart sank.

In fact, it’s now four and a half hours after I learned of his passing… and it still hasn’t quite sunk in yet. How could a man who brought up so much joy and laughter to so many people… could not find anything in his heart to be cheerful about? This was after all the same man who made his best friend and former Julliard School roommate Christopher Reeve laughed for the first time after his horse-riding accident that left him paralyzed. It was he who inspired Reeve to embrace life during the darkest moments of his life. Williams too was the go-to comic relief that even Steven Spielberg relied on to cheer up his cast during filming of Schindler’s List [per IMDb]

But I don’t pretend to know anything about depression and how it could overpower even the unlikeliest person, those we THINK didn’t have a care in the world, those with a seemingly la di da attitude… As someone who grew up with a mother who suffered from mental illness, I knew that the outside world never thought she was depressed or had a mental imbalance of any kind. She was a vivacious, cheerful, life-of-the-party type who seemed to have it all together. The fact is, nobody knows just what goes on inside a person. No one. At times not even the person in question… The fact that Mr Williams lived his life in the public eye must have made it all the more difficult.

I just want to take a brief moment to reminisce on what an amazingly gifted performer he is… truly one of a kind in every sense of the word. My first intro to the ferociously funny man wasn’t actually a full-on comedic role, though of course his comic timing was still on display. It was his role in Dead Poets Society as English teacher John Keating, a warm and passionate mentor who inspires his students to a love of poetry and to seize the day. Carpe Diem! I knew what that word represent before I fully knew what it meant. It’s eerie to think that he’s succumbed to the same fate as one of his students in that film.

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As I mull over his sudden passing this evening… I watched a bunch of clips of him in various movies and interviews, often with tears in my eyes… tears of sadness mixed with tears of laughter as I watched him being his crazy, zany self. I can’t count how many of his roles have become my favorites: Mrs Doubtfire, Nine Months, What Dreams May Come, The Birdcage, Good Will Hunting, and so on… he’s a lovable comedian to be sure, yet his villainous roles also made an impression, i.e. Christopher Nolan’s Insomnia.

Spanning over a hundred projects he’s completed, including voice work for TV & movies, he never seemed to run out of steam. Even as he underwent heart surgery and multiple rehabs, whenever he’s back on screen, he’s always in ‘firing all cylinders’ mode, never missing a beat. Oh how he will be missed. One thing for sure, I will treasure the wonderful performances Mr. Williams had blessed everyone, ardent movie fans and casual movie goers alike.

My heart goes out to his wife and three children. I will keep them in my prayers.


Thank you Mr. Williams for all the gifts of laughter and joys you’ve bestowed upon us. Your life was truly extraordinary… if only it weren’t gone too soon.

FlixChatter Review: Lee Daniels’ The Butler

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What strikes me most when I left this film was how the devastating events portrayed in this film happened not too long ago. As an immigrant living in the US, I may not be as well versed about the history of the Civil Rights movements nor the details of racial segregation that still prevailed just five decades ago. But the issue of racism is something we fellow human beings can all identify with and relate on various levels. In Lee Daniels’ The Butler, those universal themes become even more potent as it’s such a personal journey. And what a journey it was.

Cecil Gaines (Forest Whitaker) is based on a real-life White House butler Eugene Allen, who served eight American presidents over three decades. The film opens when Cecil was a young boy in the 20s, working on a Southern Plantation in the Deep South. In one day, his mother got raped by his white owner, and his dad ended up getting killed right in front of him. The older woman of the house took pity on him and trained him to be a house servant. It soon became the key to survival for Cecil as he leaves the plantation, as he’s able to find work from that training which eventually leads to him being ‘discovered’ by a White House staff.

Whilst Cecil lives a relatively happy life, now married and able to afford a pretty nice house where he lives with his wife Gloria (Oprah Winfrey) and his two boys. He loves his job and is well-liked by both his employers and fellow staff. Presidents come and go but they’re all fond of Cecil and find him to be trustworthy. Life may seem quiet in the White House, but the country is in tumult, with dramatic changes happening during his time, most notably The Civil Rights movement and the war in Vietnam, both of which affect Cecil’s life in a personal way.

Despite the tough subject matter though, I’m glad that Daniels peppers this film with wit and humor. Cecil’s enthusiasm for his craft is endearing, and soon he gains a reputation amongst his staff for his unmistakable dedication. I love all the interaction in the kitchen with fellow service staff Cuba Gooding Jr. and Lenny Kravitz, with Cuba as the comic relief. The film shows the contrast between what happens in Cecil’s work life and at home with his family and friends. He’s a man living in two worlds, something he’s perhaps unable and unwilling to resolve. Obviously it puts a strain on his relationship with his oldest son Louis (David Oleyowo), especially as he dabbles in politics in college. Obviously the two don’t see eye to eye on how best to handle the issue of racial prejudice. The film’s tagline says: One quiet voice can ignite a revolution, which is Cecil’s motto. It’s safe to say that Louis sees his dad as a pacifist.

As with many biopics, there are a certain dose of sentimentality here, but there are genuine dramatic tensions and terrific performances to overcome it. In fact, I didn’t feel emotionally manipulated as much as I did when I saw War Horse that’s so overwhelmingly schmaltzy. That’s quite a feat considering how gut-wrenching the real historical moments were, thank goodness I packed a bunch of tissues. I think the protest scene at the diner and the burning of the Freedom Bus by the KKK would haunt me for days. It’s pretty amusing to see the historical characters portrayed in the film, though the film stray into fanciful territory with Louis hobnobbing with all the who’s who of the Civil Rights Movements, from Malcolm X to Dr. Martin Luther King. Surely the filmmaker took a lot of liberties in this area, as it gets to be too hard to believe that one person can be in every single monumental Civil Rights event in history.

I also got a kick out of seeing a myriad of actors portraying the eight presidents during Cecil’s tenure as the butler. The make up looks jarring at times, especially John Cusack as Nixon. Seeing Alan Rickman as Reagan is one of the highlights for me as I love Rickman as an actor, though he still can’t lose his inimitable diction whilst speaking with an American accent. It took me out of the movie for a bit but overall those scenes didn’t distract me from the story.

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Now, the performances. Forest Whitaker will likely garner an Oscar nomination (this is Weinsteins-produced after all) and deservedly so. For one, he seems to ‘disappear’ into his role, a sign of a great biopic to begin with, but he also didn’t overact, which in a role like this is quite a feat. There’s a great deal of restraint in his performance, a lot of times conveying emotions though his eyes. There are moments where he overhears the political talks the presidents have with their staff that literally affect his own family, and the anguish and torment Cecil must’ve been feeling comes through in subtle gestures.

Oprah Winfrey did a good job as well, though it’s a bit tough for me not to think ‘hey that’s Oprah!’ Now, my second favorite character is David Oyelowo as Louis. The 37-year-old Brit does an impressive job playing a character so believably, from the late teens into middle age, he’s absolutely convincing. He’s quickly becoming one of my favorite Brits, consistently delivering terrific performances just in the past few years in The Help, Rise for the Planet of the Apes and Jack Reacher. I might have to go back to the earlier episodes of BBC Spooks as he’s apparently one of the cast!

Final Thoughts: This is the first film by Lee Daniels I saw, and I must say I’m quite impressed by his direction here. I think the filmmaker handled the crucial ‘landmark’ moments such as JFK and Dr. King’s shootings pretty well in that they always serve as a ‘background’ to the focal point that is Cecil’s life. The cinematography is beautiful, I like way he shot the details of the White House. Daniels also like to use music to highlight/dramatize certain scenes, and for the most part I quite enjoyed it. The score by Rodrigo Leao is quite pleasing to the ear as well. It’s quite an ambitious endeavor and it feels one-sided politically, but I think Daniels has crafted a charming and poignant film that I certainly wouldn’t mind seeing again.


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What are your thoughts on this film? I’d love to hear it!

Weekend Roundup: Iron Sky, Good Will Hunting, Top Gear Vietnam Special

Happy Election Tuesday folks!

For my fellow Americans who are going to the polls today, good for you for exercising your rights to vote! I’m not a US citizen yet or I would definitely be doing the same thing today! But whichever way you voted, I’m just glad that tomorrow there’ll be NO MORE political ads!!

Well, I’m not going to be reviewing anything today, just a rundown on what went on this weekend.

The best part of the weekend is that my blogging friend Kristin Griffin from All Eyes on Screen and her boyfriend came to visit this weekend! We had a blast spending all day at the Mall of America and after dinner, we decided to rent a movie as it’s already too late to catch Cloud Atlas.

The movie we decided on? Iron Sky. I don’t know if you’ve seen the trailer yet, but here’s the gist:

In the last moments of World War II, a secret Nazi space program evaded destruction by fleeing to the Dark Side of the Moon. During 70 years of utter secrecy, the Nazis construct a gigantic space fortress with a massive armada of flying saucers.

We expected it to be the kookiest, most ridiculous Nazi spoof we’ve ever seen and well, we got exactly what we were asking for. It’s a Finnish-German-Australian production with a mix of German and Australian actors, and some of the dialog are in German with subtitles. The director, Timo Vuorensola, previously directed a similar outrageous Star Wreck: In the Pirkinning. ‘Nuff said. Overall the Nazi-in-space premise delivers some crazy laughs, though some of the caricature characters are pretty lame as they’re mostly cheap shots at some unpopular characters like Sarah Palin. If you’re looking for some camp, absurd comedy, this might be a movie for you, just don’t expect much more than that. Just consider that poster a warning, ahah

On Sunday night, we opted for something more ehm, profound. We’ve been curious to check out Good Will Hunting (1997) for a while, primarily to check out Matt Damon and Ben Affleck’s Oscar-winning screenplay.

Damon is pretty good in the title role as Will Hunting, a mathematical genius who works as janitor at MIT. The best performances are from the supporting cast though, Stellan Skarsgård as the renowned professor who believes in Will, Minnie Driver who plays Will’s compassionate girlfriend, and last but not least, Robin Williams as the therapist who helps Will find direction in his troubled life.

Well, we quite enjoyed the movie, though I’m not sure that this film is better-written than L.A. Confidential. I do think Robin Williams deserved his Best Supporting Oscar that year, it’s quite an understated and perceptive performance, definitely a much less hyper role than we’re used to seeing him.

Now, last night as I was working on this post, I watched the BBC’s Top Gear Motorbike Vietnam Edition where they travel to the South East Asian country as a challenge to ride a rickety motorbike from Saigon to Hanoi! I mean, even just the sight of 6 foot five or so Jeremy with his teeny tiny Vespa is freakin’ hilarious!

Oh my, it was such a hoot! The first part where they got 15 million Vietnamese Dong (which equals to only $1000) thinking that they could buy a car was a riot!! But wait ’til they get to the actual journey, it’s side-splitting, thigh-slapping stuff as Jeremy Clarkson on a Vespa, Richard Hammond on a Minsk and James May on a Honda Cub went on the 1000-mile journey together!

Check out some of the clips here, though the first part of the episode is not to be missed!

If you have Netflix Instant and you love British humor, I absolutely recommend this show. I might check out other Top Gear adventures in the future!


So that’s it for my eclectic weekend viewing. What did you watch this weekend?

DVD Picks: Slumdog Millionaire & August Rush

I wrote these reviews before I decided on the Britastic blog series, but they work just fine because they’re both British-related. Slumdog Millionaire is directed by talented British director Danny Boyle, and Freddie Highmore who plays the title role in August Rush was born in London. They both also share a similar fairy-tale element in the storyline, but obviously these are two very different films.

Slumdog Millionaire

I finally got a chance to view the 2009 Best Picture Winner, and I’m glad to say that this one does live up to the hype. British director Danny Boyle paints a compelling and heart-wrenching rags-to-riches story that tugs at your heart right from the start.

The film centers on an unlikely teen, Jamal Malik, who grew up in the slums of Mumbai. He somehow defies all the odds to win the highest prize of the Indian version of “Who Wants To Be A Millionaire?” and the story of how he got there and knew all the answers is told in flashbacks as he’s being interrogated on suspicion of cheating.

Though the one of the endorsements on the dvd cover says, ‘The feel-good film of the decade,” Slumdog Millionaire is actually tough to watch at times. Boyle doesn’t pull any punches in presenting the stark contrast between the haves and have-nots, and it’s fascinating to see how movie stars there are worshiped as if they’re immortal gods. The length Jamal took to get an autograph from one of them — who arrives on the slum via a chopper no less — is bizarre and devastating at the same time. There’s also scenes of unimaginable tragedy that these two boys have to endure that force that to survive on their own.

Dev Patel & Frieda Pinto

The heart of this fairy-tale is an unfaltering love story between Jamal and Latika, who also manages to escape the massacre in their village. Somewhere along the way they get separated, but Jamal refuses to give up on his long-lost love up no matter what the cost.

Played by three different actors, all of them portray Jamal with such heart and charm, though the older they get the lesser the resemblance between the two brothers (tricky casting I presume). Dev Patel as the older Jamal captures the essence of a young man who’s seen too much too soon, yet somehow retains that seemingly-uncrushable buoyant spirit. Gorgeous Frieda Pinto is enchanting as Latika, and the two share a believable chemistry even with so little words spoken to each other.

On top of all the great points I’ve mentioned above, this movie looks and sounds good as well. The cinematography is exuberant and colorful, and the music by A.R. Rahman compliments the urban realism nicely with its high energy and edgy beat. Kudos to Boyle for creating such an extraordinary film. His versatility is quite impressive, but whether he’s tackling a zombie thriller flick (28 Days Later) or sci-fi adventure (Sunshine), he rarely disappoints.

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August Rush

“I believe in music like some people believe in fairy tales,” Evan Taylor tells us in the beginning of the movie.

From the time the movie opens in the lush wheat field, it sets the fairy-tale tone of the movie. This is the kind of movie cynics need not bother, as it insists that you simply surrender to its sweet energy and let it touch your heart. Really, once the music starts playing, whether it’s a refined symphony or the ‘music’ of the hustle and bustle of every day life, I was ready to be swept away. Predictable? Yes. But the journey is worthwhile to watch.

The story basically revolves around Evan Taylor, an outcast in an orphanage who never stops believing that somehow, somewhere, his parents miss him as much as he misses them. That dream and the music around him keeps the lonely boy company and helps him cope with the harsh reality. The movie is none too subtle in revealing that the young dreamer’s got an extraordinary musical gift, and he knew it’s the key to finding his parents.

Highmore and Robin Williams as 'Wizard'

The rest of the movie goes back and forth between Evan’s journey to New York — which also reveals the significance of the title August Rush — and the flashback story of how music is definitely in his genes. Throughout the movie, music plays an integral part, the blending of classical, hard rock and ‘street’-music was phenomenal. In fact, the music is a tremendous factor in what make the movie so enjoyable. So clearly the filmmaker is as passionate about the music as Evan does.

Freddie Highmore — one of the best young actors working today — first caught my eye in Finding Neverland. As the title role, the 18-year-old actor who was 15 at the time looks believable enough as an 11 year old, and he is affecting with his wide-eyed tenacity and sincere longings, even without much words spoken. Jonathan Rhys-Meyers and Kerri Russell as the estranged parents have a nice chemistry together, though is it just me or does Rhys-Meyers looks like he’s about to cry in every single scene? Robin Williams as ‘Wizard’ is not as over-the-top as he usually is, though his character isn’t fully developed and we never really know what his real motive is.

Beautiful parents: Jonathan Rhys-Meyers & Keri Russell

This movie is a real tearjerker so have a bunch of Kleenex handy as it was hard keeping my eyes dry throughout the movie. I find this movie far more touching than another musical-themed movie The Soloist, for sure this one is far less tedious. The cinematography of places like Central Park and close-up shots of instruments being played are beautiful, though in some of the close-up shots of the Evan playing the guitar, it’s clear that it’s a mature adult’s hands, ooops!

If you appreciate music of any kind and don’t mind a little schmaltzy-ness and grand happy endings, this is a movie for you.

DVD Picks: Football Edition – by guest blogger Marcus Anderson

Special thanks to avid sports fan Marcus A. for his generous contribution in honor of Superbowl Sunday. I’ve never seen a more passionate Vikings and Twins fan, check out his extensive blogs Vikingstailgate.com and Twinnin.com blogs for your enjoyment. Here are his picks of football flicks for each genre.

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Want to start a new Super Bowl tradition? Why not make a special night out of Super Bowl Eve and rent a football movie? So “get your popcorn ready” a day early, head to the rental store (does anybody still do that?) or queue up a tale from the gridiron.  There are so many movies about football, that hard-charging American pastime, that you might not know which one to pick?

Kid-friendly:

The Game Plan (2007)
My choice for a nice wholesome parent kid football movie would have to be “The Game Plan” starring Dwayne “the Rock” Johnson.   The Rock is hilarious in this one, playing the Joe Kingman. the Big Macho QB for a championship contending football team in Boston. He loves the nightlife, fame, glory and money,  that is bestowed to him.

But then, Peyton unexpectedly steps into his life. No, it’s not the Colts QB, Peyton Manning, it’s his 8-year old daughter, who teaches what being a real leader is all about.

I like everything about this flick. It’s hilarious, unique (sans the predictable clichés at times) and pretty well acted. The Rock shows a comedic side that is really endearing, entertaining and fun. I could watch this movie several times over and still laugh. It has Elvis impersonations, locker room hi jinx, ballet, decent football scenes, lugs, oafs, and very enjoyable moments.  Even the soundtrack good, featuring a memorable father-daughter-football team montage to ELO’s  “Mr. Blue Sky.”

Comedy:

The Best of Times (1986)
I have never been a big fan of Robin Williams, but this is fun role for him. Jack Dundee was that kid in high school who dropped the pass that lost the game, and only chance for a small town to ever win a championship.  Years later, that poor schlep still agonizes over that “butterfingers”moment and decides to do something about it.  Reno Hightower (Kurt Russell) plays the long forgotten High School QB who succumbs to the pressure and returns to help Taft High School reclaim its dignity.

There are many fun scenes in this movie, including breaking up with their wives, challenging the bully to a fight, mascot antics, mud, and a Monday Night Football game between the Vikings and Falcons.  The old saying, those that don’t know history are bound to repeat it applies in a unique way to this comedy.

Drama:

Friday Night Lights (2004)
I first heard about this “project” from a fellow classmate of mine at Macalester College back in 1983-84.  His name was Peter Berg, and when he told me of his cousin’s (H.G. Bissinger’s) project, writing a book about High School football in Texas,  I thought, “That sounds interesting,  maybe I’ll read it someday.” Years later, the book was made into a movie,  AND WHAT a movie it is.

This is the best movie about football I have ever seen. It’s bullet to the bone real, and captures the essence of football as a religion with all the tragedies intertwined within.  It captures the highs of winning and lows of losing that life can offer. It’s pressure in ecstasy as family traditions, bias, and stubbornness leak into the world of high school football.

Tim McGraw deserves recognition for this role as an overbearing father, force feeding a son to play out his lost dreams. Billy Bob Thornton is the head coach of the team, delivering the best locker room speech I have ever heard in a movie. This movie is in my collection, as are all of the first 3 seasons of the NBC TV series.

The state of Texas is the most-represented state in this week’s Super Bowl with  a total of 16 players from the Indianapolis Colts and the New Orleans Saints hailing from the Lone star state. Most notable of these is Drew Brees, the starting at QB for the Saints.   Back in 1996, Brees lived the Friday Night Lights, leading  Westlake (Austin) to a 16-0 and being named the Texas Class 5A MVP.

Biopic:

Jim Thorpe: All American (1951)
My all-time favorite historical athlete who I never saw play live sports, was Jim Thorpe.  He was Bo Jackson before Bo Knew anything.  A professional football and baseball player, Thorpe  also won Olympic Gold Medals  in 1912. He was called the greatest athlete of the first half of the 20th Century.

This movie stars Burt Lancaster (who  later played Dr. Archibald “Moonlight” Graham in the baseball movie “Field of Dreams”). If I could pick any sports character for Hollywood to write a new epic movie about,  it would be for the story of Jim Thorpe.  A runaway of child from an Oklahoma Indian Reservation, who became the greatest athlete in history,  (and an NFL Hall of Famer)  is a story that deserves more attention. Somebody write the script for this please!

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There are so many more football movies to recommend, but like the Super Bowl, only  a select few can make it to the finals.  If you have a Facebook account,  and want to find  out which Hollywood Football movie character you would select with a first round pick for your team, try this fun quiz.