Music Break – The fabulous songs from Jingle Jangle: A Christmas Journey

Happy mid December, everyone! It’s less than two weeks until Christmas so I’ve been watching more holiday-themed movies than usual… naturally.

So this weekend I decided to watch one new Christmas movie and my hubby + I debated whether to watch The Christmas Chronicles or Jingle Jangle on Netflix. We decided on the latter because of the great reviews on Rotten Tomatoes. Well, it did not disappoint! Though my hubby isn’t a huge fan of musicals (and I could sense a slight ‘oh no’ expression when the characters suddenly burst into song in its opening number), he ended up enjoying the movie, yay!

I have to say I really enjoyed the movie! The story has a Dickens-an vibe to it, one can’t help but think this is A Christmas Carol with an all-black cast. Writer/director David E. Talbert has created a new sumptuous holiday classic that’s perfect for the whole family. I was ooh-aahing at the spectacular set pieces, beautiful costumes (by Michael Wilkinson, natch!) and simply magical look of the movie.

The songs by EGOT-winner John Legend are fused with fun and sweet holiday spirit, while some of the songs are emotionally-tinged as the characters deal with loss and betrayal. The score itself is by John Debney, who’s no stranger to working on musical/animated features (The Greatest Showman, The Jungle Book), though I also admire his work for The Passion of the Christ.

Here’s the trailer if you haven’t watched it already:

Well, in lieu of a full review, I thought I’d do a Music Break post instead, since I haven’t done one in months! I think we could all use a huge dose of holiday cheer these days, and these songs certainly did that for me. 

I LOVE this opening number sung by young Jeronicus Jangle (what a fabulous name!) played by Justin Cornwell. The set design of the Jangles & Things store that seemed to have been meticulously designed. The choreography is astounding! It’s no surprise that Ashley Wallen is the same choreographer behind The Greatest Showman.

Can I just say I adore Mrs ooops, Miss Johnston (played wonderfully by Lisa Davina Phillip). Her crushing on Mr. Jangle is such a hoot, she’s such a delightful comic relief and more! I wish she had more scenes in the movie but I’m glad she ended up having a bit more to do towards the end. The trio singers add even more whimsy to an already merry musical number!

I’m glad that Jingle Jangle isn’t just all about pretty visuals and phenomenal set design. The movie is filled with memorable characters of all ages. Madalen Mills is such a joy to watch, a bundle of sunshine everywhere she goes. Though the film is set in the Winter, there’s not a drab mood in sight! What an inspiration to young girls everywhere that Journey is a brilliant kid inventor and she’s singing a song about math. Her enthusiasm and jubilant spirit is infectious, and this song is definitely her calling card that this amazingly-talented young performer is ready to be a star!

I should’ve known Forest Whitaker could sing… somehow I always see him as a serious actor, and he did direct one of my favorite dramas starring one of the greatest singers of all time, Whitney Houston in Waiting To Exhale. But according to IMDb, Mr. Whitaker went to USC where he majored in music and earned two more scholarships training as an operatic tenor. In any case, this one is such a sad but beautiful song.

Last but definitely NOT least, Tony-award winner Anika Noni Rose absolutely killed this powerful song that’s truly the heart of soul of the movie. The loss and redemption theme is wonderfully realized here… Make It Work Again might as well be an anthem for 2020 as we all hope we can make things work again after this pandemic!

I’m not including Borrow Indefinitely song by the Don Juan toy – I initially thought was voiced by Antonio Banderas, but turns out it’s Ricky Martin. Though at first I thought he was a hoot, the character actually gives me the creeps and I find it quite irritating (sorry Ricky!).

Now, who else saw this movie and thought, man this could totally be a Broadway musical! Well, when we can finally go see live theater again, I could totally see this one become a musical hit. I mean, the set pieces would work nicely on stage and the musical numbers already have a theatrical-feel to it. It would be a fun alternative to White Christmas, Scrooge, Elf, etc. while giving performers of color a chance to star in a new + fabulous Christmas classic.


Hope you enjoy this Music Break. If you’ve seen Jingle Jangle, which song(s) is your favorite?

FlixChatter Review: The Gentlemen (2020)

I’d say Guy Ritchie is an acquired taste… you could even say he’s one of those love-it-or-hate-it filmmaker, which means you either love or hate his fast-paced, at-times frenetic style, and I’m mostly talking about his gritty British gangster films, so the family-friendly Aladdin is obviously an exception. For the most part, I like his movies. From his debut Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels, to the underrated Rocknrolla, and the 2015 The Man from U.N.C.L.E., which I like more on rewatch, his movies are often irreverent, cheeky and fun.

After Aladdin, Ritchie returns to his roots with The Gentlemen. He’s back to portraying working class gangsters, peppered with his rather unsubtle disdain for the British upper class. This time he’s got an American as the protagonist, a self-made London-based cannabis [drug]lord Mickey Pearson (Matthew McConaughey). Mickey is trying to sell his profitable marijuana empire off so he could retire with his wife Rosalind. He’s already found a buyer and they’ve agreed on a price. But then of course, things go awry as bribery, blackmail, and all kinds of treachery schemes complicate matters for Mickey and his loyal right-hand-man Raymond (Charlie Hunnam).

The amusing part of the whole narrative is the fact that the story is told by private investigator Fletcher (Hugh Grant, doing his best Cockney accent) to Raymond. I won’t go into details apart from the fact that he’s got crucial intel involving Mickey’s business dealings that include some lesser members of the British royal family, and he’s willing to keep it a secret for a handsome fee.

The interaction between Grant and Hunnam are my favorite parts of the movie. There’s a rather silly movie-within-a-movie bit that’s gleefully amusing thanks to Grant’s performance and Hunnam’s constantly-befuddled expression. I love how Grant’s embraced his comedic side playing a flamboyant scumbag (what the Brits would call a tosser), and he seems to be having loads of fun tormenting Hunnam’s straight-laced Raymond. In Guy Ritchie’s world, even gangsters stand by a certain ‘moral’ code.

The film goes back and forth between Fletcher’s version of the story and the reality, which isn’t always easy to follow. Some of the things happening made little sense, but it was a lot of fun that you’re along for the ride. McConaughey‘s movie star charisma works well for the role, in fact, it’s nice to see him use his Southern charm and menacing energy in equal measure. Henry Golding‘s Dry Eye is perhaps the weakest link of the movie. Not the actor’s fault necessarily, as I think Golding is more versatile than meets the eye, but his role is more of a caricature, not exactly a memorable villain. Not that I think about it though, I think Ritchie’s movies aren’t known for having memorable villains, perhaps because his protagonists are often anti-heroes.

Now, despite his limited screen time, the movie’s surprising MVP is actually Colin Farrell, an inner city boxing trainer known as Coach who becomes Raymond’s unexpected ally. Involuntarily, Coach got dragged into Mickey’s crime world thanks to his students, one of them is played by Manchester rapper Bugzy Malone.  There’s a fantastic rap video at one of Mickey’s cannabis lab, as well as in the end credits that’s well worth staying for. As the sole female character in a sea of testosterone, Michelle Dockery is wonderfully shrewd, sexy and confident as Mickey’s beloved wife whom he adores and looks up to.

It’s still a movie about the boys however, and in that regards it’s not a ‘woke’ film nor does Ritchie care much about being politically correct. Some of the racist, homophobic jokes would ruffle some feathers, there’s a hugely gross scene being played over and over, not to mention a certain vulgar scenario that is disturbing even without being shown. While some may call this movie a ‘return to form’ to what he does best, there’s much recycled material that feels derivative and predictable.

For a gangster crime comedy, there’s actually not a whole lot of action set pieces and it’s perhaps Ritchie’s more ‘restrained’ version in terms of frenetic action, violence and overly-stylized camera work, but of course it’s still chockfull of crude language and F bombs. I like that the movie is more of a battle of wits than wham-bam-action, as the gangsters try to outmaneuver each other to stay on top of their game. Stylistically, there’s also much to appreciate, from the dynamic music (score by Christopher Benstead) to the dapper business suits AND tracksuits (costume designer Michael Wilkinson previously worked with Ritchie in Aladdin), even the ones worn in the rap video.  I don’t know that he’ll win new fans to his cinematic flair, but for those who enjoy his style, I’d say it’s was pretty darn entertaining. I wouldn’t even mind watching it again when it’s out on streaming.


Have you seen The Gentlemen? What did you think?