Guest Post: The Little Things (2021)

Set in the early 1990s, The Little Things centers around Joe “Deke” Deacon (Denzel Washington), a deputy sheriff in Bakersfield, California. One day he is suddenly called to Los Angeles to retrieve a piece of evidence. It quickly becomes clear he has a deep and troubled past with the LAPD. When the evidence is withheld due to the bureaucratic process Deke is forced to stay longer than intended.

He crosses paths with his successor detective Jimmy Baxter (Rami Malek) who is working a new set of serial killer cases eerily similar to one Deke had previously been assigned. They initially butt heads but Baxter warms to the idea of working together when Deke finds some important clues. The two men eventually come to the conclusion repairman Albert Sparma (Jared Leto) is their most likely suspect. As the film progresses, Deke becomes increasingly obsessed with catching the killer, while Jimmy follows his lead.

It was difficult for me to get through this film. Although I know noir films are known for ‘overcooked’ performances, in this case it didn’t work well. The film is a very classic take on noir. All three actors are successful, Oscar-winning talents, but whether it was the script or the stylized performances, the characters fell flat and seemed dated.

This is a huge divergence from the style of films John Lee Hancock is known for. He typically makes bright, upbeat films about hard work and success such as The Rookie, The Blindside, and The Founder. In those films the characters are well-developed and we are given a clear structured tale. The Little Things on the other hand, lacks information and boundaries that would have been paramount to grounding us in any sense of reality.

While his films typically make use of bright natural light, this film makes good use of darkness and filters in light from flashlights and headlights creating an ominous look. I could see how much respect the director has for the genre. It is clear he wanted to make an homage to classics but it ended up getting lost along the way. This could easily be attributed to the nearly 30 years this film was left to gestate. I think the mistake was trying to emulate the classics instead of draw inspiration while creating something new. For me recent comedy/ thrillers that draw inspiration from noir, such as Promising Young Woman and Parasite were much more successful than Motherless Brooklyn or this film.

Ultimately, I think this project should have been left on the shelf as it brings nothing new to the table.

– Review by Jessie Zumeta


Have you seen THE LITTLE THINGS? Well, what did you think? 

Weekend Roundup + Quick thoughts on ‘The Founder’ (2017)

Hello all, happy last week of January! Well, it’s another hectic week… as some of you know if you read this post, I have my work cut out for me now that I’ve embarked on my first short film project!

Well, suffice to say I barely have time to blog these days, so sorry for my absence but I know this day would come. Thanks to my wonderful contributors to help keep FlixChatter going. Some of you might’ve noticed I’ve got some new guest reviewers, including CineMuse Films‘ Richard all the way from Down Under!

I did manage to fit in a few episodes of Black Mirror last week. It’s one of the most provocative scifi shows ever, yep even more thought-provoking than Westworld! It’s unsettling and quite bleak but it’s so intriguing you just gotta keep watching! I’ve got 5 more episodes to go on the third (last) season so far. Not sure if I’ll ever get around to blogging about it, but dayum, everyone should check out this show!

Anyway, I promise to still blog once a week, I’m still hoping to finish my review of Lion at some point. But today, here’s my quick thoughts on…

THE FOUNDER (2017)

founder

Director: John Lee Hancock
Writer: Robert D. Siegel
Cast: Michael Keaton, Nick Offerman, John Carroll Lynch

The Founder is the story of Ray Kroc (Michael Keaton), a salesman who turned two brothers’ innovative fast food eatery, McDonald’s, into one of the biggest restaurant businesses in the world. The movie opens with Keaton delivering a pitch directly to camera for a multi-mixer milkshake machine, and we see him going from one restaurant to another trying to sell it. He faces constant rejections, but one day, he learns that a restaurant in San Bernardino California just ordered six of those milkshake machines. Thinking that there might be an error, he ended up driving Route 66 to see that restaurant in person… owned by Mac McDonald (John Carroll Lynch) and his brother Dick (Nick Offerman).

thefounder_lynch_offerman

It’s quite intriguing to learn how this giant fast food company got its start, as the McDonalds gave Ray a tour through their super-efficient kitchen. I find myself amused by it all, how this small restaurant revolutionized the speedy service technique in the 50s. It’s also fascinating to watch Ray’s persuasive power once he set his mind to something. He ended up convincing the McDonalds into making him the franchise manager to expand the business to other states.

thefounder_keaton

Keaton is quite effective as the driven, ruthless, and callous salesman who saw an opportunity and snatched it, letting nothing stand in his way. Yet there’s a certain charm about him that somehow I still don’t completely hate him. Glad to see him getting more meaty roles post his Birdman comeback. Lynch and Offerman were quite memorable as the McDonalds, and it’s quite an understated performance from Offerman, apart from the one scene where he trained his workers as if his restaurant were a military basecamp!

thefounder_mcdonalds

The film isn’t always engaging though, in fact it’s rather bland at times. For a movie about a fast food, the pacing could’ve been speedier. The performances are rather uneven as well. Keaton delivered quite a performance, but it’s a pity Laura Dern is wasted as Ray’s neglected wife. Still, it’s a pretty intriguing biopic about the dark, shady side of the American dream. Suffice to say, it didn’t make me want to eat at McDonald’s anytime soon.


So how was YOUR weekend? Seen anything good?

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