TCFF Indie Film Spotlight: ‘June Falling Down’ + Interview with writer/director Rebecca Weaver

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One of the perks about covering film festivals is we get to watch a plethora of independent films and discover new filmmakers! One of my most anticipated indie films playing at TCFF is June Falling Down… a story of love and loss, set in a small town in Wisconsin. 

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June tells the story of a young woman living in California who returns home for her best friend Harley’s wedding, a year after her father’s death. Once there, she must confront the rush of memories of her father’s cancer and the fact that Harley and everyone else in her life has moved on without her. It’s as much a family drama as a romantic one, with a compelling and heartfelt portrayal of family dynamic. The theme of loss and learning to let go is one I can relate to. In terms of losing a loved one, it’s not something one simply ‘get over,’ which this film touches upon. The scenes of June with her father in the flashback scenes are particularly poignant, whilst her at times testy relationship with her mother feels grounded and relatable. The scenery of Door County, WI, is gorgeous, it certainly adds to the warm, small-town vibe that also makes for a naturally romantic setting.
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June Falling Down marks Rebecca Weaver‘s feature film debut. She previously wrote, directed, as well as acted in two short films, Winter Guest and Cam Companion (Wisconsin and Las Vegas Film Festivals, 2015). She studied theater at Northwestern University and dramatic literature at New York University. Raised in Wisconsin, she currently resides in Los Angeles and is writing her next feature.

Check out my Q&A with Rebecca below on her personal connection to the story, filming in her favorite part of the world, her challenges as a female filmmaker working on her debut feature, and more!

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Q: The story of June Falling Down is a personal one for you, as you also lost your father to cancer like June did in the film. Would you say that the film was semi-biographical in a way? What made you decide to turn your story into a feature film?

This is definitely semi-autobiographical – with an emphasis on the “semi.” I lost my dad to cancer a month after I turned 22 and after that it was all I could think about for years. So it’s almost like the story had to come out of me. At that time I had friends growing up and continuing with their lives, graduating from college and some getting married, getting professional jobs, while I dropped out of school for a while and really wasn’t emotionally growing up at the same rate – because I was stuck in my grief. That was the inspiration for the movie.

But that being said, I also took a lot of elements from my life and really exaggerated them and created characters that could tell the story externally of what it felt like to lose a father and go through that. For example, June is a very different character than me, even though I play her. She’s very tough and arrogant and at times rude to people and I’m naturally a more introverted, nicer person in real life. I swear! But it was important to have a character that wears her heart on her sleeve so blatantly because that’s just more interesting in a film.

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Q: Given the setting of a small town in Wisconsin, it almost felt like a love letter to the state you grew up on. Would you comment a bit on that and how you choose the filming locations, etc.?

Oh, I 100% wrote this movie to be set in my favorite place in the world – Door County, Wisconsin. I wrote the script imagining my family’s home and I even wrote in the exact names of the local pizza restaurant and bars, all of which we ended up using. It’s funny how growing up as a restless teenager I couldn’t wait to leave Wisconsin, but over the years I’ve missed it terribly (I live in LA now) and I realize how deeply the land and the people there are a part of me. And you so rarely see the Midwest portrayed in films with intelligent, culturally-aware characters and gorgeous landscapes. So it was really important to me to show my home as the beautiful place I know it to be.

Q: Would you share one of the most memorable experiences making this film?

I remember shooting the wedding reception scene with our full cast, about fifty extras, and a blues band playing in an old town hall. I was walking through the crowd filming everyone dancing, and in the original footage you can hear me laughing as the camera moves through the crowd. I was just so grateful and in shock that we were doing this. I couldn’t believe that I had written this movie and somehow, through sheer will, we were making this dream into reality. I was so touched by all the people that had come out and were supporting us by being extras. There were candles lit and a white cake from Costco that my mom helped us find, and everyone was having a blast. It was so unlikely that we were pulling this off. It was such an emotional moment that all I could do was laugh. I’ll remember that forever.

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Q: As you wore triple hats in this film as a writer, director and actor, what’s the biggest challenge that you encounter in the filmmaking process?

Trying to juggle everything was really the hardest part. To be honest, writing, directing, and acting were the fun parts. They were all a lot of work, but because I love them they were much easier. But organizing, scheduling the shoot, raising money (we did two crowdfunding campaigns plus credit cards), and slogging through post-production were all really really difficult. I guess when it comes down to it, the invisible administrative work surrounding making the movie was what really killed me and wore me out at times. I definitely need a producer next time! Even an assistant would be heaven.

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Q: I asked another female director about this last year… Given that the gender disparity in the film industry is such a hot topic these days, would you comment about your own experience as a female filmmaker working on your feature debut?

I actually feel like I’ve kind of hit the jackpot having an indie film come out at this time when there’s extra attention being brought to female filmmakers. And personally I have been frustrated for years about the portrayal of women in film and that certainly helped motivate me to create a character like June. I remember a while back when Tina Fey and Amy Poehler were becoming famous, several years at least before Bridesmaids, and thinking to myself, there will be a place for me, things are changing. So I’m glad that there’s a ton of dialogue about women in film now. (There’s also a part of me thinking, why has it taken so long for this conversation to really get going…) And I’m also really glad that nothing about me being female or having a female lead hurt me in making this movie as far as I can tell. But that’s what’s so amazing about independent film now with crowdfunding and cheaper cameras – you can tell the story you need to tell without anyone’s permission other than your own.

Q: Lastly, who are your personal cinematic heroes who inspired you? Please share some of your favorite films as well.

I love Richard Linklater’s work. The Duplass Brothers. Nicole Holofcener. Lately I’m just astonished by Jeff Nichols. Midnight Special and Mud killed me. He’s a pure artist. I also love The Piano, I love Almost Famous. It’s hard not to be obsessed with Fargo. There’s something about filmmakers that really know the details of their worlds that I love. I don’t watch movies for special effects and camera moves. I want to feel that the filmmaker loves their characters and just humanity in general. I love tragedy and sweetness paired right up next to each other.


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Don’t miss the second TCFF screening of June Falling Down on
October 28, 2016 7:25 pm

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Highlights from TCFF 2016 Opening Night + Review of ‘Blood Stripe’

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For the seventh year in a row, Twin Cities Film Fest is keeping up with tradition of opening the film festivities with a strong film. Last year it opened with an inspiring documentary A New High which goes with 2015’s Changemaker series that supported Homeless Youth, along with the heart-wrenching drama Room featuring Brie Larson who went on to win an Oscar. This year’s social cause is veteran support and once again TCFF picked a stellar Minnesota-made film that features an Oscar-worthy performance by Kate Nowlin. Check out my review below…

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Highlights from Opening Night

I’m thrilled that I was able to see Blood Stripe on opening night! In fact, I was at the first screening of the night as initially there was only one screening of the film at 8:30, but it was sold out even two weeks before its screening. The film’s writer/director Remy Auberjonois and writer/lead actress Kate Nowlin, along with supporting cast members René Auberjonois (yes, Remy’s own father) and Rusty Schwimmer were on hand for a Q&A following the screening.

It was awesome meeting some people who worked on the film at the red carpet at the bustling Showplace ICON lobby. I had a nice chat with Blood Stripe‘s script supervisor Aleshia Mueller, whom I had met at TCFF gala last month. My pal Kirsten Gregerson, who played a supporting role in the film, was there also with her sister Kim. I also ran into fellow blogger/actress Emmylou Barden before the film started.

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‘Blood Stripe’ Review

When I interviewed filmmakers Remy Auberjonois and Kate Nowlin a couple of weeks ago, I hadn’t seen the film yet. I knew it was a terrific film based on the reviews I’ve read out of L.A. Film Festival, well, to say I was floored by it is putting it mildly.

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Right from its opening scene when the film’s protagonist first touched down on the airport, I was immediately intrigued by her. Known only as Our Sergeant, she just returned home to Minnesota from her military duty. The film didn’t specify which country she was placed in, though later she did talk about her time in Iraq and Afghanistan. The film isn’t political, nor does it point finger about the cause of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) many soldiers suffer. It’s a story about a combat vet who happens to be a female Marine, and the trials and tribulations she goes through in the film.
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Despite the dark subject matter, the film is far from somber. It’s effortlessly engaging, thanks to Kate Nowlin‘s immense screen presence. She is tough, powerful yet vulnerable, and Nowlin embodied her character so beautifully. I have to admit I’m not really into war-themed films in general, but I’ve always been drawn to those that focus on the psychological aspect of the soldiers, i.e. The Thin Red Line. But Blood Stripe captures the brutality of war without actually showing it. It’s a mental torture that the ‘Sarge’ endured, at times she’s on the brink of losing it, and it’s a truly haunting performance. Remy Auberjonois contrasted that mental torment with the striking serenity of Lake Vermilion in Northern Minnesota. This film could practically double as a tourism video of Minnesota’s Arrowhead Region, the scenery is absolutely stunning that it made me want to book a trip there pronto.

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I was truly in awe by Nowlin’s extraordinary performance. She also co-wrote the script so she must’ve spent a lot of time with her character, but it’s still quite a feat given that she had no military training prior to taking on this project. I also appreciate the fact that the film utilized all of the supporting cast well, as each had their moment to shine. Chris Sullivan (who I just saw recently in Stranger Things) was terrific as Sarge’s husband, as was Rusty Schwimmer who played the camp’s caretaker where Sarge worked. Tom Lipinski also did a memorable turn as The Fisherman who befriended Sarge. Last but not least, we’ve got the venerable character actor René Auberjonois as the church elder Art who’s the comic relief in the film.

It’s so rare to see female soldiers being depicted on the big screen and I think Nowlin’s portrayal does them justice. The enigmatic ending lingers long after the opening credits, this film certainly adds the conversation to the topic of PTSD in a compelling way. I can’t recommend this one enough to anyone who loves war-themed films, as well as those in the lookout of a captivating, character-driven drama. I sure hope this will get a decent theatrical release around the country as Blood Stripe absolutely deserves to be seen.

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What’s in store for Day 2!

Check out all the films playing on Day 2 of TCFF here, tons of great indie films such as June Falling Down, Funeral Day, Road To The Well, as well as great documentaries such as In Pursuit of Silence, I Do? and Have a Baby.

Stay tuned to my interview with June Falling Down‘s writer/director and star Rebecca Weaver!