Upcoming Flix Spotlight: Clash of the Titans Featurette & The Bounty Hunter Set Photos

A couple of updates on two upcoming movies I’ll be seeing this Spring.

First, we’ve got the Clash of the Titans‘ new behind-the-scene featurette. I saw the TV spot during Chuck last night and boy, I’m really psyched to see this! Don’t know about you, but every time I see Perseus riding his horse into the sunset with the camp 80s rock music blazing just gets me going! 🙂 It’s the kind of movie I just want to enjoy for the special effects and the story/acting is icing on the cake, you know, it’s not a ‘historical project’ by any means as Sam Worthington points out, and that’s totally fine by me. Like Zeus… er, Liam Neeson says, “it’s going to be incredible entertainment!”

Vodpod videos no longer available.

Directed by Louis Leterrier (The Incredible Hulk), the Greek mythology tale centers on Perseus, a man born of a god and raised as a man who is helpless to save his family from Hades (Ralph Fiennes), vengeful god of the underworld. With nothing left to lose, Perseus volunteers to lead a dangerous mission to defeat Hades before he can seize power from Zeus (Liam Neeson) and unleash hell on earth.

You can see the first featurette I posted a while back and the full trailer on my top ten list. The lineup in this flix is impressive as well. Worthington, Neeson and Fiennes are joined by the largely European cast of  Danny Huston, Gemma Arterton, Mads Mikkelsen, Jason Flemyng, Alexa Davalos, Izabella Miko, Nicholas Hoult, and Pete Postlethwaite. It’s set to arrive on April 2nd, a week later than its original release date as it’ll be distributed in 3D. Not sure that one week is enough time to do the digital conversion, but perhaps it just doesn’t want to compete with Dreamworks’ How to Train Your Dragon animated feature (also in 3D) out on March 26. In any case, release the Kraken already, I’m ready for some rollicking good time with this fun action adventure flick!

Courtesy of Chris Gampat

And thanks to GBGals via Twitter, I found this photographer’s blog who shared his photos of Gerard Butler on the set of The Bounty Hunter. Here’s what he has to say about the actor:

I admire Gerard though. Not only because he’s a confident, talented and respectable young man in the industry. But Gerard gave me perhaps my first pleasant experience shooting a celebrity. He didn’t have loads of guards blocking him and he acted, well, like a normal human being. He was very down to earth and even talked to some of the on-lookers. It seemed that he even tried to pose for the camera at times. You can see those in the compilation shots of him in the opening photo.

He didn’t seem like the diva-types that require you to not even walk on the same side of the curb as them. That was nice to know.

You can read more about his experience as a celebrity photographer on Chris Gampat’s blog. Thanks for letting me post it here, Chris!

As for the movie itself, I’ll probably still see it because of Butler. It looks like fun at least, it’ll get me my Butler ‘fix’ until Ralph Fiennes’ Coriolanus comes out hopefully later this year. Besides, surely this can’t be much worse than The Ugly Truth, that one’s barely worth a rental! Check out the trailer here, the movie’s set for wide release on March 19.

Everyone’s a Critic: Reviews from FlixChatter Readers

Welcome to another edition of Everyone’s a Critic series. Today we’ve got an Oscar nominated flick and two sports movies from a golf and soccer enthusiast. Special thanks to Becky, Scot and Alan for taking the time to contribute to FlixChatter!

Crazy Heart (2009)
by Becky Kurk

My sister from California was visiting a few weeks ago, and we both wanted to see the The Blind Side, but it vanished from the theater one day before we planned to see it. Crazy Heart was her second choice, and since she was from the “away” team, I let her win the coin toss.

Turns out Jeff Bridges (Bad Blake) performance is certainly Oscar-worthy. He plays drunk and down-and-out so well it hurts to keep watching him. In fact, I think his role was over-written. I mean how many times do you need to see him vomit or pass out before you get the hint that he’s got a problem? Not as much as we have to watch. So that leaves little left for the rest of the characters. I have no idea why his love interest (Maggie Gyllenhaal) is the least bit interested in him, and there’s nothing in the story that even hints at it. I really think Maggie is a good actor, but her performance here is not Oscar-worthy. That’s not her fault, it’s because of the weakly-written character she has to play. And I don’t know why one minute Colin Farrell (Tommy Sweet) is his musical rival, and then suddenly Bad is his opening act. Sweet then strongly encourages him to write original songs for his band to finally start making some money again. Strangely, Bad turns him down, and again, we have no way of knowing why. Colin, however, gave a subtle but surprisingly good performance.

There’s very little in this film to get you to care about any of the other characters. On the plus side, however, even though I’m not a country music fan, I was surprised I didn’t totally hate the music. And the beautiful panoramas of the Southwest are worth seeing. The story line has been compared to Tender Mercies, The Wrestler and Walk the Line – I haven’t seen the first two, but Walk the Line hits it out of the park compared to Crazy Heart, which barely gets to second base.

….

The Damned United (2009)
by Scot Mattison

Michael Sheen takes on the role of one of England’s all-time great and controversial football managers, Brian Clough. The movie looks at Clough’s 44-day reign as the coach of Leeds United and the events that lead up to the doomed Leeds side.

Colm Meaney plays Don Revie, Clough’s nemesis and predecessor at Leeds. Clough’s sets out to change the playing style of the existing Leeds team, players loyal to Don Revie, and a team Clough has openly criticized for playing dirty. Clough attempts to endear the team to him by telling them “You can all throw your medals in the bin because they were not won fairly”… surprisingly, this doesn’t produce the desired endearing effect.

An ok script filled with very rich characters. I can’t say the movie captured the whole that was Brian Clough though. Lacking is a charming, working-class, boozer quality…  which leads to a “campy” feel to some of the scenes. The movie does do a good job of creating many uneasy moments, and Sheen does a great job of portraying the over-confident and egocentric manager, delivering his lines with a “nasally-condescending-Cloughie” quality. A good watch for football lovers and anyone that enjoys seeing off-center historical characters.

….

The Greatest Game Ever Played (2005)
by Alan Markham

The Greatest Game Ever Played
is not the “greatest movie ever made,” but it is pretty decent as far as golf flicks go. The movie is based on a book written by Mark Frost (well known golf writer), and even if you’re not a huge golf fan, I think those who like sports movies would appreciate this story.

The basic premise of the movie is the story of Francis Ouimet’s (played by Shia LaBeouf) rise to golfing fame in the early 1900’s. The movie begins with Ouimet’s life as a caddy, and as a relative unknown in the golfing world, and follows along with his growth and ultimate success when he wins the 1913 U.S. Open at age 20. The key moment is when Ouimet takes on Harry Vardon (Tiger Woods of the day) in a head to head match. The outcome seems predictable, but the fact that it actually did happen makes it more entertaining. No fire hydrants or smashed Escalades here, just good clean fun.

As I mentioned, the storyline is expected, but I feel it still has enough interest to hold your attention throughout the entire movie. The acting is decent, cinematography is great (from a golfers’ perspective), and the story is entertaining. If the movie were a golf score, I’d give it a par.

Edit: This movie was Bill Paxton’s directing debut. As a teen, Bill caddied for golf great Ben Hogan in Fort Worth, which might’ve explained his enthusiasm for the sport.