Art&Copy Documentary – Creativity can solve anything

artcopy_film

Hate advertising? Make better ads. – that’s director Doug Pray’s statement on its official site.

As an interface designer who once yearned to be in advertising, this is absolutely fascinating. Lee Clow, George Lois, Hal Riney, these are advertising rock-stars whose career everybody in my mass comm class drool over. It’s been said that Lois is one of the original “Mad Men” with his in-your-face celebrity advertising, but my advertising hero has always been Lee Clow, the brain behind the Apple Computer‘s famous 1984 Super Bowl spot and Taco Bell‘s talking Chihuahua. I used to compete with my hubby in college collecting those imaginative Absolut Vodka ads, another brainchild of Clow. But you don’t have to be in creative field to appreciate the work of the people featured in this documentary. In fact, it’s very likely that you’ve bought stuff because of the advertising behind whatever that stuff is.

Synopsis: ART & COPY is a powerful new film about advertising and inspiration. Directed by Doug Pray (SURFWISE, SCRATCH, HYPE!), it reveals the work and wisdom of some of the most influential advertising creatives of our time — people who’ve profoundly impacted our culture, yet are virtually unknown outside their industry. Exploding forth from advertising’s “creative revolution” of the 1960s, these artists and writers all brought a surprisingly rebellious spirit to their work in a business more often associated with mediocrity or manipulation: George Lois, Mary Wells, Dan Wieden, Lee Clow, Hal Riney and others featured in ART & COPY were responsible for “Just Do It,” “I Love NY,” “Where’s the Beef?,” “Got Milk,” “Think Different,” and brilliant campaigns for everything from cars to presidents. They managed to grab the attention of millions and truly move them. Visually interwoven with their stories, TV satellites are launched, billboards are erected, and the social and cultural impact of their ads are brought to light in this dynamic exploration of art, commerce, and human emotion.

So if you’re like me who watch the Superbowl just for the ads, this is a movie for you.